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Tandem Cycling A bicycle built for two. Want to find out more about this wonderful world of tandems? Check out this forum to talk with other tandem enthusiasts. Captains and stokers welcome!

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Old 02-10-07, 09:24 PM   #1
Duane
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Tandem Storage/Display Stand

OK, I've searched through the archives and seen plenty of discussions about kickstands. That's not what this is about. I'm looking for a way to support our Tandem when there's nothing to lean it against. I built a nice setup out of wood for my basement, but it weighs a ton and I really want something I can throw in the back of the Minivan and take with us (but not along on a ride). I saw the threads about workstands and that's a little more than I'm looking for. I was thinking about the kind of display stands you see in the bike shops, but wasn't sure if they'll support a tandem.

Any ideas?

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Old 02-10-07, 10:42 PM   #2
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Well...... I might suggest a Click-Stand.



Let me know what you think,
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Old 02-10-07, 11:38 PM   #3
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This is the SuperStand, there are probably many online retailers of it. The picture is a link from Precisiontandems.com. I have not used it; like you, I made something out of wood that screws into the wall where I keep it. Like you said, there is no way to put it into the car. In reference to the post above, I actually just order a click-stand. I will post a review of how well it works. I wonder how easily it could be knocked over by someone walking by or a very strong wind. I'll try it out and write a review when it comes in.

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Old 02-11-07, 06:35 AM   #4
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http://www.thegstand.com/








$20 at lots of on-line stores and some well stocked LBS's.
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Old 02-11-07, 07:23 AM   #5
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ULTIMATE Rakk Storage Stand

Works like a charm...
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Old 02-11-07, 09:47 AM   #6
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You'll see these used individually and in pairs; they're OK but not ideal.


I've got one of these that I use in the garage for Debbie's single bike, sold under the Pyramid name... again, it works but not ideal. They are flimsy and if your chain is in one of the larger cogs the supports will hit your rear derailleur.


-------------
As already suggested, the two-point systems that add bracing to the upper portion of the front or rear wheel provide for a far more stable arrangement for bikes and tandems and are the way to go if you feel you want or need a support stand next to your car.

Willworx SuperStand: I've seen these or at least something similar and like the simplicity.


Ultimate Bicycle Support RAKK: again, great design but a bit more bulky with some moving parts thrown in to the mix.



FWIW, when we got our first tandem back in '96 I was all hot-to-trot to get one of wheeled display stands after seeing them used by our tandem dealer to keep rolling stock standing upright and having it suggested that they were a good idea. The price seemed a bit high for what it was so, having already written a check for $3.4k when we'd only planned on looking, I opted to pass. We saw that quite a few folks who bought tandems from this dealer has the stands once we started getting out and meeting other team for group rides, but also saw that they were about the only ones using the stands. Everyone else did what we did... they just propped their tandems up against the side or back of their vehicles. I ultimately decided that it would just end up being another piece of equipment that I had to keep track of and mess around with at the begining and end of our ride and decided to pass. No regrets. Although, I would note that when we go to rallies or weekend get-togethers I throw my Ultimate work stand in the back of the truck in the event that I or anyone else need to tweak a tandem. There's no substitute for a workstand that firmly holds the rear wheel off the ground when you really need to work on a tandem.

For loaded touring, triplets or other tandems where kids need to be loaded or trailers hooked and unhooked, the bolt-on kickstands are the way to go. Their added weight is hardly an issue given all the other stuff that you're hauling and there's nothing to mess around with: it's always there and ready to flick into the down position.

Again, for us, I've never wanted for a kickstand or anything else. There's always a fence, wall, tree, another tandem or when all else fails I just lay the thing on the ground.

Last edited by TandemGeek; 02-11-07 at 10:02 AM.
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Old 02-11-07, 09:59 AM   #7
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I have one that holds the bike by the crankarm that doesn't have a chainring. It's a little more compact than most of the other selections and it holds the bike, even a tandem, more securely than any of the ones that were previously listed.

The bad news is that I don't know the name of the manufacturer and it doesn't have any identifying markings on it.
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Old 02-11-07, 10:22 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
The bad news is that I don't know the name of the manufacturer and it doesn't have any identifying markings on it.
There are a couple...

The Crank Stand marketed under a few different brand names...


The original was the "Standit"... which was even more simple than the Crank Stand; again, all black with a nice flat base and a powdercoated channel that you dropped the crank arm into.
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Old 02-11-07, 01:58 PM   #9
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Picked one of these up at Home Depot for about $25. Does a good job. You can see the specs here: http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS...4+4412&pos=n14

Just do a search for "bike" when you get there.
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Old 02-11-07, 04:15 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TandemGeek
For loaded touring, triplets or other tandems where kids need to be loaded or trailers hooked and unhooked, the bolt-on kickstands are the way to go.

With some trailers attached you can swing the bike around about 180 and lean the bike into the trailer as shown in the attached image.

Also, the kid can be a kickstand, i.e. "Here...hold the bike and don't let it fall". Only good for about 1-2 minutes though .
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Old 02-11-07, 06:54 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duane
I really want something I can throw in the back of the Minivan and take with us (but not along on a ride).
Any ideas?

Duane
Quote:
I've got one of these that I use in the garage for Debbie's single bike, sold under the Pyramid name... again, it works but not ideal. They are flimsy and if your chain is in one of the larger cogs the supports will hit your rear derailleur.
The "Grandstand" is less than ideal for sturdy storage or for holding the bike while doing serious maintenance, but I find it very handy in the van and at the ride start/finish.

Inside the van it holds the rear of the bike steady while a couple of straps hold the front end. At the pre-ride it supports the bike is secure enough, short term, while I top off tire pressure and load bottles and nutrition. It's never been knocked over and there are no scratches on the van from bikes leaning up against it.
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Old 02-12-07, 07:04 AM   #12
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Thanks for all the responses. I am thinking that the Ultimate Rakk stand is what I need. I understand about leaning the bike against the car, but when I look at the scratches from bikes on my older car I really don't want to duplicate them on my new Minivan.

I do have a workstand and agree that is really the way to go for any real adjustment.

Thanks again,

Duane
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Old 02-12-07, 07:38 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Duane
... but when I look at the scratches from bikes on my older car I really don't want to duplicate them on my new Minivan.
FWIW, since 1984 every truck or SUV that I've owned and used to haul bikes and tandems has been black and I'm pretty anal about maintaining the finish on my cars, motorcycles, and bikes, detailing a few times a year then following up with Zaino's polymer paint protectants.

To prevent the bikes from maring the finish of my "transporters" I've found there are a couple "tricks" that you can use to keep the saddle and handlebars from touching the painted sheet metal.

For putting a bike along side the vehicle I tuck the rear wheel of my bikes into the gap between the front of the vehicle's rear tire and the fender at about a 30* angle to vehicle with the upper part of the tire resting against the vehicle's tire: it makes for some pretty good "triangulation" and a firm stance even for our high profile, fat-tire Ventana off-road tandem.

For putting bikes at the back of the vehicle, I just lean my saddle (single bike) or Debbie's saddle (tandem) up against the plastic wrap-around rear/corner tail light assemblies or I'll just rest the cork-tape covered drop-bar handlebar ends up against the plastic bumper covers.

Knock-on wood, this has worked well and the occasional lapse where I'll rest a saddle against the sheet metal with the handlebars sticking out behind the vehicle doesn't usually leave any marks unless the finish is dirty and someone is getting in or out of the vehicle. Even then, those types of "dust scratches" buff out in about 2 minutes using a Porter Cable polisher with 3M or similar polishing compounds and an orange foam pad.
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Old 02-13-07, 10:49 PM   #14
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Click-Stand report:

I got the click-stand in the mail literally two days after I ordered it. It was sent same day (I didn't pay any extra or anything just quick shipping). Anyway, I took the bike off the trainer, put the elastic band on the front brake and set the click-stand up. I was really impressed that it held the bike so well. My triplet's top tube is rather low so I wondered about the center of gravity thing. Not a problem.

I probably wouldn't leave it on this stand in the garage for months, but it certainly seems sturdy enough for setting up while I'm getting my shoes and helmet on, while we take a lunch break, maybe overnight camping, etc. Although I haven't tried it outside yet, I don't think even a strong wind would blow it over.

I took a few pictures. You can't really see the length of the bike well, but the 11 foot, 60 pound bike is being help up very well.

I do not work for or am in any way related to the manufacturers
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Old 02-14-07, 04:22 AM   #15
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djembob02,

Any opinions on how the Click-Stand would work on a tandem loaded for touring? Our tandem with gear would weigh 90-100 pounds. The top tube (Cannondale RT1000) is higher than on your triplet.
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Old 02-14-07, 05:52 AM   #16
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Would probably work, but can't be certain. I am pretty sure it will work perfect for me touring with my two-wheeled trailer. I would think it would work for you but I'm not sure. When I contacted the company/manufacturer/individual, he discussed basically a kind of no obligation trial. I could try it out and if it didn't work, no problem, I could send it back and get a refund. For now, it seems to be a one person (or one family) operation with excellent customer service.

If you are interested, send him an e-mail, he'll probably work with you.
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Old 02-14-07, 06:11 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomn
Well...... I might suggest a Click-Stand.Let me know what you think
So, let me see if I have this straight. You've taken foldable walking sticks designed for the blind and had the vendor modify the the product by painting it black instead of white and red, and have replaced the coated handle and wrist strap with a rubber-strip coated, half-moon shaped "head"? Interesting adaptation.

Now, to use the thing, if I don't happen to have an Arai drag/parking brake I must first pull out my handy-dandy rubber do-hickey that I put around the brake lever and drop-bar to hold either the front or rear brake in the on position so the bike doesn't roll forward or backward... an age-old trick that's been done using cycling gloves when bicycles are leaned up against objects for the same reason.

Next, I find a something to lean my tandem up against or ask someone else to hold my tandem while I extract my 10" long folding walking cane, er... "click-stand" from where-ever I stow it, that is unless I get the more compact one that I can put in my rear jersey pocket.

Now, instead of propping my tandem up against a fence, tree, building or some other object so that it's out of the way of pedestrians I can now prop it up and block sidewalks as shown in your gallery?





When I come back, assuming someone hasn't tripped over the dark-colored "stick" while trying to walk around my propped-up tandem or, perhaps, having gone ahead and moved it up against the fence or building, I fold up and put away my walking cane, then remove and put away my brake clip, and I'm off?

Have I got this right?

Sorry, I'm still thinking that if someone has a tandem and needs something to hold it up while parked in the garage or basement, doing loaded touring, tending to stokids, etc., they're better off installing an ESGE/Pletscher Double-legged kickstand.

Last edited by TandemGeek; 02-14-07 at 07:06 AM.
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Old 02-14-07, 08:01 AM   #18
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<snip>
First the survey...and now this. Global warming is real. Move south Geek before it gets worse. I hear they're actually still riding bikes in Central America right now.
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Old 02-14-07, 08:32 AM   #19
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First the survey...and now this. Global warming is real. Move south Geek before it gets worse. I hear they're actually still riding bikes in Central America right now.
It's the 120 wpm curse, internet savvy, multi-tasking with multiple computers and wireless laptops sitting in strategic locations. Well, that and a low-threshold of tolerance for certain things.

It just looks like it takes more time and thought that I really put into it.
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Old 02-14-07, 09:09 AM   #20
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TG, we had this discussion before . Just use the search function
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Old 02-14-07, 11:08 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by transam
djembob02,

Any opinions on how the Click-Stand would work on a tandem loaded for touring? Our tandem with gear would weigh 90-100 pounds. The top tube (Cannondale RT1000) is higher than on your triplet.

Hi Transam,

I am sure that a Click-Stand would support a loaded touring tandem, but that would be the test wouldn't it. My loaded single weighed in at 70 pounds. Having a more typical top tube is really better. One of the most valuable features of the Click-Stand is that it supports your bike near the top, above the center of gravity. Last fall I toured the Oregon/California coast and met tourists that had broken three regular clamp on kickstands. Contacting the bike at the bottom of the frame makes them like a nut in a nutcracker.

What is the diameter of your Cannondale top tube? So far I can fit up to 1 5/8".

Thanks,
Tom
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Old 02-14-07, 12:08 PM   #22
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While we utilize no parking contrivance on our tandem, the Click-Stand looks like a neat alternative for folks who want a stabilizing device.
All methods of parking a tandem/bike have their pros and cons . . .

Pedal on TWOgether!
Rudy and Kay/zonatandem
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Old 02-14-07, 12:22 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TandemGeek
So, let me see if I have this straight. You've taken foldable walking sticks designed for the blind and had the vendor modify the the product by painting it black instead of white and red, and have replaced the coated handle and wrist strap with a rubber-strip coated, half-moon shaped "head"? Interesting adaptation.

Now, to use the thing, if I don't happen to have an Arai drag/parking brake I must first pull out my handy-dandy rubber do-hickey that I put around the brake lever and drop-bar to hold either the front or rear brake in the on position so the bike doesn't roll forward or backward... an age-old trick that's been done using cycling gloves when bicycles are leaned up against objects for the same reason.

Next, I find a something to lean my tandem up against or ask someone else to hold my tandem while I extract my 10" long folding walking cane, er... "click-stand" from where-ever I stow it, that is unless I get the more compact one that I can put in my rear jersey pocket.

Now, instead of propping my tandem up against a fence, tree, building or some other object so that it's out of the way of pedestrians I can now prop it up and block sidewalks as shown in your gallery?





When I come back, assuming someone hasn't tripped over the dark-colored "stick" while trying to walk around my propped-up tandem or, perhaps, having gone ahead and moved it up against the fence or building, I fold up and put away my walking cane, then remove and put away my brake clip, and I'm off?

Have I got this right?

Sorry, I'm still thinking that if someone has a tandem and needs something to hold it up while parked in the garage or basement, doing loaded touring, tending to stokids, etc., they're better off installing an ESGE/Pletscher Double-legged kickstand.


Hi TandemGeek,

Some of it you have right. My invention doesn't start out as a "walking stick for the blind"; it is made from expedition grade Easton aluminum tubing, more akin to tent poles. They are not painted, rather anodized black. I chose black for style, though I hadn't thought of making them a different color to be seen more easily.

I didn't invent the idea of applying your brakes while parking a bike; I just tried to come up with a nice adaptation. The "parking bands" cling to your handlebar when not in use, so they take little time or effort to apply.

When riding a single the process of propping up your bike: dismount; apply the parking bands; remove the Click-Stand from rack bag while bike leans against hip; stand clicks to full length as you hold the top; lean bike against Click-Stand, er... "walking stick". I have never timed it, but I bet it takes all of 15 seconds.

When on a tandem, finding someone to help you take the stand out of your rack bag usually isn't hard, just ask the person who rides behind you.

As for propping bikes in the way of pedestrians, I agree that it should not be done. In the first photo we are at a viewpoint and there really were no regular pedestrians, but we are hogging the sidewalk. In the second, the sidewalk in front of the restaurant is very wide, and we were out of the way. One way to keep the stand out of the way when parking is to lean it the other way, so that the Click-Stand is opposite foot traffic. Being able to lean your bike either way also comes in handy when parking on slopes. 1083 miles, no one ever complained, kicked our stands, or moved our bikes.

The comment about tending to stokids does have me concerned. I don't think that Click-Stands or kickstand should be used with the typical attached child seats that you see on singles. I would like to know more about how people ride with their children who pedal.

Click-Stands aren't everyone's cup of tea, but I think that they do have merit. Sorry to always be offering up my invention, but I can't help myself.


Tom
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Old 02-14-07, 03:36 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by tomn
The comment about tending to stokids does have me concerned. I don't think that Click-Stands or kickstand should be used with the typical attached child seats that you see on singles. I would like to know more about how people ride with their children who pedal.

Click-Stands aren't everyone's cup of tea, but I think that they do have merit.
I don't like the child seats, I prefer trailers or tag alongs if I can't use a stokid. My rule is kids are last ones on, first ones off if they can do it on their own. Otherwise, I lay the bike down and remove them from the trailer. By default if they can pedal on their own, they can dismount on their own.

It is a fine invention, something you can be proud of even if it is not to everyone's liking. If you wanted to shave a few seconds you could do a clickstand in conjunction with a flickstand. Do they even make those anymore?
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Old 02-14-07, 05:31 PM   #25
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Hi Transam,

I am sure that a Click-Stand would support a loaded touring tandem, but that would be the test wouldn't it. My loaded single weighed in at 70 pounds. Having a more typical top tube is really better. One of the most valuable features of the Click-Stand is that it supports your bike near the top, above the center of gravity. Last fall I toured the Oregon/California coast and met tourists that had broken three regular clamp on kickstands. Contacting the bike at the bottom of the frame makes them like a nut in a nutcracker.

What is the diameter of your Cannondale top tube? So far I can fit up to 1 5/8".

Thanks,
Tom
We have a Cannondale RT1000 with a top tube diameter of 1 5/8". My biggest concern is the click-stand supporting the weight of the bike to the point I can leave it and not worry about it falling. The old tried and tested method of leaning against whatever is available sounds best to me right now.
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