Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-08-14, 12:00 AM   #1
Dannihilator
User Title
Thread Starter
 
Dannihilator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Annandale, New Jersey
Bikes: 2014 Surly Steamroller, 1989 Nishiki Altron
Posts: 19,419
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Surly Dingle Cog: Impressions.

Had initially went with this setup thinking it would be a good setup around here and the idea intrigued me. So before I order the parts necessary to do this I read up on it on surly's website. They it was explained that if you had kept it with a two tooth difference, you wouldn't have to change wheel position.* Also recommended the use of a 9 speed chain with the setup and to use their lockring for the added protection against stripping the hub(already was running a surly lockring) and chainring bolts for a double. OK, get the stuff ordered and once everything arrived went to install the parts crankset no problem at all, dingle cog threads on no problem at all. The problem was the surly lockring, thing was too thick for the setup and had so much overhang that I didn't trust it and put on a dura ace lockring instead, which fit the hub perfectly.

Advice to those who want to try this: get a tensioner if you're going to run this setup, it does make it easier on the road to get chain tensioned properly.

With that now out of the way, time to ride. Start out in the 46x17 gearing, stop a bit before the first big climb to change to the 44x19 setup. This is where the asterisk comes into play here, hub is not centered in the dropouts when the chain is tensioned perfectly. So besides the claim you don't have to change wheel position when you maintain the two tooth difference, you do have to change the wheel position.* Not that big of a deal, it has made it easier to climb, by all of 2 mph. Gives a good chainline and is silent.

Now that I've had a couple of months on this setup, now know to run a dry lube. Even with that you get to the second asterisk, your hands are going to get dirty even with the dry lube. Only way to avoid is to run it sans chain lube, which isn't good for the drivetrain. Also had the great pleasure of getting a small piece of debris lodged between the 17t and 19t in such a way that it wouldn't let the chain sit on the cog correctly. Plus the 9 speed is a bit unnerving on a fixed setting have a disliking of shimano connecting pins. That leaves you with the choice of permanently fixing the chain together, which isn't recommended on a modern chain or using a quicklink which the 9 speed type isn't overly confidence inspiring.

Overall, do I like the setup: It's just ok. Would I run a setup like this again: hell no. Would I recommend it to someone else: probably not, but feel free to try it if you want to.
__________________
Signature.
Dannihilator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-14, 12:21 AM   #2
Huffandstuff
Senior Member
 
Huffandstuff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Portland, OR
Bikes: I got bikes.
Posts: 1,759
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
I personally feel like the dingle cog is only useful people with a single sided fixed hub. Fixed/Fixed with a 17 and 19 on each side does the exact same job while running an 1/8th inch chain which allows for better 144BCD chainring options.
Huffandstuff is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-14, 03:28 AM   #3
europa
Grumpy Old Bugga
 
europa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Bikes: Europa, Hillbrick, Road Chief, Repco Superlite (Ol' Rusty)
Posts: 3,328
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've considered the dingle cog in the past, but always felt it was just a messy way of achieving something. Had I known about the chain issues, I wouldn't have given it as much consideration as I did.
I eventually went for the S3X which is a much neater solution and gives you a genuine spread of gears which can be changed on the move. The downsides are weight (it's all in the hub so it's only weight you're carrying, not effective rotational weight and when you're my size, it's a minor weight gain), expense and some truly bizarre availability from Sturmey Archer.
europa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-14, 07:36 AM   #4
mconlonx 
Nobody
 
mconlonx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 7,096
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 271 Post(s)
I just outfitted a bike with dingle setup. 17/21, 46/42.

Not because I think I'll use it on the go -- swapping out mid-ride for a hill -- more just to figure out what gearing will work for me on the road. Once that's dialed in, I'll sell parts and go with the right single cog/chainring setup.
__________________
I know next to nothing. I am frequently wrong.
mconlonx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-14, 10:19 AM   #5
plowmanjoe
Senior Member
 
plowmanjoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: NYC
Bikes: Cinelli Vigorelli
Posts: 482
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mconlonx View Post
I just outfitted a bike with dingle setup. 17/21, 46/42.

Not because I think I'll use it on the go -- swapping out mid-ride for a hill -- more just to figure out what gearing will work for me on the road. Once that's dialed in, I'll sell parts and go with the right single cog/chainring setup.
why didn't you just get different cog sizes and dial it in using normal parts? it's good to have different sized cogs around anyways and you wouldn't have to worry about selling something just to learn what gear you prefer.
plowmanjoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-14, 05:47 PM   #6
mconlonx 
Nobody
 
mconlonx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 7,096
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 271 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by plowmanjoe View Post
why didn't you just get different cog sizes and dial it in using normal parts? it's good to have different sized cogs around anyways and you wouldn't have to worry about selling something just to learn what gear you prefer.
'Cause I'm an idiot magpie who likes shiny, strange objects. Duh.

Plus in a pinch, I can opt for lower gears.

Always loved the idea, but after setting it up, unsure. OP doesn't inspire faith, either.

I'm running 46/21 on the rollers; still too black icy around here to take to the streets.

Plus, I buy at shop cost pricing--I can sell used what I have into it. Why not f' around with something I've been curious about forever?
__________________
I know next to nothing. I am frequently wrong.
mconlonx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-14, 06:26 PM   #7
Philasteve
Senior Member
 
Philasteve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 1,186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
After reading this I don't think I would every buy one. I really did think about it at one point, but just getting a fixed/fixed rear wheel is what i'm going to do with my next wheelset.
Philasteve is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:00 PM.