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  1. #1
    vegan straightedge
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    Reccomend raingear for bike touring

    i'm looking for a rainjacket for a bike tour i'm about to go on. I don't plan on using it much outside of touring, so I don't plan on spending too much. I'd like something that can get compact and is waterproof. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Senior Member jnoble123's Avatar
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    For an extremely cost effective solution for light rain in mild, not too windy, conditions you might consider a rain poncho similar to what you might have worn as a kid. They have great air flow so condensation is avoided, very inexpensive, and work well in light rain with no significant side winds.

    For heavier rain conditions a jacket is better but get one with underarm zips at the very least and a back zip if at all possible to help get rid of heat buildup while wearing the jacket.

    Don't forget a helmet cover! Very useful.

    I'm actually in the process of writing an article about this particular topic so there should be something on BT101 within a couple of days.

    ~Jamie N
    www.bicycletouring101.com

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnoble123
    For an extremely cost effective solution for light rain in mild, not too windy, conditions you might consider a rain poncho similar to what you might have worn as a kid. They have great air flow so condensation is avoided, very inexpensive, and work well in light rain with no significant side winds.

    ~Jamie N
    www.bicycletouring101.com
    Ditto to the rain poncho! I purchased one from Adventure Cycling and couldn't be happier. Not too fancy, but does the job.

  4. #4
    RPM: 85. MPH: varies. edtrek's Avatar
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    Love my Carradice ProRoute rain cape!
    I've got pictures of a few different options at:
    http://www.thirdwave-websites.com/bike/rain-capes.cfm

  5. #5
    Punk Rock Lives Roughstuff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by donotpanic
    i'm looking for a rainjacket for a bike tour i'm about to go on. I don't plan on using it much outside of touring, so I don't plan on spending too much. I'd like something that can get compact and is waterproof. Any suggestions?
    I used a x-large Columbia rain jacket, waterproof yellow that looked alot like the old rain jackets ya used to wear to kindergarten; and was delighted with it on my world tour. Mine cost about $45 if i recall.

    Still..don't look for names..look for features.

    (1) Make sure the arms are long enough; buy the largest size you can be comfortable with. The extra bagginess will help with breathability yet won't be too billowy in breezy weather. A larger size will make sure the jacket doesn't creep up your back, either.

    (2) Make sure there is NOT elastic band around your wrists. Velcro is better. You want air to be able to flow up the arms (As you ride, especially downhill) to help with breathability. You can always make the velcro tight if the rain is torrential or conditions are very cold.

    (3) Have both a ZIP and a SNAP front. In cold weather you can zip up tight. In intermediate rainy cold weather you can snap more or less as you need to. Again, the snaps will keep rain out but allow breathing to be controlled by the rider as you need it. A two-way zipper is great too...you can zip it tight up against your neck, and loose down by your waist; or reverse. But snaps accomplish much the same for less money.

    (4) An attached hood is essential. In cold rain I put it under my helmet and rain does't drip down my back (although as you can imagine, unfortunately, sweat probably does). You can roll the hood into the neck and velcro or snap it in place when ya don't need it. In cold weather I'll often wear a dickie to absorb sweat so that it doesn't run down my back, if I am climbing and sweating while all bundled up.

    (5) If the rain stops and the air has a semblance or dryness, stop and reverse the jacket and you'll get rid of that layer of sweat on the inside which inhibits breathability as well.

    (6) Don't put your rain gear on too soon. My rule (unless its an obvious downpour)...if cars coming toward you have their windshield wipers on, its probably raining hard enough to put your gear on. If not, hold back a bit. There are worse fates than riding in the rain.

    I had my columbia jacket, which was waterproof; and a different windbreaker that was largely water resistant for drippy/foggy weather.

    whatever ya do don't spring for gore-tex. It is hopelessly overpriced and overrated.

    roughstuff.
    Electric car sales are on fire! :)

  6. #6
    Punk Rock Lives Roughstuff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mississippimom
    Ditto to the rain poncho! I purchased one from Adventure Cycling and couldn't be happier. Not too fancy, but does the job.
    yup...true. Dollar for dollar ponchos can really kick butt. Iwas able to control billowing just using a bungie cord around my waist; and now many have other features which make them easier to control. They double as a ground cloth, too?

    roughstuff
    Electric car sales are on fire! :)

  7. #7
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    For riding in the rain ... something I seem to do a lot of ...

    Jacket - look for something waterproof-breathable, with long underarm zippers, a back vent, and in a bright color

    Helmet cover - with a flap at the back to prevent water from running down your neck, and a bill in front to prevent water from running into your face

    Neoprene gloves, or waterproof mitts (shells)

    Neoprene booties or nylon booties (the neoprene will keep you drier, but the nylon are easier to carry)

    Rain pants ... I'm still looking for those myself

    And plastic bags by the hundreds to wrap everything you carry with you.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Bubba's Avatar
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    I have nothing further to offer as far as rain gear goes, but in the summer I just get wet. (In the cooler seasons I use a jacket from MEC which works well.) A pair of mudguards for your wheels will keep you clean (i.e. keep the road gunk off your back).
    Bubba

  9. #9
    spinergy rocks pooksypickles's Avatar
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    Ebay has some for cheap, can fold them up and put in pocket.. If not there try nashbar.com Good luck

  10. #10
    Displaced Yooper GrodyGeek's Avatar
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    The Campmor poncho is very effective and a nice hideaous yellow so you can be seen. At $30 it is a good value as it is capable of lasting a lifetime depending upon how much you need to use it. Until it gets really cold, I prefer a poncho over a rain coat, because you can evaporate some sweat underneath at least.

    http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/st...berId=12500226
    Last edited by GrodyGeek; 07-05-05 at 03:06 PM. Reason: forgot link
    Gordy
    just a modern guy, of course I've had it in the ear before

  11. #11
    Senior Member stokell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Machka
    For riding in the rain ... something I seem to do a lot of ...

    Jacket - look for something waterproof-breathable, with long underarm zippers, a back vent, and in a bright color

    Helmet cover - with a flap at the back to prevent water from running down your neck, and a bill in front to prevent water from running into your face

    Neoprene gloves, or waterproof mitts (shells)

    Neoprene booties or nylon booties (the neoprene will keep you drier, but the nylon are easier to carry)

    Rain pants ... I'm still looking for those myself

    And plastic bags by the hundreds to wrap everything you carry with you.
    I totally agree. The jacket must have pit zips and be breathable. Booties are incredibly important for comfort as shoes can take a long time to dry out. I use a shower cap as a quick helmet cover.

    As for the plastic bags, I use one for my saddle, but in the panniers (which the manufacters claims to be waterproof but invariably are not), I use those compression bags like the ones you see advertised on televison. They not only compress the size of your load but also make it waterproof.

  12. #12
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    I have a Marmot Precip jacket and pants. Just returned from an extended tour. It rained and it was cold (9 C.) for the first four days. The Precip kept me dry. It has long zippers under the armpits. The pants have velcro at the cuffs. It packs small and I found it quite adequate.

  13. #13
    Member Mel Wade's Avatar
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    I have the Marmot Precip as well. Works great!
    Mel Wade
    "I love it when a plan comes together" - Hannibal
    http://www.melwade.com

  14. #14
    Senior Member
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    The Red Ledge Thunderlight Parka is a cheap, light waterproof jacket that got favorable reviews from Backpacker mag. I have the jacket and pants and like it a lot:

    http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/st...berId=12500226

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