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Thread: Test ride

  1. #1
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    Test ride

    I took my newly SS'ed mountain bike out for a little test run today. I have not yet gotten the tools I need from Nashbar to finish it completely, I am still waiting on a cassette tool and a chain tool to break apart the cassette for the 18t cog I'll be using. But, I set the derailluer right where it holds the chainline as close to perfect as it's gonna get, which lands it on the 14t rear cog. I used the 32t chainring, and got some spacers to hold the whole mess together, so the front end is squared away. On the ride, I wheeled the bike over to an old landfill on campus that gives about a 30 foot rise to do some short climbs. It climbs okay, a little stiff, but that will be better once I have it set at 32x18. The best part is the noticeably lighter weight and the simple beauty of seeing a set of handlebars with only brake levers. I can't wait to finish it and get it on the trail! It only threw the chain once, that happened going down some stairs. I think this will be completely eliminated when I take some links out of the chain to get the derailluer to provide more tension to hold the chain on.

    Aside: I have heard that there are rivets or bolts that hold the whole cassette together. Is this true and how do I go about breaking it apart?

  2. #2
    seeking simple
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    I used my Dremel, but that may have been with a freewheel. (Freewheels DO come apart, if you're determined enough!)

  3. #3
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    I was going to go the more tactful route, and use a hammer and drive punch to tap them out (if they're rivets). Me+Dremel=mess, so I better not.

  4. #4
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    The punch and BFH (big fuc_king hammer) hammer works well, but some times those little rivets are tough little buggers to come out, so you may have to file off the 'head' of the rivet first, before you do any pounding. Just touch a dremel or anle grinder to them, or a few minutes with a hand file will get them off.

  5. #5
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    If its a higher end cassette (SRAM PG-970), will they be bolts? I have looked into it a little, and it seems that some are rivets, some are bolts.

  6. #6
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    Its completely finished, now it is running a 32x18 which is perfect (I did the same little 30 foot climbs on this test ride), and I couldn't be happier. It is now substantially lighter without the 8 unneeded gears on the cassette. Sunday will most likely be the trail test for it, the trail will be the Potawatomi in Michigan. Can't wait!!

  7. #7
    aspiring dirtbag commuter max-a-mill's Avatar
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    i highly recommend spending the four-fifty on a shimano DX cog instead of using the right sized cassette cog. if you don't do it now, think about it after your chain pops off on you at the worst possbile moment sometime.

    i know realizing it earlier would have kept me off from sliding on the street twice due to a dropped chain on my first converted roadie.

    the same dx cog is still going strong! cheapest most worthwile piece of bike equipment ever for the homemade SS convert!
    - the revolution will not be motorized -

  8. #8
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    It should be cool for now. The cog has a minute amount of play in it that keeps it centered with the chain (it wiggles almost imperceptably) On the test ride, I threw everything I could think of at it, like hopping logs and rocks (just in and around campus) and dropping stairs and ledges, as well as short, steep climbs and 120+ rpm spin-fests, and no problems. Sunday will be the true test, though.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by max-a-mill
    i highly recommend spending the four-fifty on a shimano DX cog instead of using the right sized cassette cog. if you don't do it now, think about it after your chain pops off on you at the worst possbile moment sometime.

    i know realizing it earlier would have kept me off from sliding on the street twice due to a dropped chain on my first converted roadie.

    the same dx cog is still going strong! cheapest most worthwile piece of bike equipment ever for the homemade SS convert!
    i second this. they're non-ramped, which will help keep the chain in place. i had a major stack thanks to throwing the chain when my mtb was single speed using the ramped 16t out of the cassette.

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