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Tandem Cycling A bicycle built for two. Want to find out more about this wonderful world of tandems? Check out this forum to talk with other tandem enthusiasts. Captains and stokers welcome!

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Old 05-20-08, 04:39 PM   #1
sweetnsourbkr
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Rolf Prima Tandem disc wheels

My question relates to the disc brake mounting system.

Because the 6-bolt rotor adapter is a thread-on piece, how can one be sure it won't get overtorqued, and thus strip the threads during hard braking?
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Old 05-21-08, 05:24 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetnsourbkr View Post
My question relates to the disc brake mounting system.

Because the 6-bolt rotor adapter is a thread-on piece, how can one be sure it won't get overtorqued, and thus strip the threads during hard braking?
Since the earliest days of chain-drive bicycles, the single-speed rear cogs have been screwed onto the rear hub and continue to be that way on most current track bikes, either directly or via a thread-on quick-change cog carrier. This method of fixing individual cogs and, later with multiple cogs when the rear derailleur was introduced, was eventually replaced by thread-on freewheels that were used for decades before the introduction of the splined cassette hub and cassettes in the 70's that you may be more familiar with.

Although I haven't asked, I strongly suspect basic engineering data regarding the load carrying capacity of different thread types and materials coupled with the vast history and experience gained with these thread-on drive-side cogs and freewheels -- to include the very high torque-generating touring-range freewheels -- was the basis for determining rear-wheel braking forces could also be handled by rear-wheel mounted thread-on drum brakes and disc rotors.

The bigger issue with these thread-on disc rotor adapters can be getting them back off if they are not installed using waterproof grease or anti-seize compound on the threads or routinely removed as part of a periodic maintenance regime.

Last edited by TandemGeek; 05-21-08 at 06:01 AM.
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Old 05-21-08, 04:16 PM   #3
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Thanks for the insight, TG. I was wondering if any Rolf wheel owners had any issues with them.
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Old 05-22-08, 12:35 PM   #4
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hi, We have been using a disc brake with our Rolf wheels with no trouble whats so ever, as far as braking. As already noted, the problem is trying to get it off. The hub recently broke at a spoke hole, and is now at Rolf to replace. The first thing I will do when it comes back will to put some anti-seize on the threads and get rid of the set screw.
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Old 05-22-08, 05:03 PM   #5
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So there's a set screw? That's probably the mechanical means to keep it in place. I wonder if Rolf requires/recommends a specific type of Loctite to be used on those threads. How many miles do you have on those wheels, mikeybikey101?
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Old 05-22-08, 08:37 PM   #6
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There is a set screw, but to me it is superfluous. It will just mash the fine threads, and make removal even harder. Believe me, you don't need loctite. You need anti-seize. This thing will lock up on its own. I had around 6600 miles before I sent it in. I didn't have an industrial vise mounted to a heavy bench, therefore my efforts to get it off with a large wrench were ineffectual. If my thinking is correct, applying the brake just makes this thing tighter.
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Old 05-22-08, 09:23 PM   #7
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To get mine off I used a very large pipe wrench. I wrapped a several layers of rag around the adapter to keep the wrench's teeth from mauling it. I never did understand why there is a set screw.
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Old 05-23-08, 07:49 PM   #8
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Thanks for the insight, guys.
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