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Tandem Cycling A bicycle built for two. Want to find out more about this wonderful world of tandems? Check out this forum to talk with other tandem enthusiasts. Captains and stokers welcome!

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Old 07-29-07, 04:39 PM   #1
malkin
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Repair stand for tandem

Requirements?
Recommendations?


Thanks!
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Old 07-29-07, 04:55 PM   #2
TandemGeek
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This thread -- although a bit edgy in a few spots -- might be of interest:
Work Stand
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Old 07-29-07, 05:01 PM   #3
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Requirements: must be abe to accomodate tandem's weight/size.
Clamp must be able to rotate; adjustable height is important; foldable/adjustable leg spread; some accessories may prove useful: attached toolbox, scale, bar-holder to keep front wheel from flapping around, etc.
We use/recommend Ultimate repair stand (will hold up to 85 lbs); have assembled/worked on over a hundred tandems with this stand.
Price has come down a bit. Used to be well over $200, but have seen new models as low as $139.
If you're going to do a bike/tandem/adjustments a good stand is a great investment.
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Old 07-29-07, 05:03 PM   #4
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You guys rock!
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Old 07-29-07, 05:06 PM   #5
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I mean, ROLL!
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Old 07-29-07, 07:07 PM   #6
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Since I had some time to kill before the final stage of the Tour began, I took a few photos and made a couple quick videos regarding tandems and workstands. The videos are highly compressed short clips intended only to eliminate any doubt about how easy it is to put a tandem in a workstand. The photos linked from the thumbnails at the bottom are much higher quality and provide some of the details that you can't see in the videos.

This video shows the simple yet most secure way to attach a tandem to a Park consumer workstand to perform almost all forms of maintenance on a fully-assembled tandem. By using the stoker's seatpost you preclude damage to the sometimes delicate top tube or seat tube(s) if the seatpost doesn't happen to be as deep in the tube as your clamping point. Also, by only elevating the rear wheel of the tandem most of the tandem's weight remains on the front wheel sitting on the ground, which provides a substantial amount of additional stability.

In the series of photo's below you'll see one where a short step ladder is placed under the front bottom bracket / eccentric shell which allows you to retain that additional stability while working on the front end of the bike. A 5 gal. bucket works equally as well. However, be careful not to knock the tandem off of the step ladder or bucket while the front wheel is removed as you can do some permanent damage to your fork's drop-outs. The latter is why I prefer to use step ladders so that I can run a strap through the front timing ring and the top of the ladder to keep everything safe, having learned the hard way that the aluminum drop-outs in carbon forks can be replaced.

This video shows the same simple way to attach a tandem to the Ultimate Pro workstand: same technique with a different clamp attachment method.

OK, on to the photos. What you are seeing in the videos and photos are the following two workstands:

1. A 20 year-old Park consumer workstand (a model that was discontinued many years ago) which is a testament to the value that a good workstand represents...

2. A 5 year old Ultimate Pro workstand, pre-push button style. This has proven to be an outstanding workstand for both home and away from home.

Photos:

1. The first photo shows how the tandem sits clamped by the stoker's seatpost. Note: You will probably need to raise your stoker's saddle to expose enough seat post for your clamp. If so, you might want to put a narrow strip of electrician's tape around the seatpost where it enters the seat tube mast so that you don't lose your stoker's saddle height.

2. The second photo shows the aforementioned technique for elevating the front of the tandem if you need to do work on the front wheel, brakes, or headset that can't be performed with the front wheel resting on the floor/ground.

3. The third photo shows the Park & Ultimate Pro workstands side-by-side.

4. The fourth photo shows how a single bike can be put on the Ultimate workstand so that you can work on the drivetrain while standing (note that the legs are positioned differently than they were for the tandem to provide maximum stablity for the different work configurations).

5. The last photo shows the bagged Ultimate ready for a road trip propped up against the somewhat heavy, home-bound park workstand.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg ParkPS1.jpg (35.0 KB, 71 views)
File Type: jpg frontwork.jpg (31.2 KB, 76 views)
File Type: jpg bothstands.jpg (26.5 KB, 54 views)
File Type: jpg single_ultimate.jpg (32.5 KB, 66 views)
File Type: jpg workstands.jpg (23.3 KB, 42 views)

Last edited by TandemGeek; 07-29-07 at 09:50 PM.
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Old 08-08-07, 11:41 AM   #7
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I know this thread is a week and a half old but I wanted to add my 2 cents. I attached an old drop bar in my repair stand to use as a hook. It will hold most bikes in a pinch for minor repairs. The downside is that it will not hold the bike real steady. Works great for minor stuff though.
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