Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 51
  1. #1
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    38,691
    Mentioned
    34 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Tandem Hill Climbing

    What kind of climbing do you do on your tandem? What types of hills have you tackled? What's the steepest you've cycled up? Have you taken on long, hilly rides?

    Share some tips and tricks you've used to get up hills with your tandem.


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    -- First of all, we adjusted our gearing ...

    At first our lowest gear was 30T chainring and 34T cassette, and we were getting up some relatively steep hills (8% and 2-3 km long) without too much difficulty, but we struggled with steeper and longer hills.

    Then we changed to a 26T chainring with the 34T cassette, and felt more comfortable on more hills or somewhat steeper hills. With this combination we did a relatively hilly 300K which contained two steep hills (9-10% and 2-3 km long). We made it partway up both of those hills, before finally getting off and walking the rest of the way. Just recently we tackled a ride where in the first 136 km we climbed 5000 ft, including several longish (2-3 km) steep ones.

    And finally we changed our cassette so that our low gear was 26T chainring and 36T cassette. (Gear inch rating of 20.2 GI) That's about as low as we can go with a comfortable cadence, maintaining about 7 km/h, and still able to handle the bicycle. We have not yet tried it out on anything terribly steep. The 36-11 cassette has a very nicely spaced gear range and we're not struggling so much to find the right the gear on inclines, flats, and declines.


    -- Secondly, we try to maintain a steady pace without pushing too hard up the hills. I tend to try to push a bit, but Rowan tells me to ease up and keep it steady so that we don't blow up before the top or later in the event.


    -- Thirdly, we took on an Alpine Ascent Challenge on our single bicycles, and have been working on our climbing skills and fitness levels individually.


    But we're still working on our tandem climbing skills.

  2. #2
    Senior Member rdtompki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Hollister, CA
    My Bikes
    Volagi, daVinci Joint Venture
    Posts
    3,934
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The toughest hills we've ridden up would be 8 miles, 3000' of total climbing with short stretches (1/4 mile) 13-14% and longish (2 miles) at 10% or so. We currently have 24t chainring and an 11-32 cassette on our daVinci, but I've been thinking of changing the cassette to 11-36. The cooler it is the better we climb since the captain doesn't cool well at higher temperatures.

    The biggest challenge for us is not blowing up on really steep, shorter pitches which is where the 36t cog might come in handy. The long climb described, above, has a short pitch of at least 16% at the very top and we can't get up that riding.

    Our very modest climbing ability limits us to 100K organized rides with no more than 3500' of climbing or perhaps an occasional century with a bit more.
    Rick T
    --------
    Volagi - Triple"ized" and Tubeless
    daVinci Joint Venture

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Tandem hill climbing

    My captain and I do like the climbing! Living in the SF Bay area our training ground included Mt. Diablo, Mt. Tamalpais, Mt. Hamilton and Sierra Road. We've enjoyed Mt. Shasta several times, we've ridden the Mt. Laguna Century and the White Mountain Double and Death Valley Double Centuries.
    We started on a Cannondale RT3000, which we wore out and now we ride a Pinarello. Our lowest gear is 30-28, and we have disc brakes (I have a friction shifter on the rear disc brake to feed in drag on the long downhills after we climb). Our pedals are in sync.
    Last summer was our biggest climbing adventure, we took the tandem to France and rode Alpe d'Huez, Col du Galibier, and Mont Ventoux. Each climb consisted of about 2 hours of continuous climbing (some standing, mostly seated). For long sustained climbs we try to find that fine line between boredom and exhaustion and embrace it. We call it "Earning Our View".
    We enjoyed it so much that, we moved to Northern Europe last October. We are looking forward to the Alps this summer and perhaps the Pyrenees next summer.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I run a 30/28 low gear on my tandem. I've done some really long, in the 20+/- mile range, 2%-6% climbs. The lowest gear on the tandem isn't such a big deal there because we're not in it much. I've climbed 10 miles with an average grade of 14% and I've done some much shorter five mile climbs that have had pitches up into the low 20% range. We've been able to get up them pretty handily with the existing gearing.

    I like the spacing on the 11-28. I'd be bothered with the spacing on an 11-36. The jumps are too big for me but gearing is very individual and you should go with what works well for you. As you guys get stronger on the tandem (and individually) you may find that you don't need such low gears.

    As far as blowing up goes, that can be a big problem on long distance events (I'm sure I don't have to tell you or Rowan that ). Don't know if you use a HR monitor but that might be a useful tool to help keep you out of the red zone. If you know your body real well you can get buy without one (I have/do). If you need to, you may just have to stop and take a brake on really long or steep climbs to get your heart rate back down.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  5. #5
    Tandem Vincitur Ritterview's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Northern California
    My Bikes
    BMC Pro Machine SLC01, Specialized Globe, Burley Rock 'N Roll tandem, Calfee Dragonfly tandem.
    Posts
    3,222
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    I've climbed 10 miles with an average grade of 14%....
    It would be interesting to see an upload of that climb, such as on Garmin Connect or Strava. The steepest 10 mile climb in the US has been thought to be the 8.3% grade of the Eastern Sierra's Onion Valley Rd.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My bad, it's not 14%overall. It's 7.5% average with sections to 14%. That's a small difference isn't it! It's Townes Pass, I think you can find lots of info on it as it's part of the FC508 course. I've climbed Onion Valley Rd. on my single, not the tandem, great climb!
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  7. #7
    Tandem Vincitur Ritterview's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Northern California
    My Bikes
    BMC Pro Machine SLC01, Specialized Globe, Burley Rock 'N Roll tandem, Calfee Dragonfly tandem.
    Posts
    3,222
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Our gearing is 53-42-30, with a 12-29 cassette.

    Our biggest climb has been Old Tollhouse, 6.7 miles, 7.2% average grade. We haven't repeated this feat only because of stoker descent aversion.

    The steepest significant segment we've done is Redwood Gulch (we only had a 27 cog then), 1.2 miles, 10.8% average grade.

    On the Low Key Hill Climbs, we've done Montebello, Old La Honda, Palomares, and Kings Mountain Road.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Team Fab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Vancouver BC
    My Bikes
    Comotion Supremo, Trek T1000, Comotion Supremo Triple
    Posts
    216
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    We love this climb http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/16737731
    We do it on our 30-32 we actually like to go about 300ft higher to the salt shed.

    We have to stop five times on the descent to let the rims and brakes cool down. There is a short section of 18%(according to the sign anyway).

    Some people like the Pemberton to Lilooet and back but we have not had time yet.

  9. #9
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Everett, WA
    My Bikes
    CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
    Posts
    8,095
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    We have a 52-39-26 in front and a 12-34 in back. With that combo we have some good choices in the two larger rings. We are not a strong team at all, but we do train. We climb about 1500'/hour on a long steady climb. So far our best long climb has been 3800' in 18.5 miles, and for a full ride, about 6000' over a 62 mile loop. We have climbed short 18-19% grades, but luckily there's not much of that around here. We have some 2 mile climbs with 10% sections that we do occasionally, but that's about as tough as it gets here. We prefer the 4-6% stuff so we can keep up a decent cadence. We both wear HRMs and keep our HRs about the same, which works very well for us.

    We were going to do a 200k yesterday, but it was snowing at the start so we came home and went back to bed. We've seldom seen a bad day for riding, but yesterday was one. Went out today with some 37 rain and did about 1800' over 38 miles with friends mostly on singles. When we got into tandem country toward the end, we went off the front and TTed the last 10 miles to finish our quota of zone 4 for the week. Like I say, we're not fast, only 20-22 into a light headwind, but we got pretty cooked. That was good for us. 13.2 average, also good for us with that much climbing with singles. We didn't go on the descents, choosing to ride the brakes with the singles and then also climb with them for a good workout. Excellent beer, chowder, and conversation after.

  10. #10
    Gear Combo Guru Chris_W's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Switzerland
    My Bikes
    Spec' Tarmac (road), Spec' Secteur Disc (commuter & tourer), Salsa Mamasita (MTB), CoMo Speedster (tandem), Surly Big Dummy (cargo), Airnimal (folder), a train pass, and NO car :)
    Posts
    2,054
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    We've done a lot of the iconic climbs in the French Alps on our tandem (e.g., Alpe d'Huez, Galibier), plus many of the lesser-known ones and many in Switzerland.

    The two toughest climbs we've done are the Nufenen Pass in Switzerland, which averages 8.5% for 13 km (8 miles), and tops out at almost 2,500 metres (8,000 ft), see details here. Plus, a tiny road in the Chartreuse mountains north of Grenoble, France, which averaged 10% for 6 km, with a couple of touring panniers (we did have to stop for a rest halfway through, but managed to ride the whole thing). We have done sections of 15-18% for a few hundred metres, and have never had to resort to walking yet.

    We can maintain a steady pace of 700 vertical metres per hour for as long as necessary, or we can go full gas at 900 to 1000 metres per hour for about 10 minutes. I use the vertical ascent rate info on our Garmin instead of a power meter or heart rate monitors to know if we're riding a sustainable pace or not. My stoker climbs much faster when the air temperature is below 20 C / 70 F than when it is above, so in the summer we try not to do the big climbs in the middle of the day (when we have a choice).

    Our gearing is 53-39-26 with a 12-32 10-speed cassette (700x28 tires); the 26-32 has been just about sufficient for all climbs, and I wouldn't want to go any lower than that because it would mean larger spacing between cogs or chainrings. The bike is not all that light, a Comotion Speedster co-pilot, but we prefer versatility over lightweight.

  11. #11
    Has opinion, will express
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    12,774
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Cogsets or cassettes:

    11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-36
    18% 15% 13% 12% 11% 14% 17% 14% 13%

    11-13-15-17-19-21-23-26-30-34
    18% 15% 13% 12% 11% 13% 15% 13%

    11-12-14-16-18-20-22-25-28-32
    18% 15% 14% 13% 11% 10% 14% 12% 14%

    These are the percentage differences between the cogs (I think). It really is funny how perception often is not quite in synch with fact when referencing the steps on the 34-11 cassette compared with the 36-11. The 34-11 obviously is a lot more even between each gear compared with the 36-11, but that 17% difference didn't really seem that odd in practice.

    I have done most of my riding on the 32-11, and those funny steps of 10% and 14% certainly have caused me issues in the past trying to find the right gear between the 18, 20 and 22 teeth cogs. Maybe that's why the 36-11 seemed to be an improvement... and I probably overlooked how mmuch more even the 34-11 was.

    Anyway, it has been interesting to read how a number of other tandem riders might also find the same issues we find in climbing. We are surrounded by hills where we live, and Australian randonnee organisers generally believe in making their events challenging if not downright sadistic.

    Machka referred to an attempted 400 in the East Gippsland area which involved more than 5000 feet of climbing over the 136km we actually did complete. The weather in the early part of the ride also was really crappy with lots of rain.

    A couple of weeks later, we chatted to another rider at the turnaround point for our 200, and he asked if the ride was organised by a particular person. "Yes" was the answer. Then came a shudder and "I don't do his events". Now, this came from someone who is very experienced, pretty fit, and has been involved with Audax Australia for many years.

    I think his reaction told the story quite well. It made us feel a little bit better. And so has this thread.
    Dream. Dare. Do.

  12. #12
    Senior Member rdtompki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Hollister, CA
    My Bikes
    Volagi, daVinci Joint Venture
    Posts
    3,934
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
    Cogsets or cassettes:

    11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-36
    18% 15% 13% 12% 11% 14% 17% 14% 13%

    11-13-15-17-19-21-23-26-30-34
    18% 15% 13% 12% 11% 13% 15% 13%

    11-12-14-16-18-20-22-25-28-32
    18% 15% 14% 13% 11% 10% 14% 12% 14%

    These are the percentage differences between the cogs (I think). It really is funny how perception often is not quite in synch with fact when referencing the steps on the 34-11 cassette compared with the 36-11. The 34-11 obviously is a lot more even between each gear compared with the 36-11, but that 17% difference didn't really seem that odd in practice.
    Rowan, we're running a 12-32. I took a 12-13 from another cassette and replaced the 11-12. Of course with our effective 60t large chainring we don't need the 11t cog.

    I've been seriously considering going to the 11-36t cog set and looking at the numbers I don't see much of a downside.
    Rick T
    --------
    Volagi - Triple"ized" and Tubeless
    daVinci Joint Venture

  13. #13
    pan y agua merlinextraligh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Jacksonville
    My Bikes
    Wilier Zero 7; Merlin Extralight; Co-Motion Robusta; Schwinn Paramount; Motobecane Phantom Cross; Cervelo P2; Motebecane Ti Fly 29er
    Posts
    27,291
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hardest climbs we've done on the Tandem would be Everest challenge. http://www.everestchallenge.com/

    And Brasstown Bald ( shorter than the EC climbs, but with sections up to 21% friggin hard.

    Gearing for this was an 11-28 cassette with a 26 inner ring.

    One key to,climbing in the tandem is being ble to stand and dance with the bike. Necessary to
    Ower up super steep selections, and for change of pace on long 1-2 hour climbs.

    Beyond that it is team power to weight ratio.
    You could fall off a cliff and die.
    You could get lost and die.
    You could hit a tree and die.
    OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.

  14. #14
    Rod & Judy gracehowler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montrose, CO
    My Bikes
    Specialized S-works e-5, Davinci joint venture, Specialized Vienna Commuter
    Posts
    405
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by rdtompki View Post

    I've been seriously considering going to the 11-36t cog set and looking at the numbers I don't see much of a downside.
    Rick, it may cost more $, but Todd set us up with an extra tooth on the freewheel (jackshaft) driven cog, to effectively reduce our overall ratio on the davinci, we do lose top end, it gives us a final of 24-35, wonderful for pulling a bob up these ong hi altitude grades
    R&J

  15. #15
    Rod & Judy gracehowler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montrose, CO
    My Bikes
    Specialized S-works e-5, Davinci joint venture, Specialized Vienna Commuter
    Posts
    405
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    We find this climbing stuff really hard at our age, but around CO, we have very few grades above 7% that are paved, our challenge is those long grades at 9000 ft elevation or higher, we (I) can stand, if need be for the short pulls, but staying seated is really mandatory at altitude, one just runs out of oxygen and you beat yourself up standing too much, especially on the tandem. Rest stops are part of the ride! We did do a tandem ride two years ago, and while we were grinding away up a long 6% above tree line, some young buck (and his doe) pulled right by us with a 30-28 gearing, their cadence was slow and he was complaining, but they outdid us!
    R&J

  16. #16
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
    Cogsets or cassettes:

    11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-36
    18% 15% 13% 12% 11% 14% 17% 14% 13%

    11-13-15-17-19-21-23-26-30-34
    18% 15% 13% 12% 11% 13% 15% 13%

    11-12-14-16-18-20-22-25-28-32
    18% 15% 14% 13% 11% 10% 14% 12% 14%
    ...
    There is something funky with the last one. They all have the same percentages for the first two gears even though the last one has different gears.

    I think you should have made the calculations with 9 speed cassettes instead of 10 speed because the majority of us run 9 speeds (or less) and maybe included the 11-28 that many of us use.

    As far as the perceived perceptions versus non-perceived perceptions go, I think a lot of if has to do with what you are used to. I've run the larger cassettes on the Santana we used to ride. Most of the time it was fine but there are times when it was really annoying to be caught between gears. That just means you have to slow down or put more effort out to speed up to get in a more comfortable cadence. I run an 11-28 or 11-25 on my single so the 11-28 on the tandem is just like home.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  17. #17
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Everett, WA
    My Bikes
    CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
    Posts
    8,095
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I much prefer the 12-34 cogset because it splits out the ratios between the 39 and 52 rings in the midrange, giving us more choice upwind and on long slight inclines.

    Around here we have brevets ranging from 4500' to 9000' for a 200, 7000' to 18,000' for a 400, and up to 24,000' for a 600. This spring we are attempting to attempt our first 200. We're hoping for something in the lower range. Stoker has what one might call a negative interest in doing anything that would involve riding from dawn into and perhaps through the night. She claims it doesn't sound like fun. Huh. Have done on my single, but not going to happen on the tandem.

    I get her point. On my single I was a 7-9 hour guy on a 200 and a 15-19 hour guy on a 400, depending. Our tandem team will be working to stay ahead of the closing times, which is a whole different deal. I don't know if I would have been interested in brevets on my single if that were the case.

    We can't stand on the steep stuff - we have to sit. Reason is that we have to be in such a low gear that the bike almost stops every time the pedals hit BDC if we're standing. So we can stand fine on grades up to about 10%, but not greater. Since we climb by HR, our sustainable climbing speed standing is actually lower than our sustainable speed seated, because standing always raises one's HR. The supremely talented don't find that a great objection because they are so far off their redline anyway. "Dancing on the pedals" is not something we'll ever do for more than a few strokes.

    Our solution for the steep stuff is to learn to put out power at low rpms by pedaling smooth circles and just keeping the grinding speed constant. "Smooth, smooth" is one of our calls to each other. On long climbs, we try to stand for a few strokes every 10 minutes, by the clock. Gives us something to look forward to, rests the butt, and stretches the legs. On my single I'd hold the stand for about 45 seconds. We're trying to work up to that on the tandem.

  18. #18
    Senior Member rdtompki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Hollister, CA
    My Bikes
    Volagi, daVinci Joint Venture
    Posts
    3,934
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
    .... On long climbs, we try to stand for a few strokes every 10 minutes, by the clock. Gives us something to look forward to, rests the butt, and stretches the legs. On my single I'd hold the stand for about 45 seconds. We're trying to work up to that on the tandem.
    We're definitely "sitters" as well. We can stand for short pitches if either the captain puts us in the wrong chainring or we can see the end of the pitch. The problem we have with standing on sustain pitches of say 10% is that there is a tendency to accelerate the bike unless I up shift. Once in a taller gear it's darn tricky to down shift without breaking something.

    How do you handle that? If you're on a 10% grade spinning 80, do you up shift to stand or just let your cadence and speed slow to something more reasonable when standing?
    Rick T
    --------
    Volagi - Triple"ized" and Tubeless
    daVinci Joint Venture

  19. #19
    Senior Member ftsoft's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ohio
    My Bikes
    Bianchi xl boron, Trek WSD, Comotion Speedster, Giant TCR Advanced
    Posts
    274
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    We are pretty bad climbers. I'll use age as an excuse as we are 134. We do short steep climbs mostly as that's what we've got here in Ohio. We've done short 18% climbs and tons of not very long 10% climbs. The hardest climb we've done was probably the finish of GTR when it was in Athens (pretty short, but it surprised us). We use a 26 inner and 12x28 around here and an 11x34 when we go to hillier places.

    Someone mentioned that the steepest climb in the US was in California at 10 miles and 8.3%. I always thought that the climb up to Mt. Mitchell from Asheville was more than that at 30 miles and 8.5% average and having done that, I wouldn't have thought it would rank that high. I must be mistaken about the numbers.

    Frank

  20. #20
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    38,691
    Mentioned
    34 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Up to 8% is all right for us ... it gets tiring if it is long, but we can kind of settle in and ride it. 8% grades are quite common around here. The hill that starts at our doorstep becomes 8% a couple hundred metres down the road, and we've ridden that several times. It's when they get steeper that they start to become an issue.

  21. #21
    pan y agua merlinextraligh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Jacksonville
    My Bikes
    Wilier Zero 7; Merlin Extralight; Co-Motion Robusta; Schwinn Paramount; Motobecane Phantom Cross; Cervelo P2; Motebecane Ti Fly 29er
    Posts
    27,291
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ftsoft View Post
    We are pretty bad climbers. I'll use age as an excuse as we are 134. We do short steep climbs mostly as that's what we've got here in Ohio. We've done short 18% climbs and tons of not very long 10% climbs. The hardest climb we've done was probably the finish of GTR when it was in Athens (pretty short, but it surprised us). We use a 26 inner and 12x28 around here and an 11x34 when we go to hillier places.

    Someone mentioned that the steepest climb in the US was in California at 10 miles and 8.3%. I always thought that the climb up to Mt. Mitchell from Asheville was more than that at 30 miles and 8.5% average and having done that, I wouldn't have thought it would rank that high. I must be mistaken about the numbers.

    Frank
    We've done Mt michell from Asheville on the Tandem and singles. It's 35 miles of mostly continuous climbing from Asheville, but there's some downhill, and most of that is very gradual.

    The spur off the Parkway to Mt Mitchell is steeper with some 8-9% but its not as steep as a number of climbs in the SE including Brasstown.
    You could fall off a cliff and die.
    You could get lost and die.
    You could hit a tree and die.
    OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.

  22. #22
    Tandem Vincitur Ritterview's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Northern California
    My Bikes
    BMC Pro Machine SLC01, Specialized Globe, Burley Rock 'N Roll tandem, Calfee Dragonfly tandem.
    Posts
    3,222
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_W View Post

    Our gearing is 53-39-26 with a 12-32 10-speed cassette.
    That's a wide range triple!

    Your middle ---> outer ring jump is 14t
    Your inner ----> middle ring jump is 13t

    Which jump is the greater shifting challenge?

    I ask, as I have a 53-42-30, and to do the climbing mentioned in the OP, I'd like to use a 28 inner ring. Will the 14t jump from 28 to 42 be too much, and require a smaller middle ring?

  23. #23
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Dallas area, Texas
    Posts
    10,565
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A very interesting post. I like the "stoker descent aversion" phrase.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  24. #24
    Senior Member joe@vwvortex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Vacaville, CA
    My Bikes
    Santa Cruz Blur LT, Kestrel Evoke, Co-Motion Speedster Tandem
    Posts
    484
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    We currently run a 26-39-53 in the front and an 11-29 Campy 10 in the rear. Around here there are a couple climbs with several 20%+ pitches which aren't really long but are very hard.

    My stoker constantly wants to go faster on descents........
    Administrator and Contributing Editor - Vortex Media Group

  25. #25
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Everett, WA
    My Bikes
    CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
    Posts
    8,095
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by rdtompki View Post
    We're definitely "sitters" as well. We can stand for short pitches if either the captain puts us in the wrong chainring or we can see the end of the pitch. The problem we have with standing on sustain pitches of say 10% is that there is a tendency to accelerate the bike unless I up shift. Once in a taller gear it's darn tricky to down shift without breaking something.

    How do you handle that? If you're on a 10% grade spinning 80, do you up shift to stand or just let your cadence and speed slow to something more reasonable when standing?
    On my single, I shift from the granny to the middle ring and then up two more in back. I can't do that on the tandem. Getting from the granny to the middle is tricky and best done on a low incline that can easily be sat in the middle ring. So yes, on the tandem we shift up in back 3-4 cogs, which is a lot on a 12-34. I had to hit the middle ring on the single because I ran a 12-25 or 12-27 in back, so shifting a few cogs didn't do much until I got further over than I want to go.

    Looking at the numbers, on my single I might go from 30" to 54" or between a 1.5 and 2 multiplier. So on the tandem I'll go from 21" to 35", which is still dang low to be standing. I can shift fine in the back either way, unless I'm on something so steep that we can't stand anyway. The thing that's kind of tough is that chain tension in a tandem granny ring while standing is quite high. Better have a good chain.

    BTW, we're not spinning 80 on a 10% grade even with our extremely low gearing.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •