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Old 08-30-17, 08:37 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by Piratebike View Post
As soon as the 2018 Trek 920's hit the market I am getting one for Bike Packing.
Nice spec changes. 2x11 and brifters. from bar ends and 2x10.
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Old 08-30-17, 09:17 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by lmike6453 View Post
I am just getting into bikepacking as an avid hiker and backpacker and feel that I will like this more. I just bought a $700 Diamondback Trace Sport on sale for $400 2 weeks ago and am thinking that I might regret keeping it:
(please google the link because I cannot paste urls yet)

- 700c 28" tires, 45mm
- 3x8 gearing which is really clunky and annoying
- Cheapo Front suspension fork with lockout
- 32 lbs


I have 2 weeks to return it and the decision making is driving me crazy! It works for paved surfaces ok but one limitation so far is the gear shift cables are exposed on the downtube, preventing mounting a downtube bag to hold water. No real budget, just trying to be smart with money...

Goals:

- To be able to ride on paved surface trails at a good speed / low rolling resistance (80% of riding)
- Handle gravel and dirt roads, and single track rough terrain like roots / logs / rocks / mud (20% of riding)
- Open to the idea of no front suspension fork
- Something to take on 3 day bikepacking adventures
- 30-50 mile day trips
- 29 inch wheels? you tell me, idk if it's worth it
- No pannier setup in favor of bikepacking bags

So should I keep it for paved trails and roads, and buy a second dedicated bike for rougher terrain? Or get one really nice bike that can dabble in both?
I am using a bike that similarly spec'd for similar purposes (95% on-road, 5% light gravel, though, as a result much narrower tires). Having done bikepacking with people that use bikes in the 1000-1500$ range and not struggling with it. I'd say: if you are comfortable on your bike (fit, posture, size), you should be fine. Comfort is what I would be looking for the most for the use you are describing. A lot of other things can be improvised, if necessary (bags...). 3 days at 80km max isn't a 3 month, 9000km cross-continent tour for which you would think a bit differently, I guess.
Can you get a nicer, smoother, lighter, more durable bike? Sure. Will this one do the job? Yes, maybe except for single-tracks, as mentioned by others before.
It's a bit your call on how fancy you want your ride. I've tried to display the utilitarian thinking here.
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Old 08-30-17, 10:35 AM   #28
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I just bought last year's version of that bike (Coop ADV 3.1), and it is indeed a fine road/gravel option. On sale for $933 right now, too. Seriously considering giving the bikepacking thing a go with it, instead of just tossing racks and panniers on it.

I guess I should ask you to clarify, what exactly do you mean by single track? I took it to mean more MTB style trails, was that your intent? You certainly don't want to be jumping that bike, but I guess I am unsure what your definition of single track is.
Yes exactly, no jumping it lol. Single track to me during bikepacking is like a cross country dirt road that forces you to go through a narrow off road trail with large rocks (not boulders) and tree roots and small logs here and there.
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Old 08-30-17, 10:45 AM   #29
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Nice spec changes. 2x11 and brifters. from bar ends and 2x10.
2x is more desirable than a 3x for me with no suspension so I can fit a down tube bag.

Not sure of the other pros and cons yet but I imagine smoother shifting, or less shifting.
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Old 08-30-17, 11:20 AM   #30
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Bad news: I contacted Diamondback support and they said I cannot return it because it's not in new condition.

Now the decision is is it worth it to sell it on Craigslist for less than I spent in order to upgrade...
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Old 08-30-17, 11:24 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by lmike6453 View Post
Yes exactly, no jumping it lol. Single track to me during bikepacking is like a cross country dirt road that forces you to go through a narrow off road trail with large rocks (not boulders) and tree roots and small logs here and there.
Ah, should be able to handle that no problem

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Bad news: I contacted Diamondback support and they said I cannot return it because it's not in new condition.

Now the decision is is it worth it to sell it on Craigslist for less than I spent in order to upgrade...
Costs you nothing to put it up on CL and see if anyone bites. Or to just give it a go and see how it works for you. Any accessories you buy (other than maybe a frame bag) are going to be easily transferable to a new bike.

Last edited by jefnvk; 08-30-17 at 11:39 AM.
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Old 08-30-17, 01:11 PM   #32
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Keep it. Everyone needs a beater bike.
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Old 08-30-17, 01:19 PM   #33
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keep it. Everyone needs a beater bike.
^^^this^^^
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Old 08-30-17, 03:21 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by lmike6453 View Post
I am just getting into bikepacking as an avid hiker and backpacker and feel that I will like this more. I just bought a $700 Diamondback Trace Sport on sale for $400 2 weeks ago and am thinking that I might regret keeping it:
(please google the link because I cannot paste urls yet)

- 700c 28" tires, 45mm
- 3x8 gearing which is really clunky and annoying
- Cheapo Front suspension fork with lockout
- 32 lbs


I have 2 weeks to return it and the decision making is driving me crazy! It works for paved surfaces ok but one limitation so far is the gear shift cables are exposed on the downtube, preventing mounting a downtube bag to hold water. No real budget, just trying to be smart with money...

Goals:

- To be able to ride on paved surface trails at a good speed / low rolling resistance (80% of riding)
- Handle gravel and dirt roads, and single track rough terrain like roots / logs / rocks / mud (20% of riding)
- Open to the idea of no front suspension fork
- Something to take on 3 day bikepacking adventures
- 30-50 mile day trips
- 29 inch wheels? you tell me, idk if it's worth it
- No pannier setup in favor of bikepacking bags

So should I keep it for paved trails and roads, and buy a second dedicated bike for rougher terrain? Or get one really nice bike that can dabble in both?

TIA!
Mike
The bike looks perfect for what you describe. Don't the straps for a frame bag go under the gear wires? There is nothing "clunky" about 8spds. Check out Revelate designs.
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Old 08-30-17, 03:42 PM   #35
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Nice spec changes. 2x11 and brifters. from bar ends and 2x10.
Do you prefer your 920 with brifters?
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Old 08-30-17, 05:10 PM   #36
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Ah, should be able to handle that no problem



Costs you nothing to put it up on CL and see if anyone bites. Or to just give it a go and see how it works for you. Any accessories you buy (other than maybe a frame bag) are going to be easily transferable to a new bike.
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Keep it. Everyone needs a beater bike.
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Originally Posted by NoControl View Post
^^^this^^^
Thanks guys, good to see that it might not be a bad idea to just keep it as a beater. With that in mind, when would one use a beater over a better bike? Rain etc?

I would think to use the bike that you spent all the money on to get use out of your investment.
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Old 08-30-17, 05:14 PM   #37
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Link help:

There is a big difference in a $400 and $4000 bike. Try to narrow your range a bit more, what would you realistically spend? FWIW, that isn't really a $700 bike marked down to $400, something similar from Trek or Specialized would cost you in the $500-550 range.

As far as your goals,
- To be able to ride on paved surface trails at a good speed / low rolling resistance (80% of riding): This bike is fine for that
- Handle gravel and dirt roads, and single track rough terrain like roots / logs / rocks / mud (20% of riding) If you really want to handle single track and obstacles, you need to look at a MTB with a real front suspension, not a hybrid with suspension that is never meant to leave the ground
- Open to the idea of no front suspension fork If you are doing single track and obstacles, you want suspension. You need to evaluate what the real uses of this bike are going to be
- Something to take on 3 day bikepacking adventures Pretty much anything you are comfortable on will handle this
- 30-50 mile day trips Pretty much anything you are comfortable on will handle this
- 29 inch wheels? you tell me, idk if it's worth it For tire availability, I'd stick with 29/700 (same diameter, someone decided fatter tires need to be called 29 instead of 700). 27.5 is fine on availability if you are strictly staying on the dirt, it gets lacking in a hurry for on-road use. 26 is also fine, but not much new that is decent comes equipped anymore.
- No pannier setup in favor of bikepacking bags You can add bikepacking bags to most bikes. Even on yours, you can likely get straps under the exposed cables, unless they run real tight to frame.



If you are truly looking to do single track, it is worth considering a separate bike for that. For just rough road bike packing, any decent no suspension bike that can fit wider tires will suit you just fine. It probably isn't the most suited if I were buying a bike specifically for bikepacking, but no reason it can't be made to work if you want to keep it.
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Originally Posted by DropBarFan View Post
45mm-wide tires with suspension fork seems like it would ride smooth over most stuff. While Trace Sport has lower-end components I'm not sure why the 3x8 gears would be clunky & annoying, even cheaper derailleurs usually shift fine. $4K bikes not necessarily that much better, there's always some compromises.
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The bike looks perfect for what you describe. Don't the straps for a frame bag go under the gear wires? There is nothing "clunky" about 8spds. Check out Revelate designs.
The bag might go under the wires and I might have misunderstood that you shouldn't do that because the wires will rip the bag over time, and the bag will be tight against the frame which could crimp the wires from moving?

About the 3x8 clunkiness...that could just be me noticing it when it's normal. I'll try to lookup how to align my shifters to be centered, if that's a thing.

I bought a Revelate Ripio size L and am picking it up tomorrow at REI, should be awesome!
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Old 08-30-17, 05:21 PM   #38
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Thanks guys, good to see that it might not be a bad idea to just keep it as a beater. With that in mind, when would one use a beater over a better bike? Rain etc?

I would think to use the bike that you spent all the money on to get use out of your investment.
Put some fenders and racks on it. Put some cargo racks on it, maybe some lights. Turn it into a testbed for all the good stuff you want to do with your touring bike. Turn it into a grocery-getter.
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Old 08-30-17, 06:12 PM   #39
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The bag might go under the wires and I might have misunderstood that you shouldn't do that because the wires will rip the bag over time, and the bag will be tight against the frame which could crimp the wires from moving?
I don't know what that bike has for clearance, but some bikes run the cables far enough from the tube that it is easy to slide a strap under it and not have anything rub.

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Originally Posted by lmike6453 View Post
Thanks guys, good to see that it might not be a bad idea to just keep it as a beater. With that in mind, when would one use a beater over a better bike? Rain etc?

I would think to use the bike that you spent all the money on to get use out of your investment.
Yes, yes it will. At least in my household, beaters are a good idea, in reality they sit.

That said, if you have a $4000 budget, a $400 bike, and you are looking at something else in the $1000 range, you are still well ahead. Worst case, you have the time to try and get as much as possible out of it on CL.
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Old 08-30-17, 06:15 PM   #40
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My previous Randonee brifter 3X9 was a little tricky to get front derailleur set just right so I had LBS fine-tune the position. "Beater" bike might be nice for shopping or spots where locking up an expensive bike might be risky.
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Old 08-30-17, 08:12 PM   #41
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Yep. I commute on a Hi-Ten step thru. A good ride that is actually pretty fast but crappy enough not to be a large target for thieves. And I don't mind using it in the winter when it's sand and salt time. I wouldn't lock my good bike up outside in my town for any length of time. Theft here is endemic.

Plus beaters can be fun to ride sometimes. I get a kick out of using my 1x6 or SS once in a while just because.
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Old 09-01-17, 09:50 AM   #42
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Do you prefer your 920 with brifters?
I do. I like bar ends on my 520 but off road I prefer brifters.
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Old 09-01-17, 10:19 AM   #43
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As soon as the 2018 Trek 920's hit the market I am getting one for Bike Packing.
better hope they upgrade first. if you read the online reviews,
many complaints about those 28-spoke house-brand wheels
breaking even with only moderate loads.

kinda marketeer-weird they combine those weak-arse wheels
(and too high gearing) with the terminator look and those monster
racks to give the impression it's a real zombie apocolypse
endtimes loaded touring bike.

should be fine for bikepacking if you go light, but first you'll
need to dump those racks.......

Last edited by saddlesores; 09-01-17 at 08:38 PM.
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Old 09-05-17, 11:33 AM   #44
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Well guys I bought the REI ADV 3.1 on sale over the weekend and thank you all for the recommendations.

It's an amazing upgrade over the diamondback and the bar end shifters do not bother me, but I have yet to take it out for a lengthy ride to see if the hamper performance and my annoyance level.

I really don't care about performance, but I do know that I drop to lower gears when going up a steep hill and hope that it's not annoying.
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Old 09-05-17, 11:56 AM   #45
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I really don't care about performance, but I do know that I drop to lower gears when going up a steep hill and hope that it's not annoying.
I have a similar 3x10 drivetrain. When I can I like to plan it so that I drop into the small chainring, and not pull it up into a bigger cog, when hitting the hard part of a hill.
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Old 09-05-17, 12:33 PM   #46
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Do you prefer your 920 with brifters?
Banned as a sock, most likely of YKW. He's got the mods playing Whack-a-Mole.
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Old 09-05-17, 02:23 PM   #47
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As soon as the 2018 Trek 920's hit the market I am getting one for Bike Packing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by saddlesores View Post
better hope they upgrade first. if you read the online reviews,
many complaints about those 28-spoke house-brand wheels
breaking even with only moderate loads.

kinda marketeer-weird they combine those weak-arse wheels
(and too high gearing) with the terminator look and those monster
racks to give the impression it's a real zombie apocolypse
endtimes loaded touring bike.

should be fine for bikepacking if you go light, but first you'll
need to dump those racks.......
Even with Al frame and 28h wheels, Trek 920 weighs 30lbs, same as a LHT/DT. 920 has an unusual downtube-to-BB joint to facilitate hiding gear cables/housing, but Trek routes the brake cable outside the DT! I'd prefer a conventional, stronger-joined frame without the half-assed hidden cable routing.

Why buy a 30lb bike with rack-and-bag capability and then outfit it for bikepacking? Start with a much lighter bike for bikepacking or just use the bike as intended with panniers. With 920 you're paying a premium for racks that would go unused for bikepacking. Trek 520 or Surly DT would be smarter purchase, and you could always add Tubus racks for less than $200. 920's newfangled through-axle wheels are less serviceable or replaceable than ubiquitous QR wheels - damage axle or wheel and you are down until the Special Ordered Parts are delivered.
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Old 09-06-17, 09:21 PM   #48
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Well guys I bought the REI ADV 3.1 on sale over the weekend and thank you all for the recommendations.

It's an amazing upgrade over the diamondback and the bar end shifters do not bother me, but I have yet to take it out for a lengthy ride to see if the hamper performance and my annoyance level.

I really don't care about performance, but I do know that I drop to lower gears when going up a steep hill and hope that it's not annoying.
Congrats, I think it's a good deal with TRP discs etc. Sloping top tube gives room for a Thudbuster if desired. My current bike is my first with bar-end shifters; I don't have problems downshifting. Only adjustment I had to make was to upshift to big ring a bit earlier after cresting a hill so I don't get stuck doing double-shift on a fast bumpy descent. Also I think bar-end shifting might actually reduce fatigue a bit by forcing one to change position.
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Old 09-06-17, 11:47 PM   #49
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As soon as the 2018 Trek 920's hit the market I am getting one for Bike Packing.
Trek 920s are gross.
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Old 09-07-17, 05:21 AM   #50
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Trek 920s are gross.
The frame is just okay. Too bad you can't buy just the frame without all the Bonty crap hung all over it. The 28H wheels MIGHT be okay if you tensioned them properly, which I highly-doubt they do right considering mass-production and all. All in all, if the 920 had an MSRP close to $1500 it would be much easier to overlook its initial flaws.

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