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  1. #1
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    Jack Taylor Tandem Seat Post Size ?

    Just acquired a '74 Jack Taylor Super Tourist Tandem. No size markings on the seatposts. I have measured them at 26.0 Is this correct?

    Thanks - Lorin

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Youdelr
    Just acquired a '74 Jack Taylor Super Tourist Tandem. No size markings on the seatposts. I have measured them at 26.0 Is this correct?

    Thanks - Lorin
    Did you use a good quality caliper? If so, then it is what it is...

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    Jack Taylor Super Tourist

    My 1975 orange Jack Taylor Super Tourist has a 27.0 diameter seat post.

  4. #4
    Dharma Dog lhbernhardt's Avatar
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    I can't speak for Jack Taylor tandems (which back in the 70's, prior to Santana, was pretty much the standard tandem everyone wanted), but when English-made frames flooded the North American bicycle market around 1972-74, a lot of them were complete crap. One way you could tell just how crappy an English-made frame was: measure the seat tube diameter. Reynoilds 531 db should be 27.2mm. If it's 26.8, the genius of a framebuilder put the seat mast in upside down.

    English-made motorcycles, with their vertically-split crankcases that leaked oil like crazy, were also losing market share to Japanese motorcycles at this time, too. Eventually, Triumphs, Nortons, and BSA's disappeared...

    L.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by lhbernhardt View Post
    I can't speak for Jack Taylor tandems (which back in the 70's, prior to Santana, was pretty much the standard tandem everyone wanted), but when English-made frames flooded the North American bicycle market around 1972-74, a lot of them were complete crap. One way you could tell just how crappy an English-made frame was: measure the seat tube diameter. Reynoilds 531 db should be 27.2mm. If it's 26.8, the genius of a framebuilder put the seat mast in upside down.

    English-made motorcycles, with their vertically-split crankcases that leaked oil like crazy, were also losing market share to Japanese motorcycles at this time, too. Eventually, Triumphs, Nortons, and BSA's disappeared...

    L.
    Thanks for the update. The 27.0 mm seat post in my Jack Taylor Touring single bicycle with Reynolds 531 db fits fine. Is there a market for selling Jack Taylor frames? Mine is about a 21" with aluminum fenders holding-up front and read panier racks.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by lhbernhardt View Post
    I can't speak for Jack Taylor tandems (which back in the 70's, prior to Santana, was pretty much the standard tandem everyone wanted), but when English-made frames flooded the North American bicycle market around 1972-74, a lot of them were complete crap. One way you could tell just how crappy an English-made frame was: measure the seat tube diameter. Reynoilds 531 db should be 27.2mm. If it's 26.8, the genius of a framebuilder put the seat mast in upside down.

    L.
    Regards the seat tube being used upside down. Another possibility;

    I ran into odd seat post measurements a few times on tandems and singles badged of R-531 tubing. While it is possible that the ST was used upsidedown, I think a plausable answer is that the builder just used a straight gauge tube and didn't ream it out, perhaps having some pins in stock that would fit. As stated, the building was frantic at that time and 10 minutes saved was important.

    If one finds the odd ST ID measurement at the top, would recommend pulling the bottom bracket and carefully measuring the ID of the ST just a bit up from the bottom. I remember measuring 2 or 3 such bikes and all of them were the same ID at both ends of the ST, showing that it was straight gauge hidding under "Double Butted Forks, Stays and Main Tubes decals". Of course a DB tube might also have been used. I never was able to determine if the actual tube I ran into was Reynolds, Columbus or just good old Chomo, but they were all seamless. I always checked bikes during that era for welded/seamed tubes as we had found a good number of them wearing fancy decals and pricetags.

    /k

  7. #7
    Nigel nfmisso's Avatar
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    "Reynolds and the Taylors had a close relationship, and Reynolds actually produced custom plain-gauge 531 tandem tubes, and double-butted curved tubes, for the marque. The tubesets may have been initially exclusive to the Taylors (they may have owned the tooling2), but as early as the late 1970s (as Taylor business slowed and extra tubesets sat in stock at Reynolds), they were available for purchase by other framebuilders3. Alex Singer may have used Taylor fork blades (and possibly other tubes as well) for their tandems4 - Ken Taylor has verified that some tubesets were sold to French builders5."

    from: http://www.blackbirdsf.org/taylor/

    Jack Taylor generally used plain gauge 531 for their tandems.

    Jack Taylor bikes were all custom built to order by the '70's - no flooding of the market.
    Nigel
    Mechanical Design Engineer

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by nfmisso View Post
    "Reynolds and the Taylors had a close relationship, and Reynolds actually produced custom plain-gauge 531 tandem tubes, and double-butted curved tubes, for the marque. The tubesets may have been initially exclusive to the Taylors (they may have owned the tooling2), but as early as the late 1970s (as Taylor business slowed and extra tubesets sat in stock at Reynolds), they were available for purchase by other framebuilders3. Alex Singer may have used Taylor fork blades (and possibly other tubes as well) for their tandems4 - Ken Taylor has verified that some tubesets were sold to French builders5."

    from: http://www.blackbirdsf.org/taylor/

    Jack Taylor generally used plain gauge 531 for their tandems.

    Jack Taylor bikes were all custom built to order by the '70's - no flooding of the market.
    nfmisso; I believe I would have to disagree with the idea that the Taylor specific, tandem oriented Reynolds 531 tubesets were plain/straight gauge vice being butted tubes. I have pinged the tubes on a number of Taylor tandems to confirm all were clearly butted tubes.

    And although I personally not in possession of any evidence that any of them being produced for Taylor use were straight gauge, I have found a few contrary examples of decals on known Taylors which did not include the word "butted" one or on all the decals. Two examples of each case are below;

    Decal - Reynolds 531 Butted Tandem Tubes Decal - Copy.jpg -- Decal - Reynolds Marathon 531 Tandem Tubing on a Taylor - 226178648.jpg --Decal - Reynolds 531 downtube one - 7.jpg -- Decal - 531 Reynolds Tandem Tubing Downtube - found clean on a Taylor 2bike 8635_ht.jpg -- DECAL - Tandem Tubing - R531, MP5Y!~~60_57.jpg

    Likewise, somewhere in the internet ozone is a listing (remember the source was Ken) of the other builders who are known to have used the proper Taylor-Reynolds tandem tubesets with permission... I believe all were builders who had apprenticed with the Taylors (Colin Lange, etc.)(if anyone has a copy; please post it).

    When it comes to Reynolds tubes sold to the French builders, I don't doubt that at all...as "business is business" and when the Taylors began to slow down they probably would not have been needing as many sets as their original production contract at Reynolds would have covered. The excess tubes would have had to be disposed of.

    An interesting thread. Gap filling and/or corrections welcomed.

    fwiw;
    /k

  9. #9
    Senior Member obrentharris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Youdelr View Post
    Just acquired a '74 Jack Taylor Super Tourist Tandem. No size markings on the seatposts. I have measured them at 26.0 Is this correct?

    Thanks - Lorin
    I wouldn't trust the sizes of the seat posts. A previous owner may have put in the wrong sized posts. Take a close look at the slots in the seat tubes at the seat clamps. If they are pinched in (narrower) at the top the seatposts are incorrectly sized. Better to measure the inside diameter of the seat tubes themselves below the slot. Most bike shops can do this for you if you don't have the calipers or step-taper gauge to measure them yourself.
    Brent

  10. #10
    Senior Member obrentharris's Avatar
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    Silly me; replying to a 6 1/2 year old question!
    Brent

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