Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 39 of 39
  1. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Florida
    My Bikes
    not enough
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by oldacura View Post
    I was given a "factory tour" by Dave - one of the Paketa founders. He lives (or lived) about 2 miles from me. About 2 years ago it was in a barn in Lafayette, Colorado. I think they may have since expanded to larger facilities. They basically just found a company that will extrude magnesium using custom dies, order the tubing, cut to length, cope the ends and weld in a jig. Really no different from aluminum or steel. Pretty neat to see low-volume manufacturing still surviving in the US.
    I know they're moving to a new facility soon.

    Nothing like a good old fashion hand built frame. You can feel the love JP puts into each bike he builds.

  2. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    UK
    My Bikes
    Canyon Dura ace, Pinarello Asolo Super Record, Holdsworth Nuovo Record, Ibis Tandem, Brompton
    Posts
    81
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Heat issues in descents

    Quote Originally Posted by swamptandem View Post
    The 420s are great! I think the spoke count is 18 and 24. It's not the spoke count that makes these so strong and stiff. It's the 34mm deep aluminum rim. Also, the deep rim acts as a heat sink for descending. A lot of Paketa tandems (with 300 lb + teams) are using the AC 420s with great success.
    Never thought of this idea - that deep rims are more effective heat sinks. Anyone got any more data on this - i would really like to believe that this is true - even anecdotal comments ok. Tandem wheel overheating = major worry of mine using rim brakes (no drum or disc brake on our racing Tandem - only Mafac canti brakes)

    T

  3. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    UK
    My Bikes
    Canyon Dura ace, Pinarello Asolo Super Record, Holdsworth Nuovo Record, Ibis Tandem, Brompton
    Posts
    81
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    V2r and hills

    Quote Originally Posted by swamptandem View Post
    Hi, thanks! The other bike were singles. My wife and I are not big powerhouses. I'm 146lbs,and she is 106lbs. A good bike, wheels and tires really do help.

    There was a rotation. But we were able to do a lion's share of the work. I guess it's a tandem thing.
    I am seriously looking at the V2r and really like the right side timing and double set up. I wondered how you were getting on with the gearing and hills? We are probably a tad heavier 268lbs and currently ride a Rondinella (1970's vintage) which is a lot heavier (>20kg or >44lbs) and has limited gearing with a TA 38/48 double chainset and a 12-32 cassette. We can cope with 10% gradients for extended periods at 40-50 cadence, but much beyond this for longer than bursts of 2-300m at up to 15% can't be sustained - you end up going anaerobic and eventually succumb as the effort sucks the energy from your legs. Our only solution presently is to swap the front chianrings for a 40/28 set up and cope with the hills but spin out easily on the flat. I was hoping that a combination of lower gearing, more modern front chainset design with a wider gear spacing and lighter weight might just enable us to cope with the 2-3km "tricky" 14-16% stuff we see in the Alps, without resorting to a triple and without spinning out. Thoughts/experiences? Tony

  4. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    119
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sweet ride.

  5. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Florida
    My Bikes
    not enough
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by barkersoldbean View Post
    I am seriously looking at the V2r and really like the right side timing and double set up. I wondered how you were getting on with the gearing and hills? We are probably a tad heavier 268lbs and currently ride a Rondinella (1970's vintage) which is a lot heavier (>20kg or >44lbs) and has limited gearing with a TA 38/48 double chainset and a 12-32 cassette. We can cope with 10% gradients for extended periods at 40-50 cadence, but much beyond this for longer than bursts of 2-300m at up to 15% can't be sustained - you end up going anaerobic and eventually succumb as the effort sucks the energy from your legs. Our only solution presently is to swap the front chianrings for a 40/28 set up and cope with the hills but spin out easily on the flat. I was hoping that a combination of lower gearing, more modern front chainset design with a wider gear spacing and lighter weight might just enable us to cope with the 2-3km "tricky" 14-16% stuff we see in the Alps, without resorting to a triple and without spinning out. Thoughts/experiences? Tony
    We live in Jacksonville,Fl. No real hills yet. We do plan on going to north Georgia soon for some hill riding. I did do the math before we bought this bike. I don't see a problem with gearing. You can get all the way down to a 36t on the rear cassette these days.

    If you have any questions about climbing on the V2r, call Dave at Paketa. He and his wife live in Colorado and ride their V2r in the mountains every day.

    Also, if you're not sure about a double. You can always opt for the V2. The mag frame is fantastic!

    Good luck!

  6. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    UK
    My Bikes
    Canyon Dura ace, Pinarello Asolo Super Record, Holdsworth Nuovo Record, Ibis Tandem, Brompton
    Posts
    81
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Many thanks for the reply - i have put this question directly to Dave Walker and will wait for his response - you are right the V2 with a triple is the obvious compromise - i just really like the right side timing belt!
    Tony

  7. #32
    Senior Member Turbotandem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    My Bikes
    Paketa V2r di2, C-Dale MT 3000, Teesdale, 1963 Huffy Daisey
    Posts
    165
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Fast tandems caught my eye.
    Fastest tandem in the tandem field on this years Haystack Time Trial in Boulder CO was Greg and Lisa Mangus, 16.4mi course in 36:35 per the ACA results page. That's 26.8mph. The lead peloton of 7 tandems in LoToJa Classic 2011 finsihed the first 34 miles (of a 206 mile race) in 1:07 per the 2011 results page. That's a hair shy of 30.5 mph for a nearly flat 200 ft gain segment. Two teams went on to finish all 206 miles, 7,300 feet of climbing in under 10 hours. They averaged 21.5 for the final 45 miles and about 650 feet climbing.

  8. #33
    Half Fast mwandaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Southern California
    My Bikes
    A road bike and a tandem road bike
    Posts
    568
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Awesome bike!

    Another thing I like about it is that while us guys were all serious and talking about wheels, weight, gearing, frame material and average speeds, the stoker put something pink and fuzzy under her seat. That puts our silly tech talk in perspective
    Not slow, not fast, but Half Fast!

  9. #34
    Senior Member Turbotandem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    My Bikes
    Paketa V2r di2, C-Dale MT 3000, Teesdale, 1963 Huffy Daisey
    Posts
    165
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The V2r gearing typically uses an 11-36 cassette, 38 or 39 to 52 or 53 from rings. Sufficient for just about any climb up to 15% if short. For some teams in the thread maybe enough for even long climbs. Gates has mentioned coming out with a compact 110bcd sprocket which would be lovely to offer more range of gearing for the V2r, but no confirmation on that rumor yet.
    For the post asking about climbing, for us, upgrading from the V2 to the V2r improved our climb rates and adds at least 5% to our efficiency.
    In terms of rim heat dissipation question above, we also ride in the Rockies and are about 190# buck naked. Last year we did all the top 10 highest paved passes in north america, all here in CO on our "old" Paketa V2 with caliper brakes. Little if any heat problems with the 34mm deep rims. In fact we have temperature reading "plates" to mark the high temp and never exceeded 200 degrees. There is another post somewhere in the forum from about a year ago with more details on this topic and the temp plates by palmer wahl. I believe that is part of a discussion on the forum about the merits of disk versus rim brakes, roughly concluding either is a fine option if done properly, and either can fail if not done correctly. Although I believe that posting also noted that heavier teams or touring weights certainly make the braking harder to solve.
    FYI we are now on 30mm front and 38mm rear kinlin rims for similar heat dissipation reasons.

  10. #35
    Senior Member waynesulak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Ft Worth, TX
    My Bikes
    650B tandem converted from Santana Arriva, Santana Noventa, Boulder Bicycle 700C, Gunnar Sport, Trek TX700,
    Posts
    1,734
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Turbotandem View Post
    The V2r gearing typically uses an 11-36 cassette, 38 or 39 to 52 or 53 from rings. Sufficient for just about any climb up to 15% if short. For some teams in the thread maybe enough for even long climbs. Gates has mentioned coming out with a compact 110bcd sprocket which would be lovely to offer more range of gearing for the V2r, but no confirmation on that rumor yet.
    For the post asking about climbing, for us, upgrading from the V2 to the V2r improved our climb rates and adds at least 5% to our efficiency.
    In terms of rim heat dissipation question above, we also ride in the Rockies and are about 190# buck naked. Last year we did all the top 10 highest paved passes in north america, all here in CO on our "old" Paketa V2 with caliper brakes. Little if any heat problems with the 34mm deep rims. In fact we have temperature reading "plates" to mark the high temp and never exceeded 200 degrees. There is another post somewhere in the forum from about a year ago with more details on this topic and the temp plates by palmer wahl. I believe that is part of a discussion on the forum about the merits of disk versus rim brakes, roughly concluding either is a fine option if done properly, and either can fail if not done correctly. Although I believe that posting also noted that heavier teams or touring weights certainly make the braking harder to solve.
    FYI we are now on 30mm front and 38mm rear kinlin rims for similar heat dissipation reasons.
    I am curious how you arrived at the 5% number. Do you have power meters or do you ride known climbs 5% faster?

  11. #36
    Senior Member CaptainHaddock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    PDX!
    My Bikes
    Custom Single, factory fixed, Cannondale RT2
    Posts
    252
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Turbotandem View Post
    we also ride in the Rockies and are about 190# buck naked.
    Wait, what? The two of you weigh in at 95lbs each?
    Last edited by CaptainHaddock; 09-11-12 at 10:13 AM. Reason: simple math...
    http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/7564/tandemsstravalogo.jpg
    http://app.strava.com/clubs/tandems]Strava Tandem Club

  12. #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    947
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by barkersoldbean View Post
    I am seriously looking at the V2r and really like the right side timing and double set up. I wondered how you were getting on with the gearing and hills? We are probably a tad heavier 268lbs and currently ride a Rondinella (1970's vintage) which is a lot heavier (>20kg or >44lbs) and has limited gearing with a TA 38/48 double chainset and a 12-32 cassette. We can cope with 10% gradients for extended periods at 40-50 cadence, but much beyond this for longer than bursts of 2-300m at up to 15% can't be sustained - you end up going anaerobic and eventually succumb as the effort sucks the energy from your legs. Our only solution presently is to swap the front chianrings for a 40/28 set up and cope with the hills but spin out easily on the flat. I was hoping that a combination of lower gearing, more modern front chainset design with a wider gear spacing and lighter weight might just enable us to cope with the 2-3km "tricky" 14-16% stuff we see in the Alps, without resorting to a triple and without spinning out. Thoughts/experiences? Tony
    How about a compact 50/34 crankset and using a timing chain rather than a belt on the V2R?

  13. #38
    Hopelessly addicted... photogravity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Central Maryland
    My Bikes
    1949 Hercules Kestrel, 1950 Norman Rapide, 1970 Schwinn Collegiate, 1972 Peugeot UE-8, 1976 Raleigh Sports, 1977 Raleigh Sports, 1977 Jack Taylor Tandem, 1984 Davidson Tandem, 2010 Bilenky "BQ" 650B Constructeur Tandem, 2011 Linus Mixte
    Posts
    4,774
    Mentioned
    14 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainHaddock View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Turbotandem View Post
    we also ride in the Rockies and are about 190# buck naked.
    Wait, what? The two of you weigh in at 95lbs each?
    That's exactly what I was thinking!! Whoah! Typo? Judging by the conversation, it appears he typed exactly what he meant.
    --
    Ridding the world of derailleurs, one bicycle at a time.

    46 Hercules Roadster, 49 Hercules Kestrel, 50 Norman Rapide, 51 Hercules Lion, 52 Hercules Windsor, 56 Hercules Royal Prince, 61 Fiorelli Tandem, 67 Carlton Super Race (IGH), 70 Schwinn Collegiate (IGH), 71 Hercules, 71 STF Hercules, 72 Peugeot PX-8 (IGH), 76 Raleigh Sports, 77 STF Raleigh Sports, 77 Jack Taylor Tandem, Early-80's Mike Appel SC, 84 Davidson Tandem, Late-80's Alpine, 10 Bilenky "BQ" Signature Tandem

  14. #39
    Senior Member Turbotandem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Boulder, CO
    My Bikes
    Paketa V2r di2, C-Dale MT 3000, Teesdale, 1963 Huffy Daisey
    Posts
    165
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sorry, 290# not 190#.
    We ride a particular climb in our area about once a month. And for the last year or more we have been working at whittling down our time but have been stuck at the same time. The first time up it on the V2r about a month ago we beat our time by almost 15%. Attribute some of that to adrenaline, although we were not chasing any singles. Attribute some of that to a few pounds off me and the bike since the last best time. We had the same average heart rate on the ascent with the V2R as the most recent prior attempts, so we were working as hard as always. After all that I still get easily 5% attributed to the right side drive. And riding one, that feels obvious; when I stand at the captain's position the bike does not lean under me like every other tandem I've ridden, instead I feel my pedal stroke pulling directly against the rear wheel.
    A right side chain would work to get a compact crank. But the belt is so nice I would not give that up. We are within 5% of the low gear we'd like to have, mostly for long duration climbs, so we can makeit until we solve the compact crank belt equation.
    Last edited by Turbotandem; 09-19-12 at 09:52 PM.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •