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Old 03-02-17, 10:36 AM   #51
linus
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For OP, Try out pop can stove before you actually take it on a tour. It's not as efficient as butane stove. And amount of time it takes to boil water is ridiculous if you want quick coffee or tea.
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Old 03-02-17, 11:05 AM   #52
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I felt like a tractor trailer going down the hills, then shifting down rapidly to find myself in the highest gear, going nowhere uphill.
In the lowest gear (just like a car: lower gears for lower speed or hills).
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Old 03-02-17, 11:06 AM   #53
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For OP, Try out pop can stove before you actually take it on a tour. It's not as efficient as butane stove. And amount of time it takes to boil water is ridiculous if you want quick coffee or tea.
They are at their best heating two cups of water. That's perfect for most freeze-dried meals, and if you can work out some simmering method, they burn long enough on an ounce to do mac' n cheese and things like the various Knorr sides. Boil time for two cups on the ones I've used is usually under five minutes.
After a few decades using Svea and various MSR stoves, my initial impression of pop can stoves wasn't very high either. However, once you adjust to the limitations, they are hard to beat on a lot of levels. And, they are totally silent.
If you need to cook for a group or boil a quart or more of water at a time, you will need a gas or butane stove.
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Old 03-02-17, 11:09 AM   #54
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At the risk of piling on...

One more vote for start slow and give yourself plenty of time. If you were planning on doing 700 miles in 8 days, back it off to 14 days. Or cut the tour to 350-400 miles. Plan on an average of 50 miles a day, start with 40 the first day. You always need to leave some in the tank for the next day (unless tomorrow will be a rest day).
The pacing issues are also different for loaded touring than riding a light bike. People who ride a loaded bike like a road bike are going to tire themselves out quickly. People need some practice/experience riding a loaded bike to do it efficiently.
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Old 03-02-17, 11:35 AM   #55
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Not dumbells. Rice and/or beans. Both come in convenient 1, 2, 5 and 10 (perhaps even higher) bags. They settle into the bottom of the panniers better. And, better yet, they won't wear holes in expensive water proof bags at the pressure points because they don't have pressure points.
And taste much better (once you've experienced with various weights)
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Old 03-02-17, 11:44 AM   #56
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I could do this with a 1lb Ipad, but I have a 2lb macbook and the keyboard is worth the extra 1lb to me.
Don't forget the weight of the power supply. And the pressure to have access to an electrical outlet every single day or so.

You may want to try a tablet+bluetooth keyboard. I also need more than a smart phone for work related activities. A 7 inch tablet + keyboard isn't a MacBook, but is surprisingly efficient and can run for several days between recharges.
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Old 03-02-17, 04:05 PM   #57
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Regarding a pop can stove to heat water for freeze dried, life is too short to eat bad.
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Old 03-02-17, 04:53 PM   #58
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They are at their best heating two cups of water. That's perfect for most freeze-dried meals, and if you can work out some simmering method, they burn long enough on an ounce to do mac' n cheese and things like the various Knorr sides. Boil time for two cups on the ones I've used is usually under five minutes.
After a few decades using Svea and various MSR stoves, my initial impression of pop can stoves wasn't very high either. However, once you adjust to the limitations, they are hard to beat on a lot of levels. And, they are totally silent.
If you need to cook for a group or boil a quart or more of water at a time, you will need a gas or butane stove.
Tried on PCT for 15 days, never worked well when temperature drops or in the rain. My SnowPeak Ti stove works so well that I can do 15 days with single canister. Also if you have to tour more than 10days, weight of the fuel makes it heavier than carrying canister with a stove.

Just my 2 cents.
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Old 03-02-17, 04:59 PM   #59
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Regarding a pop can stove to heat water for freeze dried, life is too short to eat bad.
Wow. I like trying local restaurants, but yours look just as great. Looks better than when I eat at home.
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Old 03-02-17, 05:22 PM   #60
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Regarding a pop can stove to heat water for freeze dried, life is too short to eat bad.
You don't know what I look like so you will have to take my word for it.
A gourmet I am not. A quick glance at my waistline will show that to me any food is good.
I couldn't cook food like you've shown if I was towing a four burner stove with an oven.
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Old 03-02-17, 05:29 PM   #61
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Depends on the activity for me.

I agree that life is too short to eat bad if the definition of bad is unhealthy. I've done trips where food is a central part of the social scene and other times food is just fuel. If I'm riding for miles and alone I would just forgo the stove all together and eat cold but healthy foods.

People poo poo the idea of canned goods because of the weight but if you add up the weight of stove, fuel and cookset, a couple of cans is probably far lighter and, depending on what you choose, it can be filled with better food than the heavily chemicalized "instant" stuff.

Most rides will pass a store or two each day and one can pick up a can or two, a good hearty loaf of bread, some fruit and packages of nuts for snacking on. last trip my entire kitchen consisted of a spoon and a can opener.
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Old 03-02-17, 05:58 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Not dumbells. Rice and/or beans. Both come in convenient 1, 2, 5 and 10 (perhaps even higher) bags. They settle into the bottom of the panniers better. And, better yet, they won't wear holes in expensive water proof bags at the pressure points because they don't have pressure points...
An even better idea as I can't eat my dumbells.

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Old 03-02-17, 06:18 PM   #63
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Don't forget the weight of the power supply. And the pressure to have access to an electrical outlet every single day or so.

You may want to try a tablet+bluetooth keyboard. I also need more than a smart phone for work related activities. A 7 inch tablet + keyboard isn't a MacBook, but is surprisingly efficient and can run for several days between recharges.
Great idea on the BT keyboard, you probably just saved me another lb
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Old 03-02-17, 06:43 PM   #64
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If you have time, perhaps try a day ride with the full gear, but set the panniers on your front rack and leave the huge bag on the top of the rear rack.

Your bike wont be so rear-heavy this way. Steering will be slower due to the weight up front, but the bike will be more balanced and you might find it even easier to ride up hills.



Just know that even very experienced riders around here change their setup from tour to tour depending on weather, location, and trying out new setups. Point is- its an ever refining process for most due to personal preferences, so there really isnt much that can be considered 'doing it wrong'.
I rode today with the panniers up front like you suggested, and although the front end was heavier (obviously), it tracked straight much easier and felt more stable. Especially uphill. Thanks for the tip
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Old 03-02-17, 06:45 PM   #65
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Regarding a pop can stove to heat water for freeze dried, life is too short to eat bad.
That is some good looking food! I am carrying a msr whisperlite with the small 11oz fuel bottle. I like homemade tacos especially after a long day of riding
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Old 03-02-17, 07:00 PM   #66
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I rode today with the panniers up front like you suggested, and although the front end was heavier (obviously), it tracked straight much easier and felt more stable. Especially uphill. Thanks for the tip
That is almost the exact luggage setup I'm using on my bike. The only difference for me is I'm not using a frame bag. I'm new to all of this myself, and am preparing for my first tour. Thread has been a good one for me, thanks!
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Old 03-02-17, 07:13 PM   #67
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For OP, Try out pop can stove before you actually take it on a tour. It's not as efficient as butane stove. And amount of time it takes to boil water is ridiculous if you want quick coffee or tea.
Trangias are pretty sweet. Not as fast as butane but they're quiet, they work well under bad conditions, fuel is easy to find, and you can't blow you camp site up.

Here's a good review, https://adventuresinstoving.blogspot...rangia-27.html

And if you want lightweight and efficient, caldera cones are pretty cool, https://www.traildesigns.com/stoves/caldera-cone-system

Not saying that alcohol is better than butane. I am saying that there are pros and cons to each system.
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Old 03-02-17, 07:40 PM   #68
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... My current set-up, summer weight quilt, air mattress, pump sack, tent and footprint, water filter and cooking gear weighs in under ten pounds...
I'm ~5 lbs for the same gear, incl. a rain cape and down poncho (multi-tasked), and honestly don't feel like I'm sacrificing anything as it's also the most comfortable rig I've ever had (incl. three different 2-man tents).
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Old 03-02-17, 07:42 PM   #69
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I'm ~5 lbs for the same gear, incl. a rain cape and down poncho (multi-tasked), and honestly don't feel like I'm sacrificing anything as it's also the most comfortable rig I've ever had (incl. three different 2-man tents).
What tent and footprint are you using?
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Old 03-02-17, 07:54 PM   #70
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What tent and footprint are you using?
Six Moons Designs Lunar Solo LE. The footprint is just a slightly undersized piece of Tyvek.
I used one of my trekking poles for the lone pole and was thinking of getting a special lightweight pole just for bike use. Then I realized I would probably need at least one trekking pole to become vertical every morning.
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Old 03-02-17, 08:00 PM   #71
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I'm ~5 lbs for the same gear, incl. a rain cape and down poncho (multi-tasked), and honestly don't feel like I'm sacrificing anything as it's also the most comfortable rig I've ever had (incl. three different 2-man tents).
About a year ago I could have been more accurate about weight. I doubt the weight of what I named is under five, but it is WELL under ten.
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Old 03-02-17, 09:15 PM   #72
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What tent and footprint are you using?
Well, VERY close to @Flintshooter ... SMD Gatewood Cape, Serenity NetTent, and Tyvek footprint, except that I've come to prefer the floorless design, reserving the modular 'nest' only for sleeping.

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Old 03-02-17, 09:47 PM   #73
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That is some good looking food! I am carrying a msr whisperlite with the small 11oz fuel bottle. I like homemade tacos especially after a long day of riding
A 20 oz ( I think) fuel bottle will fit nicely in the 3rd waterbottle cage. You might as well carry the larger container, because finding small quantities of white gas is difficult. If you find it in quart containers, the smallest I've seen, you end up wasting some or still carrying the portion that does not fit in your fuel bottle. I also have a whisperlite, but I would just as soon use a canister stove (MSR Pocket Rocket).


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Old 03-02-17, 10:54 PM   #74
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I think that fully loaded means you are on it. 50-75 lbs. would be dire past infancy.
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Old 03-02-17, 11:09 PM   #75
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I rode today with the panniers up front like you suggested, and although the front end was heavier (obviously), it tracked straight much easier and felt more stable. Especially uphill. Thanks for the tip
Glad to help. Its pretty fun to know there is more than one way to skin a cat when it comes to loading up the bike.
The rear dry bag looke like its in a lot better position too as its fully on thebrack and closer to the saddle. I would imagine thebfarter itnis from the center of the bike, the more the weight is felt in terms of wobble or sway.
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