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Tandem Cycling A bicycle built for two. Want to find out more about this wonderful world of tandems? Check out this forum to talk with other tandem enthusiasts. Captains and stokers welcome!

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Old 07-25-13, 11:57 AM   #1
Carbonfiberboy 
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Another plug for touring on your present or future tandem

We just returned from our third tandem tour, a 320 mile tour from home to visit friends in other cities. Since we stayed with friends all except 2 nights, we did those nights in a B & B. Thus we were cc touring and only carried about 20 lbs. over our normal sport bike weight, carried in two rear panniers. This even included a dress and flats for my wife. It was really fun. We went pretty well, only slightly slower than our usual average, maybe .5 mph off, even though our route had a few hills and rollers, about 40'/mile. We saw country we hadn't seen at a pace that allowed us to see it. We ate places at which we would not have eaten and talked to people to whom we would not have spoken had we been using a different mode of transport. The bike worked flawlessly and we had one flat, quickly changed. We have almost 1000 miles of touring on these tires, so maybe it's time.

We have three touring trims for our bike: +20 lbs. for cc touring, +34 lbs. for camp touring, +40 lbs. for camp touring with a stove. We've been backpacking for almost 40 years, so we have the light idea. We run a carbon fork, so we only use a rear rack and panniers, supplemented with bar, frame, and captain's saddle bags.

So if you have braze-ons for a rack on your current bike, get a rack and a pair of panniers and go touring! It's a gas. If you're planning a bike, get one with rear braze-ons or have the builder add them. Yes, they can add pannier attachment points to a carbon bike build.

We're an older (132 yrs.), not particularly strong team, but our tandem rolls like magic, even with panniers.
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Old 07-25-13, 04:07 PM   #2
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Even if your bike doesn't have mounting points for the rack, then just get a Salsa seat post clamp with rack eyelets:



And a quick-release mounting kit from Tubus:


And almost any bike can be equipped with a rack sturdy enough for some light touring.

As said above, touring is an awesome way to see some beautiful scenery, get away from it all, and just turn off for a few days (or months).
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Old 07-25-13, 10:47 PM   #3
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Touring was the primary reason we bought our first tandem twenty-five years ago. In fact, when we picked up our new tandem in Seattle last year we "toured" it home along a 460 mile route. The mechanic had a chuckle when we explained why we were wearing such shoddy clothes to pick up such a nice bike; we were only wearing them for that day and they were to be discarded in the morning when we left for home. Why carry clothes we're not going to wear?

It was a very nice three day (well, there was a lot of night riding since we enjoy the light traffic at 0300) ride home with a couple of hotel stops. We were rewarded the final day by coming across a CycleOregon ride that had several hundred riders going our way, including a few tandems.
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Old 07-25-13, 11:19 PM   #4
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Even if your bike doesn't have mounting points for the rack...
Thule makes the Pack ’n Pedal™ Tour Rack for mount-deprived frames.




But if the Calfee has mounting points (here with a female-threaded fastener) shouldn't just about all tandems?

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Old 07-26-13, 04:32 AM   #5
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We just got done with our very first tour on our Speedster. For our first time out, we did a two day, one night 90 mile tour around the Niagara Pennisula in Canada with three other tandem teams. We stayed at a B&B, so packing was light. We loved it and are looking forward to some longer tours in our future!

We also have a Carbon Fiber fork so we are limited to only a rear rack, although a trailer could be an option!
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Old 07-26-13, 06:31 AM   #6
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If you have the cantilever brake bosses on your carbon fork you can use one of these racks from Old Man Mountain.

http://www.oldmanmountain.com/Pages/...rontRacks.html

I use the Ultimate Lowrider on my Santana with carbon fork. Carrying the load low up front has a much less negative impact on the handling of the bike.
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Old 07-26-13, 06:39 AM   #7
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We have 3 multi day tandem tours under our belt and I find the main challenges to be shuttling the long bike if its a one-way and sharing 2 paniers for 2 people. Both of these are easily overcome with $, i.e. CC touring.
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Old 07-26-13, 10:29 AM   #8
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We toured through your area last year on our way from so. of Seattle to Vancouver, BC. Panniers were used with good effect. Our motto is: "Get the lightest bike you can afford and carry the heaviest wallet."
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Old 07-26-13, 08:03 PM   #9
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We just returned this week from our first tour, 11 days and 300 miles in Northern Ireland.
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Old 07-26-13, 11:07 PM   #10
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We just returned this week from our first tour, 11 days and 300 miles in Northern Ireland.
Do tell. We've heard great things about western Ireland. You have routes posted?
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Old 07-28-13, 12:37 PM   #11
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We just returned from our third tandem tour, a 320 mile tour from home to visit friends in other cities. Since we stayed with friends all except 2 nights, we did those nights in a B & B. Thus we were cc touring and only carried about 20 lbs. over our normal sport bike weight, carried in two rear panniers. This even included a dress and flats for my wife. .
Would you want to share your 20 lb packing list? We did a cc tour in CA and could not get below 40 lbs even though the captain took only bike shoes and I took no earrings :-) We had 2 rear panniers, a trunk bag, a small handlebar bag for tools and a frame bag in the stoker area for rain clothes. I know the 2 lb netbook was probably not necessary, but we really liked having that with us. It even seemed to me that necessary tools, tube, tire, liquids (sunscreen chamois cream etc) puts you quite a way toward the 20 lbs.
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Old 07-28-13, 10:07 PM   #12
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Would you want to share your 20 lb packing list? We did a cc tour in CA and could not get below 40 lbs even though the captain took only bike shoes and I took no earrings :-) We had 2 rear panniers, a trunk bag, a small handlebar bag for tools and a frame bag in the stoker area for rain clothes. I know the 2 lb netbook was probably not necessary, but we really liked having that with us. It even seemed to me that necessary tools, tube, tire, liquids (sunscreen chamois cream etc) puts you quite a way toward the 20 lbs.
Sure. I said "+ X lbs" meaning that much weight in addition to the weight we normally carry for sport riding. So here's our packing list for this latest trip, which includes everything except bottles. If we subtract the stuff we always have with us, it's about 20 pounds more. This was plenty of stuff for us to have fun off the bike and exist comfortably in a B&B - dinner out situation. It would not be hard to go even lighter, but at the sacrifice of some capability.

Unlike usual attachments, on my machine clicking on an attached PDF file downloads it so it can be printed and easily read.
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Old 07-29-13, 03:28 AM   #13
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If you have the cantilever brake bosses on your carbon fork you can use one of these racks from Old Man Mountain.

http://www.oldmanmountain.com/Pages/...rontRacks.html

I use the Ultimate Lowrider on my Santana with carbon fork. Carrying the load low up front has a much less negative impact on the handling of the bike.
Thanks for the info on the racks! I will definitely check them out.
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Old 08-05-13, 02:29 PM   #14
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If you have the cantilever brake bosses on your carbon fork you can use one of these racks from Old Man Mountain.

http://www.oldmanmountain.com/Pages/...rontRacks.html

I use the Ultimate Lowrider on my Santana with carbon fork. Carrying the load low up front has a much less negative impact on the handling of the bike.
Another option for a fork with drop-out eyelets and no upper eyelets except for brake bosses is the Tubus Smarti:



We just got back from 8 days of touring on two single bikes (CX bikes for some dirt-road stuff, and also doing different routes some days). I wanted the ability to carry all four panniers for some sections, but my CX/touring bike has no fork mounting points, so I decided to give the Tubus a try.

The Smarti worked great. Mounting it was straightforward, and it was really solid, and even cleared the disc brake quite easily (a Shimano CX75). I thought that not having the weight centered on the axle would cause the handling to be affected, but not at all - I felt almost no difference between having the front panniers on and off except for the extra weight slowing me down a little on the climbs.

I've never liked the old-fashioned / basic styling of the OMM stuff, and far prefer the simpler, cleaner look of the Tubus stuff.
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Old 08-05-13, 02:57 PM   #15
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Just completed a weekend trip with the Old man mountain sherpa front rack on our Speedster with a carbon fork. I like to have the upper surface for a sleeping bag or pad. Works out great, we try to keep the kids bike as light as possible so we can go farther. We had a great trip, best thing is the kids asked when we are going on another trip.
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Old 08-06-13, 08:45 PM   #16
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Just completed a weekend trip with the Old man mountain sherpa front rack on our Speedster with a carbon fork. I like to have the upper surface for a sleeping bag or pad. Works out great, we try to keep the kids bike as light as possible so we can go farther. We had a great trip, best thing is the kids asked when we are going on another trip.
You had just a sleeping bag or pad on the top surface? Any effect on steering? We are now using a light bar bag. Any more than about a pound in it changes the bike's feel with our Wound Up fork. I suppose we ride rather aggressively even when touring.
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Old 08-07-13, 05:29 AM   #17
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We had two saddle bags filled and a sleeping pad on to. Steering feels a little slower, but not bad. We normally ride aggressively,just not on this trip with the kids.
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