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Old 08-06-12, 03:51 PM   #1
zenout
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Anyone use tacx?

Fed up with my carbon on carbon seat post slip and could not figure out why my knees were hurting so much last week.It must have been slipping very slowly because it took aching knees to make me realize something was up.I know its odd to not of noticed it right off but the fact is i didn't.Yes, that's a bit embarrassing.Lesson learned.Ive been using the right torque key as well.I tried putting some electrical tape on the stem too, no luck at all.Today i ordered on line tacx.How do i apply it?The night before my ride or the day of?Any tips and im grateful.Thanks all.
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Old 08-06-12, 04:03 PM   #2
calamarichris
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Assuming you're talking about friction paste, I'd install it immediately after wiping off whatever grease or grime you have on there.
It should be fairly permanent and you don't have to keep reapplying it.
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Old 08-06-12, 04:07 PM   #3
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You mean that carbon assembly paste? Yes! Technically, you don't need it if your frame is also carbon, but I put some in anyway. My post doesn't slip. I don't think it's surprising you didn't notice at all, especially if it was happening over a long period of time.

By the way, Lennard Zinn says the worst case scenario for a seat bolt is stripping the threads if you over tighten it, even with a carbon seat post. (assuming it fits correctly) so don't be shy about tightening that bolt.

http://velonews.competitor.com/2007/...t-worked_11851
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Old 08-06-12, 04:18 PM   #4
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thank you
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Old 08-06-12, 04:18 PM   #5
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I appreciate it.
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Old 08-06-12, 05:30 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
You mean that carbon assembly paste? Yes! Technically, you don't need it if your frame is also carbon, but I put some in anyway. My post doesn't slip. I don't think it's surprising you didn't notice at all, especially if it was happening over a long period of time.

By the way, Lennard Zinn says the worst case scenario for a seat bolt is stripping the threads if you over tighten it, even with a carbon seat post. (assuming it fits correctly) so don't be shy about tightening that bolt.

http://velonews.competitor.com/2007/...t-worked_11851
Leonard Zinn is wrong!

The worst thing that can happen if you overtorque a seatpost clamp bolt is the frame can be cracked (if the frame design did not take that into consideration), the second worst thing is that you can crack your seatpost clamp (which has happened to me). And that second one resulted because the frame, around the seatpost, was designed for that. The most inconsequential is actually stripping the bolt.

My advice is to use carbon paste, if appropriate, grease the seatpost clamp bolt, use a torque wrench or use the least amount of torque to actually hold the seatpost in place. I put a little red tape as marker on my seatpost to watch for slips, but none since I've been doing it a long time ago.
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Last edited by Jed19; 08-06-12 at 05:34 PM.
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Old 08-06-12, 09:16 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jed19 View Post
My advice is to use carbon paste, if appropriate, grease the seatpost clamp bolt, use a torque wrench or use the least amount of torque to actually hold the seatpost in place. I put a little red tape as marker on my seatpost to watch for slips, but none since I've been doing it a long time ago.
I can't think of a time when it will be appropriate to grease the threads. If the threads are greased, you will be able to turn the fastener a good deal farther before the torque wrench pops. Just clean the threads, and if you want to seal the threads from moisture or rust, just use a minimum-strength, frequent-maintenance-type threadlock.
Sorry for picking nits, but I've damaged motorcycle parts by overtorquing after greasing the threads, even with a calibrated torque wrench.
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Old 08-07-12, 01:31 PM   #8
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I wonder if i damaged threads and i am using a torque wrench.
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