Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-09-12, 04:55 PM   #1
bfloyd6969
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: central Ohio
Bikes: Schwinn Madison, Windsor Dover
Posts: 926
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Look style cleats

I've was a clipless rider during my mtb days, and even used them on the road for a while (mtb spd) until this year when I switched over to non-clipless pedals. I liked the freedom of being able to run a variety of shoes, but always kinda missed the clipped in feel. Just recently I threw my 540's back on and noticed how much closer my feet were to the crank arms when using non clipless pedals (RO-25's). I found that with non clipless my foot would be about 1~2mm away from the crank arm and when I put my 540's back on I was quite a bit further away - approx. 10~15mm (without actually measuring). I have to say that I much prefer the former, being as close as I can be to the crank arms.

So, still wanting to get back into clipless and also looking to get a more road oriented pedal, how much side to side play is there with Look style cleats? I'm looking at either some Looks, or 105's but I really want to be able to get my shoe right up next to the crank arms. I know with some mtb spd cleats, the oval mount will allow some side to side adjustment, but even with them I don't think I could get right up next to the crank arms. Thanks.
bfloyd6969 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-12, 06:28 PM   #2
carleton
Elitist
 
carleton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Bikes:
Posts: 13,368
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 170 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfloyd6969 View Post
I've was a clipless rider during my mtb days, and even used them on the road for a while (mtb spd) until this year when I switched over to non-clipless pedals. I liked the freedom of being able to run a variety of shoes, but always kinda missed the clipped in feel. Just recently I threw my 540's back on and noticed how much closer my feet were to the crank arms when using non clipless pedals (RO-25's). I found that with non clipless my foot would be about 1~2mm away from the crank arm and when I put my 540's back on I was quite a bit further away - approx. 10~15mm (without actually measuring). I have to say that I much prefer the former, being as close as I can be to the crank arms.

So, still wanting to get back into clipless and also looking to get a more road oriented pedal, how much side to side play is there with Look style cleats? I'm looking at either some Looks, or 105's but I really want to be able to get my shoe right up next to the crank arms. I know with some mtb spd cleats, the oval mount will allow some side to side adjustment, but even with them I don't think I could get right up next to the crank arms. Thanks.
I like to have my feet close to the cranks, too.

How far your feet are from the center of the bike will be a mix of crankset, shoes (hole placement), pedals, and cleat position.

There is about 1cm of lateral adjustment in standard cleats. Unfortunately, because of the factors listed above, you will simply have to try your combination out to know for sure.

Road pedal systems will allow you more lateral adjustment than MTB pedal systems. Plus road systems allow you to adjust the angle of your foot, too. Most (if not all) 2-bolt MTB systems don't allow for this.

You'll be fine with a set of road pedals and cleats.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by gtrob View Post
Roadies can run tempo all year as that's what humans were designed for. If you want to be a cheetah, lay around and lick your paws more.
carleton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-12, 07:00 PM   #3
IthaDan 
Senior Member
 
IthaDan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Ithaca, NY
Bikes: Click on the #YOLO
Posts: 4,874
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by carleton View Post
Plus road systems allow you to adjust the angle of your foot, too. Most (if not all) 2-bolt MTB systems don't allow for this.
What?

I take it you've never had a loose SPD cleat. Not as much as a three bolt road cleat if you're crazy pidgeon toed or something, I guess, but plenty in my experience for just about everyone. Back in the days of shoe anchors with just two threaded holes (nowadays, it's 4) you could get damn near 45 degrees in both directions there was so much slop. I had an old pair of specialized shoes where the cleat just wouldn't bite as soon as a drop of water got on them, so I'd have to wrench my foot to a crazy angle to get out.

There is also a side to side adjustment on two bolt cleats (crank brothers' cheaper cleats are a notable exception), it's just that this movement is the first thing to gum up.
__________________

Shimano : Click :: Campy :: Snap :: SRAM : Bang

Last edited by IthaDan; 10-09-12 at 07:05 PM.
IthaDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-12, 07:28 PM   #4
carleton
Elitist
 
carleton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Atlanta, GA
Bikes:
Posts: 13,368
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 170 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by IthaDan View Post
What?

I take it you've never had a loose SPD cleat. Not as much as a three bolt road cleat if you're crazy pidgeon toed or something, I guess, but plenty in my experience for just about everyone. Back in the days of shoe anchors with just two threaded holes (nowadays, it's 4) you could get damn near 45 degrees in both directions there was so much slop. I had an old pair of specialized shoes where the cleat just wouldn't bite as soon as a drop of water got on them, so I'd have to wrench my foot to a crazy angle to get out.

There is also a side to side adjustment on two bolt cleats (crank brothers' cheaper cleats are a notable exception), it's just that this movement is the first thing to gum up.
I think you are interpreting slop in the pedal system as float.

All of the MTB pedal systems that I've used (SPD, TIME, Eggbeaters) have only one angle (or lack thereof) with no float. There was play in them. But that play was a return-to-center type of spring action. So, if you are pigeon-toed you'd have to push against that return-to-center cleat to have your feet (and ultimately your knee) where it wants to be.

By the way, I currently ride Shimano SPD-SL zero-float cleats. My feet are in the right position and are fixed. I believe that float is for people who don't know where their foot should be
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by gtrob View Post
Roadies can run tempo all year as that's what humans were designed for. If you want to be a cheetah, lay around and lick your paws more.
carleton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-12, 07:54 PM   #5
IthaDan 
Senior Member
 
IthaDan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Ithaca, NY
Bikes: Click on the #YOLO
Posts: 4,874
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by carleton View Post
I think you are interpreting slop in the pedal system as float.

All of the MTB pedal systems that I've used (SPD, TIME, Eggbeaters) have only one angle (or lack thereof) with no float. There was play in them. But that play was a return-to-center type of spring action. So, if you are pigeon-toed you'd have to push against that return-to-center cleat to have your feet (and ultimately your knee) where it wants to be.

By the way, I currently ride Shimano SPD-SL zero-float cleats. My feet are in the right position and are fixed. I believe that float is for people who don't know where their foot should be
No, I didn't realize you were talking about float, thought you were talking about adjusting the cleat on the shoe.
__________________

Shimano : Click :: Campy :: Snap :: SRAM : Bang
IthaDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-12, 09:04 PM   #6
shadoman
Senior Member
 
shadoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: ChokeYa, Illinois
Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Triple, Schwinn Passage, Raleigh Tech 420, Viner Road Record, Soma Sport, Schwinn Tempo, Bianchi Nuevo Alloro, Takara Prestige SS, Diamondback Outlook
Posts: 546
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i've used my Look Deltas with 4 different shoes and always managed to get my shoe to actually touch the cranks, actually had to back it off a smidge.
shadoman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-12, 10:05 PM   #7
Bat56
Senior Member
 
Bat56's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: St.Paul, MN
Bikes:
Posts: 1,737
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
You guys are talking about angle of attack, side to side movement...

I use SPD cleats. When I bolt to cleat to my shoe I can adjust it:

Fore and aft
side to side
angle. I can bolt the cleat down so that when engaged my toe is pointing in towards the bike or bolt it so my toe points away from the bike.

Once the cleat is bolted tight and the cleat is engaged in the pedal I get about 3-6mm of float. Not slop. The multirelease cleat is a bit different.
Bat56 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-12, 10:11 PM   #8
bfloyd6969
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: central Ohio
Bikes: Schwinn Madison, Windsor Dover
Posts: 926
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for the info., all. I'll look (no punn intended) into the Deltas...

Edit - I looked on the Look site and it shows the Delta only in cleats. Would the Keo's be similar in as much side to side adjustment as the Deltas? Thanks.
bfloyd6969 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-12, 10:16 PM   #9
bfloyd6969
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: central Ohio
Bikes: Schwinn Madison, Windsor Dover
Posts: 926
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes, my Shimano spd's also have some side to side adjustability, but not enough for me to get my shoe as close to the crank arm as I like - at least not with the Time shoes that I currently have.
bfloyd6969 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:48 PM.