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Old 03-02-17, 11:15 PM   #76
himespau 
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Good to see you are planning ahead.
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Old 03-03-17, 06:26 AM   #77
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Originally Posted by reppans View Post
Well, VERY close to @Flintshooter ... SMD Gatewood Cape, Serenity NetTent, and Tyvek footprint, except that I've come to prefer the floorless design, reserving the modular 'nest' only for sleeping.
My introduction to ultra light backpacking occurred on a rehike of the AT section from Dicks Creek Gap in Georgia to the Nantahala River in North Carolina.
It started when none of the thru-hikers I offered extra Coleman fuel to wanted any. They were all using alcohol stoves.
The graduate course was meeting these two my second night out.
http://www.trailjournals.com/WesStacy09/
They had just covered a distance, Tray Mountain to Standing Indian LT, that took me just over two days when I first did it at 20. It looked like they were hiking with day packs. If you read their journal you will see that on a few occasions they walked forty miles in one day. Even on the ridges of Virginia where they did it, that's no mean feat. And even though they were young, strong hikers, I don't think they could have done it with a 35+ pound pack.
As soon as I got home from that hike I started researching ultralight backpacking.
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Old 03-03-17, 06:55 AM   #78
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Regarding a pop can stove to heat water for freeze dried, life is too short to eat bad.
That's some fine-looking chow, brother!
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Old 03-03-17, 07:48 AM   #79
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Originally Posted by bosco500 View Post
I rode today with the panniers up front like you suggested, and although the front end was heavier (obviously), it tracked straight much easier and felt more stable. Especially uphill. Thanks for the tip
Realized I forgot to mention that I see you are using the underside bottle cage. Just a warning- I have seen those snap(and by seen, I mean I have experienced it as well) when they are not supported with a strap and when using basic aluminum bottle cages or inexpensive plastic cages.
The basic aluminum cages dont really bend(they do a slight bit) and when stressed, they just snap at the weld. Same with basic plastic cages.
Stainless steel cages will bend before breaking.


Anyways, the cages werent designed to hold weight with the lip facing down. That causes the cage to stretch due to the bottle constantly pushing down on the lip of the cage. They were designed to rest at an angle where the lip is facing up(on either the downtube or seat tube, the lip of the bottle is facing at an angle up or at worst, its level and vertical.
When a bike is on rough ground so there is a lot of bouncing and dynamic force, the stress on an under the downtube cage is a lot greater than if only smooth pavement is ridden.

If fuel is stored there or water, strapping the bottle to the downtube will take stress off the cage to reduce the chance of it breaking, and itll help ensure the bottle doesnt bounce out(not that ive seen that once or more...)



-end ramble-
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Old 03-03-17, 08:12 AM   #80
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
If fuel is stored there or water, strapping the bottle to the downtube will take stress off the cage to reduce the chance of it breaking
+1. You can see in this photo my fuel bottle is strapped, not to the down-tube directly, but under the bracket between the mounting bolts. It held it in-check from bouncing. Velcro strap worked well.



BTW: Although old-school-fuel-stoves have some great points. I'm now for the connivence of canisters

Last edited by BigAura; 03-03-17 at 08:25 AM.
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Old 03-03-17, 09:12 AM   #81
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Wow. I like trying local restaurants, but yours look just as great. Looks better than when I eat at home.
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You don't know what I look like so you will have to take my word for it.
A gourmet I am not. A quick glance at my waistline will show that to me any food is good.
I couldn't cook food like you've shown if I was towing a four burner stove with an oven.
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That is some good looking food! I am carrying a msr whisperlite with the small 11oz fuel bottle. I like homemade tacos especially after a long day of riding
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That's some fine-looking chow, brother!
To be honest, those meals I showed were all taken on canoe trips on the Minnesota Canadian border. (That is why there were no tables in the photos.) When you are out for 10 days without any chance for resupply and no restaurants to break the monotony, you try to bring something better than pure bordom. Some of those meals were made on an old Optimus 111B or 111T stove, those are one burner stoves that have a good simmer capability but are much heavier than I want to carry on a bike trip.

I am usually more monotonous on a bike trip where I usually leave the fry pan at home, this photo was one of the meals we had two weeks ago that we had in Florida Keys on a bike trip. One can of soup, one box of rice (half as much water as the rice box called for because the soup provided some water), some garlic and a bit of hot sauce. Not exactly gourmet, but better than freeze dried.
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Old 03-03-17, 09:31 AM   #82
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
... I see you are using the underside bottle cage. Just a warning- I have seen those snap(and by seen, I mean I have experienced it as well) when they are not supported with a strap and when using basic aluminum bottle cages or inexpensive plastic cages.
The basic aluminum cages dont really bend(they do a slight bit) and when stressed, they just snap at the weld. Same with basic plastic cages.
Stainless steel cages will bend before breaking.


Anyways, the cages werent designed to hold weight with the lip facing down. That causes the cage to stretch due to the bottle constantly pushing down on the lip of the cage. They were designed to rest at an angle where the lip is facing up(on either the downtube or seat tube, the lip of the bottle is facing at an angle up or at worst, its level and vertical.
When a bike is on rough ground so there is a lot of bouncing and dynamic force, the stress on an under the downtube cage is a lot greater than if only smooth pavement is ridden.

If fuel is stored there or water, strapping the bottle to the downtube will take stress off the cage to reduce the chance of it breaking, and itll help ensure the bottle doesnt bounce out(not that ive seen that once or more...)



-end ramble-
I almost always use a velcro strap as a reinforcement when I have a large water bottle in the lower cage. First photo. In this photo I do not have any fenders mounted, but when I do the strap helps keep the bottle from hitting the fender.

But for around home use, I usually have my spare tube, patch kit, rain cover for saddle and a multi-tool in a plastic jar in that lower cage and then I do not bother with a strap, second photo.
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Old 03-03-17, 10:19 AM   #83
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That is some good looking food! I am carrying a msr whisperlite with the small 11oz fuel bottle. I like homemade tacos especially after a long day of riding
Pasta with locally made chorizo, zucchini, red onion and fresh garlic in Westhampton, MA. I love cooking elaborate dinners while touring. A few years ago I toured in the Black Hills. For a couple of reasons, I didn't bring cooking equipment. I got sick of eating junk really quickly. Fortunately, I was able to find a couple of places that offered more than burgers, fries, steaks and pizza that you typically find in that part of the world. Still, fresh vegetables were hard to come by. At a couple places with salad bars, many of them were soaked in ranch dressing. What's up with that?
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Old 03-03-17, 10:22 AM   #84
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Realized I forgot to mention that I see you are using the underside bottle cage. Just a warning- I have seen those snap(and by seen, I mean I have experienced it as well) when they are not supported with a strap and when using basic aluminum bottle cages or inexpensive plastic cages.
The basic aluminum cages dont really bend(they do a slight bit) and when stressed, they just snap at the weld. Same with basic plastic cages.
Stainless steel cages will bend before breaking.


Anyways, the cages werent designed to hold weight with the lip facing down. That causes the cage to stretch due to the bottle constantly pushing down on the lip of the cage. They were designed to rest at an angle where the lip is facing up(on either the downtube or seat tube, the lip of the bottle is facing at an angle up or at worst, its level and vertical.
When a bike is on rough ground so there is a lot of bouncing and dynamic force, the stress on an under the downtube cage is a lot greater than if only smooth pavement is ridden.

If fuel is stored there or water, strapping the bottle to the downtube will take stress off the cage to reduce the chance of it breaking, and itll help ensure the bottle doesnt bounce out(not that ive seen that once or more...)



-end ramble-
Thank you, I need to add support for it. I lost use of one of my cages (for larger bottles anyway) due to the frame bag
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Old 03-05-17, 08:57 PM   #85
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LOL. That was awesome.

Not if they were going to enter a Pro Bowling Tour event.
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Old 03-12-17, 10:31 AM   #86
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However the bike was noticeably much easier to push up the hills.
As others have said, investigate different gearing. Consider getting a 'granny gear' for your cassette. It is a lot less effort to ride a bike anywhere, rather than walking & pushing or lugging; especially uphill. Gears provide the mechanical advantage, assuming they are low enough that you can pedal uphill.
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Old 03-14-17, 04:36 PM   #87
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I'd echo what most others are saying here - 85 miles on a fully loaded heavy touring bike is a solid effort. Depends on route profile of course, but touring vs road is not a fair comparison.

Go by hours in the saddle to true effort, assuming you are keeping things under control and not riding super hard, an hour is an hour, more or less.

Riding over your head on day 1 is not going to give your body a chance to recover overnight. If you bonk or go deep into the red zone / high heart rate, it can take multiple days to fully recover from. Takes a few rides/tours to get a feel for what you can do, but on average, I figure 10-12 mph on a touring bike. 85 miles is a solid 7-8 hour effort, that would equate easily to 120+ miles on a road bike, which is a big day for anybody.

Most folks are doing 40-60 miles a day....I've done much more than that but get little enjoyment out of it besides being a good accomplishment, 45-50 seems to be the most enjoyable and relaxing, big days FOR ME don't = fun touring, but everybody has different schedules / motivations / places to be.
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