Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Tandem Cycling A bicycle built for two. Want to find out more about this wonderful world of tandems? Check out this forum to talk with other tandem enthusiasts. Captains and stokers welcome!

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-26-12, 11:50 PM   #1
stripes
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
stripes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: alameda, CA
Bikes: 2004 Cinelli Supercorsa, 2005 Tommasini track, 1983 Specialized Expedition, 1991 Fuso Cyclocross, 1991 Masi Team 3V, 1989 Serotta, De Rosa Neo Primato
Posts: 262
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Wheel for a frame with 126 rear spacing

Hey all,

I have recently purchased an old tandem from the mid-80s and it has 126mm rear spacing. I need a new rear wheel for it. Would it be reasonable to build a wheel at 126mm rear spacing and expect it to last, something like a Phil 48 hole hub to a Velocity Dyad, or should I have the rear triangle re-spaced? If respacing is the answer, how much could I safely expect to increase the spacing by? What have the rest of you with old tandems done (besides buy a new tandem)? This is a starter bike, and it won't be used for racing, just casual rides around Alameda (which is flat as a pancake). We are about 330 pounds, but with a different stoker could be up to 360ish.

Thanks!

Alex
stripes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-12, 06:51 PM   #2
WheelsNT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 128
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The important pieces of info would be the frame material and who made it. With that, perhaps some of the folks who have been riding a tandem longer than I would have an idea on this.
WheelsNT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-12, 08:19 AM   #3
waynesulak
Senior Member
 
waynesulak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Ft Worth, TX
Bikes: 650B tandem converted from Santana Arriva, Santana Noventa, Boulder Bicycle 700C, Gunnar Sport, Trek TX700,
Posts: 1,927
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Another factor to consider is your desired durability. I may want to take a different approach on a bike that will get 200 miles a year vs 6,000 miles a year.

You mentioned it will be flat land riding. How are road conditions? Smooth, vs Potholes ?

Also do you want to keep the same gearing or upgrade to modern gearing?

All of the above feed into your budget. Do you want to limit the cost as much as possible?

Last edited by waynesulak; 08-28-12 at 08:22 AM.
waynesulak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-12, 08:58 AM   #4
obrentharris 
Senior Member
 
obrentharris's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Bikes: fewer (n-1)
Posts: 1,207
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by stripes View Post
This is a starter bike, and it won't be used for racing, just casual rides around Alameda (which is flat as a pancake).
You should be fine with your 126 spacing for the type of riding you describe. One would have to ride an awful lot of loops of the island to rack up thousands of miles a year. No bicycle-eating potholes that I know of in Alameda and certainly no steep descents with sharp turns. Fully loaded touring would be a little pointless when you're never more than 5 miles from home. Doesn't sound like riding that demands the ultimate in wheel strength to me.
Enjoy!
Brent
obrentharris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-12, 07:05 PM   #5
stripes
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
stripes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: alameda, CA
Bikes: 2004 Cinelli Supercorsa, 2005 Tommasini track, 1983 Specialized Expedition, 1991 Fuso Cyclocross, 1991 Masi Team 3V, 1989 Serotta, De Rosa Neo Primato
Posts: 262
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for the input! To clarify, the bike is steel. Alameda has pretty nicely paved roads and is pancake-flat. We would be looking at 500 miles a year, tops. I have no plans to upgrade the shifting gear at this time. I'm not concerned about budget, I just don't want to have to replace a wheel every six months. If we get more into it, we would probably upgrade to a newer bike, but it sounds like a strong well-built wheel will do just fine for our current purposes. Again, thanks for the help!
stripes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-12, 11:54 PM   #6
cajoe
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: SF Bay Area, CA
Bikes: 1994 Santana Sovereign tandem, 1999 Trek 5000, 1985 Specialized Allez SE
Posts: 47
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
For a data point, our old Santana Arriva S has 130mm spacing and we're running 36 hole Mavic Open Pros on Shimano 105 hubs (built by previous owner). Yep, plain old road wheels. Our team weight is similar to yours. We've put about 1000 miles on those wheels and I've had to true the rear once so far. I imagine with a 9sp drivetrain the dish on our wheels is no better than yours.

So, while I wish the rear wheel was a bit sturdier I haven't felt the need to replace it so far. So I agree, if you build a sturdy 126 I think you'll be fine. The main reason to go to 130 is if you want to upgrade the drivetrain. That said, cold setting from 126 to 130 is apparently pretty straightforward.
cajoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-12, 12:24 AM   #7
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Bikes:
Posts: 6,232
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 153 Post(s)
Our tandem is from the mid-60s and has 120mm rear dropout spacing. We had issues with the original 36-spoke rear wheel in '75 when we used the bike for some camping trips. I rebuilt the wheel at that time with a Phil Wood 48-spoke hub and that is still in use with no further problems. I agree with the comments above that sticking with the current spacing should be fine unless you want to upgrade the drivetrain to a cassette hub with more cogs. If you do want to upgrade it shouldn't be any problem to have the spacing changed to 130 or 135mm, but go to a shop that has the proper alignment tools so the dropouts remain parallel.
prathmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:16 AM.