Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Tandem Cycling A bicycle built for two. Want to find out more about this wonderful world of tandems? Check out this forum to talk with other tandem enthusiasts. Captains and stokers welcome!

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-06-04, 01:41 PM   #1
jeff williams
I couldn't car less.
Thread Starter
 
jeff williams's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Bikes: Ritchey P-series prototype, Diamondback, Nishiki Triathelon Pro.
Posts: 4,395
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
140 mm axle dishing question?

Please read this post and reply if you have info. 140 mm rear axle, 7cogset, mountain bike. Thanks
>jef.

bent rim, mechanics fault in dishing wheel?
jeff williams is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-04, 02:04 PM   #2
TandemGeek
hors category
 
TandemGeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Bikes:
Posts: 7,212
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
A photo would help...

I'm not exactly sure I understand everything that you've described but "dishing" is pretty straight forward. You center the rim to the hub's axle ends (period) and, presuming the frame is straight, you end up with the rim centered in the rear triangle.

While it's possible to get a dishless 145mm rear wheel, anything less than that will usually be dished on the drive side UNLESS you use one of the newer off-set rims from Velocity or Ritchey.

As for rims that taco, if the tension isn't quite right it doesn't take much for them to go out of whack. I can vividly recall taco'ing one of my first wheel efforts while simply unloading the tension on the spokes during the build. Out in the wild, I've seen quite a few rims taco'd or severly out of true due to a single spoke failure (pull-though or breakage) that occured during an impact.
TandemGeek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-04, 02:10 PM   #3
jeff williams
I couldn't car less.
Thread Starter
 
jeff williams's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Bikes: Ritchey P-series prototype, Diamondback, Nishiki Triathelon Pro.
Posts: 4,395
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by livngood
A photo would help...

I'm not exactly sure I understand everything that you've described but "dishing" is pretty straight forward. You center the rim to the hub's axle ends (period) and, presuming the frame is straight, you end up with the rim centered in the rear triangle.

While it's possible to get a dishless 145mm rear wheel, anything less than that will usually be dished on the drive side UNLESS you use one of the newer off-set rims from Velocity or Ritchey.

As for rims that taco, if the tension isn't quite right it doesn't take much for them to go out of whack. I can vividly recall taco'ing one of my first wheel efforts while simply unloading the tension on the spokes during the build. Out in the wild, I've seen quite a few rims taco'd or severly out of true due to a single spoke failure (pull-though or breakage) that occured during an impact.
HEY, thanks..RITCHEY BIKE FRAME. HE put this axle in and was dished to not be flat\ inline the side the cogset is on. I think it's the longer hub used for 7 cogset that is the problem.

i have to leave to go see the mech in minutes, I'm kinda freaked.
Jef.
jeff williams is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-04, 12:51 PM   #4
madpogue
My own worst nightmare
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Madison, WI USA
Bikes:
Posts: 1,237
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well, to be exact, you center the rim between the locknuts. You may have more axle sticking out of one locknut than the other. If so, and you center on the ends of the axle, the rim will not be centered in the stays. If you center the rim between the locknuts, which is where the stays (well, the dropouts) grab the hub, and the stays are straight, the rim will be centered.
madpogue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-04, 02:58 PM   #5
TandemGeek
hors category
 
TandemGeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Bikes:
Posts: 7,212
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Pardon me for generalizing. Fortunately, self-centering truing stands and dishing tools eliminate the need to think too hard about axle vs locknuts, as do most newer machined axle components.

Admittedly, a 7 speed hub and freewheel would most likely have a threaded axle which could be a few mm off dead center if it uses a QR (more if it is a bolt-on solid axle) so making the distinction was most certainly worthy of note.
TandemGeek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-04, 12:00 AM   #6
madpogue
My own worst nightmare
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Madison, WI USA
Bikes:
Posts: 1,237
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by livngood
Pardon me for generalizing. Fortunately, self-centering truing stands and dishing tools eliminate the need to think too hard about axle vs locknuts, as do most newer machined axle components.

Admittedly, a 7 speed hub and freewheel would most likely have a threaded axle which could be a few mm off dead center if it uses a QR (more if it is a bolt-on solid axle) so making the distinction was most certainly worthy of note.
True, even an old-fashioned rim-centering gauge works off the locknut face. But the original post is about a 7-speed, so I just assumed it was a threaded axle.
madpogue is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:49 PM.