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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 01-02-12, 01:34 PM   #1
velveteer
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How important is exact chainline with a single speed bike?

I'm about 3-5mm off...my freewheel is at the far left where it's supposed to be, and my crank sits as close as my chainring allows it to, just barely hitting the chainstay! I'm a few millimeters off...any sort of disaster I should expect with this setup in the long run?

When eyeballing it, the chain looks pretty straight but it obviously isn't...
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Old 01-02-12, 01:36 PM   #2
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(It's been converted from a 12-speed by the way).
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Old 01-02-12, 01:58 PM   #3
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Here's some good info
http://sheldonbrown.com/chainline.html
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Old 01-02-12, 02:44 PM   #4
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it will be noisy, cause wear, and maybe a slight chance of dropping the chain.
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Old 01-02-12, 03:57 PM   #5
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The risk is dropping the chain at an inopportune moment. You can minimize this by using track cogs and rings with full-profile teeth (road parts usually have truncated teeth to help shifting).
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Old 01-03-12, 12:43 AM   #6
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The crankset is a track/single speed crankset, and the freewheel is a pretty tough spikey BMX freewheel...I'm a little worried my aluminum chainring will wear out, though. I might just go with a freehub wheel...
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Old 01-03-12, 07:17 AM   #7
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If it isn't making a lot of noise, don't worry about it. Sheldonbrown.com has suggestions for adjusting and calculating your chainline. Road chains are more flexible and tolerate a slightly off chainline better than a track chain.
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