Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-26-01, 09:35 AM   #1
RainmanP
Mr. Cellophane
Thread Starter
 
RainmanP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: New Orleans, LA
Bikes:
Posts: 3,037
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
This spring I hope to do some very light "touring", 1-2 night weekend trips. Eventually, I might do some longer trips, but, realistically, I can't see ever having the time to do more than a few days. For 1-2 night jaunts I don't anticipate doing any real cooking, probably just heating water for coffee, tea, soup, instant oatmeal, etc. Can I get by with a little folding Sterno setup for this? If I need something a little better does anyone have any specific suggestions? Peak 1, Primus and MSR seem to have a selection of multi-fuels in the $45-70 range. Comments on specific models? Comments on multi-fuels vs propane, propane/butane? Let me say that I am not comfortable with any setup that uses a unique fuel arrangement that is not pretty widely available.
Thanks,
Raymond
RainmanP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-01, 11:03 AM   #2
steve33
Senior Mem. & Trail Sage
 
steve33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Asheville NC
Bikes:
Posts: 130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
All canister stoves require some pretty heavy fuel cans, and there is allways that odd amount left that if you use requires you to carry it plus your full can, + haveing to dispose of it os suffer to carry. As you can tell i dont like cannister stoves, The old standby seva 123 is realiable tough uses white gas (colman fuel] and boils water quickly, ive had one 20 years still ticking. some of the multi fuel stoves. Msr, Primus, are good but maybe over kill for your needs as they are a little more pricey than the 123, if it was my decision i would go with the 123. Dont think i am prediuce i own msr and several other stoves, but the 123 would still be my choice in this application,---- and is.!!
steve33 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-01, 02:06 PM   #3
RainmanP
Mr. Cellophane
Thread Starter
 
RainmanP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: New Orleans, LA
Bikes:
Posts: 3,037
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks again!

Steve,
I found the Svea, now Optimus Svea 123 Climber at REI. Looks like my kind of product. I love traditional things and can't resist brass.
Hey, good idea about online replies. Never thought about getting those post numbers up. :-)
Regards,
Raymond
RainmanP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-01, 05:38 PM   #4
steve33
Senior Mem. & Trail Sage
 
steve33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Asheville NC
Bikes:
Posts: 130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
They useualy go by 123-r now and have a little diffrent jet cleaning system, something like a shaker jet instead of the old needel system mine has. But they are the same old reliable stove though. Maybe a little better as origonal 123 parts are no longer available, but ive been told that their is some place that can rebuild them for 200.00 yeah, sure the origonal 123 has sentimental value, but not that much. If it ever wears out ill just frame it.!!
steve33 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-01, 10:38 AM   #5
jk639
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Bikes:
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
stove

Are you kidding? The simplicity of the cannister stoves makes them the best choice on this kind of trip. I use the Gaz and with a small cannister this setup is probably lighter than an empty Svea, just as compact, easier to use, less mess, etc. For a short trip there is no consideration for finding stores that carry the cannisters (though I found fuel cannisters all the way across the US). Check prices at Campor and REI. For a bit more money I would now get the MSR Superfly which can fit on almost all the different brands of self sealing fuel cannisters rather than being locked into one brand.
jk639 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-01, 10:48 AM   #6
steve33
Senior Mem. & Trail Sage
 
steve33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Asheville NC
Bikes:
Posts: 130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have been camping/bike touring/backpacking, for 40 years now, I know from hense i speak despite all the modern advertising hype. Iv`e used them all, and own most of them, this is the reason i chose the seva 123.!!
steve33 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-01, 11:17 PM   #7
Bubba
Senior Member
 
Bubba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Uxbridge, ON, Canada
Bikes:
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Two cents from a new member:

I've been touring for about 10 years and I love my Coleman Peak 1. It burns Coleman fuel (naptha, white gas) which you can easily get anywhere in Canada or the U.S. and in the unlikely event that you need parts, they are mostly interchangeable with Coleman lanterns so they are widely available too.

I should note that it is a worthwhile investment to buy the little tube of oil for the pressure pump. And if your stove is more than a season or two old, a replacement leather thingy for the pump is good to carry with you too.

A couple of my friends swear by the MSR whisper lite stoves citing faster heat up times, lighter weight, etc. but it seems they usually spend about 15 minutes before each meal disassembling and reassembling their stove to get it to work.

Hope this helps.

Bubba
Bubba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-01, 08:16 AM   #8
jk639
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Bikes:
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
stoves

The Svea is a fine stove, but I still prefer the cannister type stove, especially for the kind of trip described in the original question. I suspect this is like the "panniers vs trailer" discussion, a matter of personal preferences and experiences. Good luck. Check out REI's site for information on all stoves mentioned and a comparison chart of weight, boiling time, size, fuel capacity, price, etc.
jk639 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-01, 10:55 AM   #9
Bubba
Senior Member
 
Bubba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Uxbridge, ON, Canada
Bikes:
Posts: 70
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
One thing I forgot to mention about the Peak 1. The fuel tank contains enough fuel to last a long weekend, so you don't need to carry a supplementary tank on short trips.

Bubba
Bubba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-01, 10:08 PM   #10
mike
Senior Member
 
mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Snowy midwest
Bikes:
Posts: 5,392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've done a lot of camping for about 30 years and have used almost every stove there is.

My recommendation is the Coleman Peak stoves. There are several varieties. The more you spend, the more flexible your choice of fuel. The Coleman Peak gives you the best burn control and is actually pretty weight efficient when you add it all up. It is fairly compact. It works well in the wind. It is reliable. You can get parts for it at most hardware stores. And, finally, it is pretty affordable as well.

Forget the canister stoves. They are wasteful. I hate seeing the canisters littered about. If you are not the littering type, then you have to think about carrying the empty with you. You have to carry a spare when the one in use gets low which means you are almost always carrying two canisters - the one attached to the stove and the spare. They are not efficient and can even be non-useable at low temperatures and high atmospheric pressure.

The SVEA stoves are reliable, but they also are a little dangerous. I had one overheat and turn into a flame thrower when the pressure release on the fuel cap let go. The SVEA is just a little to testy for the modern man. I used one for years and it served me well, but there are better alternatives these days.

You can consider the solid fuel stoves like a canister of Sterno or the solid fuel tabs. They have a lot of advantages, but the main drawback is that it takes a lot of time to heat water with them. When you set up camp, you want something that is going to throw the btu and heat up your food and water quickly.

Forget MSR. There is too much flimsy junk to rig together if the weather is bad. The flame control is not as good as a Coleman Peak. There is no weight advantage with the MSR either, once you add it all up including the fuel canister. Frankly, based on my experience with the MSR stoves, I am surprised they have endured this long on the market.
mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-01, 07:51 AM   #11
fubar5
0^0
 
fubar5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Rolla, MO
Bikes: Redline Monocog,Surly Crosscheck, Lemond Reno
Posts: 4,056
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've got a WWII military surplus swedish oven. It rocks, I got it for Christmas. It's about 8x7in and comes with a fuel flask. The fuel can be anything, I've used gas, lighter fluid,beer, anything flammable. I love it, at home sometimes I get it out and make myself some coffe on it instead of using the stove in the kitchen.
fubar5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:28 AM.