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Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

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Old 08-22-12, 06:54 PM   #1
DScience
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What *specific* tools do I need to assemble this bike?

Hello Bikeforum!

Okay, before I ask this let me first say that I KNOW questions regarding Bikesdirect.com have been asked millions of times...trust me, i've read most of them. But, none have answered these inquiries I have so any help would be greatly appreciated.

I purchased this bike from BD two days ago and am waiting it's delivery: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/se/premium_brew.htm

I know I know, it's an SE Premium Brew with a horrrrrribly cheesy design scheme. However I have come to the conclusion that I could care less how it 'looks'...at leas for now.

Anyway, I have had a single speed RB for a year now but am completely noob to any sort of maintenance. (I tried to put fenders on last year and broke a break, and it took two days!)

I have searched and searched, and I want to know: What tools are necessary to assemble this bike properly without damaging the components?

I have pondered whether or not to bite the bullet and get a Park Tools kit, but I can't afford it. Thus I will get several tools now that are needed to put this thing together.

-How much easier would it be to assemble on a bike stand (PSC-9 or PSC-10)??
-What are the chances the wheels will need truing?


Again, sorry for the redundant topic but I hope you see why it justifies a new thread?
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Old 08-22-12, 07:04 PM   #2
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http://www.bikesdirect.com/instructionhelp.htm

15mm wrench, selection of metric hex keys maybe screw drivers?
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Old 08-22-12, 07:06 PM   #3
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I ordered a fixie from Bikes Direct last month. It came about 70% assembled in the box. I needed to affix the seat post with an allen wrench. Then use a 15 MM wrench to affix the wheels. The fork was already attached, so using a allen wrench you affix the drop bars. Same allen wrench attaches the brakes. Then a philips screw driver to attach the reflectors. Finally I used an adjustable wrench to attach the peddles. To summarize:

Adjustable wrench
Allen Wrench Set
15 MM Wrench
Phillips Screwdriver

I put the whole bike together in 30 minutes.

BTW.... The Motobecane Fixie I bought has fast become a favorite daily ride. Took it out twice today. First ride 14 miles and then 18 on my second ride. I was very happy with BikesDirect.
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Old 08-22-12, 07:13 PM   #4
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5 & 6mm allen wrenches. 15mm crescent wrench. Pump. <-- this will get it together, minimum. Maybe a 10mm crescent wrench and phillips head screwdriver.

Wheel truing station, black spoke wrench (probably), 15mm and 17mm cone wrenches (maybe), two appropriately sized headset wrenches, 8mm allen wrench.
^^^this will get it adjusted properly. Optional: crank puller and bb tool to remove bb, grease bb and shell, reassemble. Does not include fasing/chasing bb or facing/reaming headtube...

Or you could pay a bike shop to put it together for you...

It would be a lot easier to assemble with a stand. But easier than any geared bike to assemble without one.

Chances are really, really, really good the wheels will need truing.
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Old 08-22-12, 07:13 PM   #5
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Adjustable wrenches are really bad for nuts. They round corners really bad. Almost all modern pedals can be threaded on with an allen wrench.
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Old 08-22-12, 07:17 PM   #6
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You'll want some grease for the seat post and stem, the headset may need to be adjusted as well.

Last edited by hairnet; 08-22-12 at 07:20 PM.
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Old 08-22-12, 07:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spoonrobot View Post
http://www.bikesdirect.com/instructionhelp.htm

15mm wrench, selection of metric hex keys maybe screw drivers?
Thanks, I definitely watched their videos and read their pages but I felt they lacked in clearly stating EXACTLY what would be needed for different bike's assembly process.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pkaltx View Post
I ordered a fixie from Bikes Direct last month. It came about 70% assembled in the box. I needed to affix the seat post with an allen wrench. Then use a 15 MM wrench to affix the wheels. The fork was already attached, so using a allen wrench you affix the drop bars. Same allen wrench attaches the brakes. Then a philips screw driver to attach the reflectors. Finally I used an adjustable wrench to attach the peddles. To summarize:

Adjustable wrench
Allen Wrench Set
15 MM Wrench
Phillips Screwdriver

I put the whole bike together in 30 minutes.

BTW.... The Motobecane Fixie I bought has fast become a favorite daily ride. Took it out twice today. First ride 14 miles and then 18 on my second ride. I was very happy with BikesDirect.
I really really appreciate your quick and informative reply. Is 15mm pretty standard for wheels?

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Originally Posted by mconlonx View Post
5 & 6mm allen wrenches. 15mm crescent wrench. Pump. <-- this will get it together, minimum. Maybe a 10mm crescent wrench and phillips head screwdriver.

Wheel truing station, black spoke wrench (probably), 15mm and 17mm cone wrenches (maybe), two appropriately sized headset wrenches, 8mm allen wrench.
^^^this will get it adjusted properly. Optional: crank puller and bb tool to remove bb, grease bb and shell, reassemble. Does not include fasing/chasing bb or facing/reaming headtube...

Or you could pay a bike shop to put it together for you...

It would be a lot easier to assemble with a stand. But easier than any geared bike to assemble without one.

Chances are really, really, really good the wheels will need truing.
This is exactly what I needed, thank you so much!

A few questions: I am going to order some parts so in terms of what you mentioned, would it be better to get some Park Tool cone wrenches (15mm), or are crescent wrenches really sufficient (i'm thinking of longer term maintenance as well)?

I thought about taking it to a bike shop, but I want to learn. I wanted to build a bike from scratch, but I found this deal and felt like it was better to get this and add slowly. However I am not opposed to visit one if I need help, but I really want to give it a valiant effort LOL.

One thing you mention (I bolded it) is about the BB. Is it good that mine "Does not include fasing/chasing bb or facing/reaming headtube..."? I have considered taking out the BB and lubing it, but was hoping it's not necessary. Is there anyway you can elaborate? I did search around and am not completely clear what this means.

Now, if the wheels needed truing, would you recommend me trying to do it myself? I mean of course I would get a truing stand, and spoke wrenches. However I've read that it's best not to 'practice' on good wheels (not that these are the best) but can't I hurt them if I mess up?

BTW, i'm simply impressed at the quick replies from all of you! Thanks a lot!
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Old 08-22-12, 09:54 PM   #8
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would it be better to get some Park Tool cone wrenches (15mm), or are crescent wrenches really sufficient (i'm thinking of longer term maintenance as well)?
You will need the cone wrenches for adjusting your hubs. These are real thin wrenches that you would NOT want to use on the axle nuts (for attaching the wheels.) The park tool ones should be good and only cost a few bucks. I would recommend a 15mm box end wrench instead of a crescent wrench for attaching the wheels. A crescent wrench would work but it is not the best tool for the job. You will be spending some time with those axle nuts as you work to get the rear wheel centered and your chain properly tensioned.

You will also need to plan to carry a 15mm wrench with you when you ride. You have to be able to remove the wheel to change a flat. Something like Pedro's Trixie tool will work.

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Originally Posted by DScience View Post
Now, if the wheels needed truing, would you recommend me trying to do it myself? I mean of course I would get a truing stand, and spoke wrenches. However I've read that it's best not to 'practice' on good wheels (not that these are the best) but can't I hurt them if I mess up?
Wheel truing isn't that hard but you can make them worse (less true) and potentially unrideable if you don't know what you're doing. Take the time go over some truing tutorials online. Work in very small increments. You don't have to have a truing stand. Be sure you have the right size spoke wrench.

http://www.pinkbike.com/news/tech-tu...-101-2010.html

http://www.pinkbike.com/news/Tech-Tu...heel-True.html

PS
The wheels on my Kilo TT from bikes direct were fine out of the box and did not need truing. I did need to tighten my hubs after a few rides.
You don't need a bike stand to assembly this bike. Spend your money on the correct tools first.

Last edited by mtb123; 08-22-12 at 10:27 PM.
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Old 08-22-12, 10:07 PM   #9
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You'll also want a BB tool to check if they greased the damn thing, and to check that you'll need a crank arm puller.
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Old 08-22-12, 10:21 PM   #10
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Make sure you have/buy a pump that fits a presta valve. I'm hoping your SS is presta and you are already familiar with this, but many people jump in never having considered the idea that there are different kinds of valves.

Oh, and I don't have any fancy tools for BB, etc. maintenance, a shop has never trued my wheels (I've kept an eye on them), and I've been riding it fine for 16 months. Obviously YMMV, but I've had no issues yet. I will be taking it in for a tune-up shortly, since two seasons can be rough on a bike.

Last edited by fencefry; 08-22-12 at 10:25 PM.
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Old 08-22-12, 10:27 PM   #11
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I couldn't do without a good torque wrench. I have an inexpensive Craftsman beam type to do the final tightening.

Edit: You'll need a socket set with that. Maybe hex sockets too, if you want.

Last edited by tomatsu; 08-22-12 at 10:34 PM.
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Old 08-22-12, 11:03 PM   #12
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Make sure you have/buy a pump that fits a presta valve. I'm hoping your SS is presta and you are already familiar with this, but many people jump in never having considered the idea that there are different kinds of valves.

Oh, and I don't have any fancy tools for BB, etc. maintenance, a shop has never trued my wheels (I've kept an eye on them), and I've been riding it fine for 16 months. Obviously YMMV, but I've had no issues yet. I will be taking it in for a tune-up shortly, since two seasons can be rough on a bike.
Thanks! So do you mean to say that you didn't remove your BB to see if it was properly oiled?
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Old 08-23-12, 06:58 AM   #13
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you have a very simple build, don't make it harder than it needs to be...

the 1st response to your inquiry from Spoonrobot was spot on - all you really need to assemble your bike are 4, 5, 6, 8 mm allen wrenches, 15mm open end wrench, & yeah, a pump
your hubs & bb are sealed bearing - you don't lube or adjust them
it would not be a bad idea to take the machine-built wheels to a shop for tensioning/truing

if, on the other hand, you really do want to pull it apart completely for greasing & reinstalling everything to exact torque specs, & work on the wheels yourself...well, ignore my above advice & you now have good excuse to buy more tools (& i always like more tools, don't you?)

have fun & good luck...
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Old 08-23-12, 10:12 AM   #14
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Thanks! So do you mean to say that you didn't remove your BB to see if it was properly oiled?
You never HAVE to. But there's been instances where the BB wasn't greased in a BD bike. Why not check and make sure, rather than being lazy?
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Old 08-23-12, 11:31 AM   #15
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you have a very simple build, don't make it harder than it needs to be...

the 1st response to your inquiry from Spoonrobot was spot on - all you really need to assemble your bike are 4, 5, 6, 8 mm allen wrenches, 15mm open end wrench, & yeah, a pump
your hubs & bb are sealed bearing - you don't lube or adjust them
it would not be a bad idea to take the machine-built wheels to a shop for tensioning/truing

if, on the other hand, you really do want to pull it apart completely for greasing & reinstalling everything to exact torque specs, & work on the wheels yourself...well, ignore my above advice & you now have good excuse to buy more tools (& i always like more tools, don't you?)

have fun & good luck...
Thanks, I appreciate the advice. I think I went overboard and ordered a park stand last night, a set of wrenches, some cone wrenches, hex wrenches, pump, and some Phil Wood oil and grease. I hope this is sufficient to properly get it together.

I actually really want to do the whole thing like you said, but I am intimidated. I mean, I don't even understand what hub and BB sealed bearings are. I want to ride this bike ASAP, but at the same time taking a week or so to make sure it's precise isn't a bad idea. I guess I don't want to fork over the money for truing tools & stand, headset wrenches, BB tools and crank remover if I'm only going to use it this one time to assemble the bike. Any thoughts?

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You never HAVE to. But there's been instances where the BB wasn't greased in a BD bike. Why not check and make sure, rather than being lazy?
I see. It's not about being lazy (maybe impatient ), it's about having the tools. From my understanding doing all this requires several specific tools that I don't have. But, once my bike is here maybe I can determine exactly what's needed for my bike.
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Old 08-23-12, 01:25 PM   #16
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Optional: crank puller and bb tool to remove bb, grease bb and shell, reassemble..
Quote:
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You'll also want a BB tool to check if they greased the damn thing, and to check that you'll need a crank arm puller.
Can you still buy a bike without a cartridge BB? Or are we talking about the bb shell threading here?
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Old 08-24-12, 10:06 PM   #17
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I didn't realize the price of handlebars was somewhat affordable, and was wondering if there is anyway to tell what size would work for this particular bike? In regards to bullhorn style, is there a standard size that you would guess would fit the stem on this bike?
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Old 08-24-12, 10:14 PM   #18
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I feel like riding it for a while, and then knowing exactly what you want would be better than getting stuff you might not want in the future.
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Old 08-25-12, 12:03 AM   #19
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I feel like riding it for a while, and then knowing exactly what you want would be better than getting stuff you might not want in the future.
I like this idea, thanks! I'm definitely going to do this.
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Old 08-25-12, 12:26 AM   #20
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Can you still buy a bike without a cartridge BB? Or are we talking about the bb shell threading here?
BB Shell threading.

OP: You can buy the tools you know.
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Old 08-26-12, 12:31 AM   #21
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Yea. I was only referring to the handlebars. Getting the tools now would be a good idea.
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