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Old 07-27-16, 03:47 PM   #1
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Emergency Camping Gear for Day Trips?

What are the thoughts on emergency camping gear for day trips?

Last Sunday I got a bit of a late start for my ride, and it started getting dark at about mile 80 of 140 miles. I had good lights, but it did give me plenty of time to think. At sunset, I was really in the middle of nowhere, and hadn't seen a car pass for quite some time, although I did start seeing a few campfires a little later. And it started getting a bit chilly, especially at the higher elevations.

A major break-down could have been bad.

Anyway, I was thinking of an old down jacket. Something to keep the upper body warm at night. Maybe an inflatable pad to sit on. Rain or lack of rain is generally predictable around here in the summer so that isn't a big concern... now.

I've got pants, not shorts so the legs are moderately protected.
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Old 07-27-16, 03:50 PM   #2
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These work to keep one warm..
I have used mine Twice.

Most of them come without the girl.

https://www.moreprepared.com/emergen...oUkaAjNo8P8HAQ
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Old 07-27-16, 03:53 PM   #3
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Yeah, I thought about a space blanket. They were handy after the Marathon runs a few years ago. But, I wasn't sure about using one at night. I suppose it would be better than nothing. And I could still improvise insulation if needed.
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Old 07-27-16, 04:01 PM   #4
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Yeah, I thought about a space blanket. They were handy after the Marathon runs a few years ago. But, I wasn't sure about using one at night. I suppose it would be better than nothing. And I could still improvise insulation if needed.
They don't weigh much or

https://www.moreprepared.com/emergen...inyl-tarp.html
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Old 07-27-16, 04:10 PM   #5
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...Last Sunday I got a bit of a late start for my ride, and it started getting dark at about mile 80 of 140 miles...
Emergency gear is most likely unnecessary if you leave early enough so that you complete trip in daytime.

Aluminized mylar space blankets do work if it's not too windy and are cheap, light and compact. Basically single use as they are impossible to repack to original dimensions. There are heavier duty multiple-use emergency bags (Al+PE) such as below, some larger with grommets to double as shelter:

https://www.amazon.com/SE-EB122OR-Em.../dp/B0090AAY6Q

Then there's tube tents, ponchos, tarps (silnylon, tyvek), water purification tabs, compact folding water bladders, etc. Most available at any Walmart. Between Coleman and Coghlan, pretty much anything camping is covered.
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Old 07-27-16, 04:17 PM   #6
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These work to keep one warm..
I have used mine Twice.

Most of them come without the girl.

https://www.moreprepared.com/emergen...oUkaAjNo8P8HAQ
Yes, I keep one in my daypack when hiking. In a real emergency the insulation value could be increased by stuffing leaves/twigs/etc. inside - but would probably work even better if the girl accessory were included. Don't carry one on my bike rides since so few are simultaneously outside cellphone coverage, on deserted roads, and while riding solo.
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Old 07-27-16, 05:01 PM   #7
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I think of that kind of gear only on winter backcountry ski trips, when a gear failure could really affect your next birthday. On any road I'd bike on, I'd never think of carrying overnight gear. I'd leave the bike and thumb a ride. Or change my plans at midday, have a preset turnaround time, and not get into a bind. But I'm older and think more like that now!
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Old 07-27-16, 09:48 PM   #8
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Cell phone if you get stranded or just plain run out of steam far from home and a way to tell time so you can try to estimate your time budget.

This is the touring forum, most of the people on this forum are planning to camp some or most days of their trip instead of camping only as an emergency.
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Old 07-27-16, 10:10 PM   #9
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IMO - better planning is the best protection, but I understand that stuff happens. I guess it depends on where you ride and the point of no return distances. Here in the east, there are few, if any, where a bailout distance would be greater than 30 miles or so, though many years ago a few of rode a60 miles to a hotel, only to find it had burnt down, and we needed to dig down and pull another 40 miles that evening.

Out where you are, distances are bigger, and I can imagine loops with much greater point of no return distances. I guess I'd carry some plastic sheeting or a space blanket, a tough knife and some fire starter. I wouldn't rely on a cell phone since there are fewer, if any, towers in these unpopulated areas.
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Old 07-28-16, 12:06 PM   #10
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Just cut open a Tauntaun and climb inside. If that doesn't sound practical, buy one of these:


Star Wars Tauntaun Sleeping Bag | ThinkGeek
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Old 07-28-16, 12:11 PM   #11
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I think of that kind of gear only on winter backcountry ski trips, when a gear failure could really affect your next birthday. On any road I'd bike on, I'd never think of carrying overnight gear. I'd leave the bike and thumb a ride. Or change my plans at midday, have a preset turnaround time, and not get into a bind. But I'm older and think more like that now!
I used mine during the summer touring across the us.

110*F Sunny in the day.Dropped quickly to 56*F at night.
The drop is what made it cold.I was not using a sleeping bag.
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Old 07-28-16, 12:18 PM   #12
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Thanks for the responses so far.

I suppose another option I was thinking about is 50 gallon garbage bags. Dirt cheap, light (both light duty and heavy duty. And, very customizable.

I suppose there are also extremely light weight slickers (pants and jacket?). I always think of reusable, but if one is considering emergency preparedness, then single use would be fine.
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Old 07-28-16, 12:18 PM   #13
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Can be used in the rain, takes up little space when rolled, can be used over & over:

Pearl Izumi Elite Barrier Cycling Jacket (For Men) - Save 60%
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Old 07-28-16, 12:34 PM   #14
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Thanks for the responses so far.

I suppose another option I was thinking about is 50 gallon garbage bags. Dirt cheap, light (both light duty and heavy duty. And, very customizable.

I suppose there are also extremely light weight slickers (pants and jacket?). I always think of reusable, but if one is considering emergency preparedness, then single use would be fine.
I made a set of rain gear from silnylon, 7 oz for the set, each piece packs to the size of a fist. Very durable. If you can find a vendor with your price point or are handy sewing, it's an option. I seldom leave the jacket behind since the mountains here are known for highly variable weather and it's only 3 oz.
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Old 07-28-16, 12:55 PM   #15
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Out where you are, distances are bigger, and I can imagine loops with much greater point of no return distances. I guess I'd carry some plastic sheeting or a space blanket, a tough knife and some fire starter. I wouldn't rely on a cell phone since there are fewer, if any, towers in these unpopulated areas.
One of the problems I get with T-Mobile is that I frequently get into areas that my cell reports "Emergency calls Only". I'm not sure how 911 would respond to calls for a ride home, or if they'd send an ambulance when one really just needs a friend. But, I think many more remote areas would have absolutely no service.

As far as loop (or out and back) distances. It really depends on the loop.

My last loop was about 145 miles total, with a 20 mile and a 60 mile segment on back roads, without towns or major highway access (excluding an active RR bridge along one segment). So, a bail point in the middle would be about 75 miles back home, and 30 miles to get to a main road, or a small town. And I'm not sure where all of the motels are. Some undoubtedly would be pretty expensive "resorts". Depending on the ride, shortcuts might only save 5 or 10 miles for the whole loop.

I was wondering about fire stations, but most rural ones are "volunteer" stations with minimal if any on-site night-time staffing. Same with ranger stations (which are also sometimes simply closed).

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This is the touring forum, most of the people on this forum are planning to camp some or most days of their trip instead of camping only as an emergency.
You can have it moved if you like. I consider there to be overlap between ultralight touring, ultracycling, and road riding (individual). And, I suppose also gravel or cycloross as the 145 mile ride did include over 10 miles of gravel, and it would have been quite a bit more if I hadn't re-routed.

A 150 mile day trip can rival many short tours. And I'm considering pushing that to 200+ mile day trips... well, partly day trips. And I doubt I could count on sunlight for the whole trip.
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Old 07-28-16, 01:21 PM   #16
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One of the things I consider when riding alone in sparsely populated areas is the frequency of passing traffic. I consider motorists my emergency backstop, and factor the time interval between cars. We all prefer low traffic, but no traffic isn't necessarily a good thing.

So, think about the "what if"s and consider riding these long desolate routes with a friend or two. Keep in mind that this advice is coming from someone who is far from religious about the buddy system, and when scuba diving operates on a "same ocean, same day" version. Nuff said, it's your call and you don't owe anyone here (certainly not me) an explanation.

Meanwhile back to your original question. As I said initially, planning may be your best friend. Before starting, review the planned route with an eye to bailout options. Make a note of motels, gas stations, police or fire stations, and even clusters of homes, or other possible Plan-B options, with the "point of no return" benchmarks. This is what pilots and navigators do and those Plan-B locations are key to laying out routes. The exercise will serve you well whether it ever gets used.

It may not save your life, but knowing your options can come in very handy. Imagine you catch a pothole and buckle your rear wheel, 10 miles past a gas station. Wouldn't be nice to know if the nearest one is in front of you, or you should walk back for 3 hours?
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Old 07-29-16, 12:25 PM   #17
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Old 07-30-16, 10:18 AM   #18
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Location and conditions really make a huge difference in the amount of gear I'd take with me for a 'just in case' scenario. In general, I try to keep enough gear to survive a night out, even if it won't be comfortable. Backcountry ski trips call for a lot more food and insulation than summer trips down the coast, and if surviving the night just calls for checking into a hotel and ordering room service, so be it.

Most conditions I've toured in, surviving the night would just be a matter of pulling off to the side of the road, pulling on whatever jacket I had with me already and lying down.
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Old 07-30-16, 09:07 PM   #19
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When I am on a long ride where there is a remote chance that I might be caught out after dark, I take one of the mylar emergency space blankets in the spring and fall, and a minimal nylon tarp(5' by 7') in the summer. Just enough to keep me a little drier and if its chilly, a little warmer. I usually have bug spray as well for day use, but would saturate with it to keep ticks off me at night.
In the winter when days are shorter, I will carry both of these. They add about 12 ounces together.
I would not expect to sleep super comfortably. Just be a little less exposed.
Like has been said, a lot depends on time of year, destination, route and how much traffic to expect.
If I was injured or had a serious mechanical, I would try to hitch. But if I just miscalculated my daylight, I would have to tough it out till first light.
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Old 07-30-16, 09:30 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post

This is the touring forum, most of the people on this forum are planning to camp some or most days of their trip instead of camping only as an emergency.
You're correct but there has been a time or two when B&B/hotel touring where we got delayed and couldn't make it to our predetermined destination for the evening, and of course we didn't have our complete camping gear with us, so in that regard, I'm interested in what others could create as a small emergency or contingency pack.
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Old 08-01-16, 07:44 AM   #21
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I never carry overnight stuff on any road day ride. I figure that worst case I could pull an all-nighter walking. Most roads I have ridden on will have a car at least every few hours and the more remote the more likely they are to stop and help. On lightly traveled desert roads I have found that almost every car will stop if you look like you need help.

That said if you must carry something, one option would be a 6 or 7 ounce bivy like the ones from Titanium Goat or Borah. I use my Borah Side Zip as my primary shelter even on some long trips where I camp every night for longish periods. It is small and light enough to fit in my jersey pocket and hardly be noticed.

Another option would be wind pants (3-4 ounces and packs quite small) and windshirt (3-4 ounces and packs quite small) plus maybe a warm cap.

Still another option is a 3 ounce DriDucks Emergency Poncho. I often have carried these on long day hikes.
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Old 08-01-16, 01:41 PM   #22
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I would never bring overnight gear on a day ride.

If there was a chance I would be out at a time when temps would drop, I would bring appropriate clothing for the temp change.
If I got a late start to a massively long day ride(which 140mi is just that), I would make the changes necessary to still get home at my goal time...so it would be a shorter ride.

A battery pack is with me for all long day rides to ensure my cell phone has enough power at all times. That way, I can just call family if needed.
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Old 08-01-16, 01:53 PM   #23
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Calculating for all the what-ifs in the world is an impossible waste of time.

What touring should have taught all practitioners is fearlessness.

Enjoy the moment and what ever happens you'll be able to handle it.

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Old 08-01-16, 02:22 PM   #24
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Calculating for all the what-ifs in the world is an impossible waste of time.

What touring should have taught all long time practitioners is fearlessness.

Enjoy the moment and what ever happens you'll be able to handle it.
In finding and leading back day hikers and day trip canoe renters who have been lost, I have found a fine line between fearlessness and being clueless.

Ive walked five miles with a broken forked bicycle over my shoulder, and over 20 cars passed with not one stopping to offer help. And in an area with no cell service.

Its just condescending criticism on the subject. So here, I will rewrite what you said so it sounds less judgmental, and would be an interesting addition to the topic.
Quote:
Calculating for all the what-ifs in the world is an impossible waste of time.

What touring has taught me is fearlessness.

I enjoy the moment and what ever happens am able to handle it.
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Old 08-01-16, 03:12 PM   #25
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I
Ive walked five miles with a broken forked bicycle over my shoulder, and over 20 cars passed with not one stopping to offer help.
Out of curiosity... Did you try to hitch a ride or just carry the bike?

FWIW, I have only needed to hitch a ride a few times with my bike in my 65 years, but I have been with others who have quite a few times and I don't recall any of them waiting much more than 20 minutes if they made it obvious that they wanted help.

A lot depends on where you are and the situation. I have hitch hiked back to my car or to a trail head on backpacking trips and never had a problem. In places like the Yosemite area I have often been picked up by the first or second car to pass. Other places are tougher, but walking, all night if necessary, isn't impossible. The good news is that the more remote or the more threatening the conditions are the more likely folks are to stop.

Also if it was a dangerous situation I'd resort to arm waving and jumping up and down to get motorists to stop. If the distance was only a few miles in fairly benign conditions and there was no injury, I'd just walk.
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