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Old 07-06-05, 08:59 PM   #1
Mentor58
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Cadence While Touring

Hey Gang,

I'm curious what kind of cadence you hold when touring, especially loaded touring. I'm not talking about the long steep slog, but going along on the imaginary smooth flat road with no wind. I've been doing a lot a training unloaded, and have found that I can ride a LOT easier at 95-105 then at my old 75-85 tempo. The legs feel a LOT better, hills are smaller and I'm better looking. (ok, 2 of the 3 are true). A lot of what I've been reading suggests that a 'touring cadence' is 80 or so, and a 'racing' cadence is up where I'm at.

Now my logical question is, "How the Heck does the bike know if it's touring or racing?" (ok, perhaps it's a bit of a retorical question) If my legs and lungs feel better at a higher cadence, wouldn't it make sense to gear for that kind of a cadence? Are there any good reasons NOT to tour at a higher cadence?

Thanks in Advance

Steve W.
Who looked at his teaching schedule, no long tours this summer
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Old 07-06-05, 11:37 PM   #2
Michel Gagnon
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For me, any cadence above 65-70 is decent, but my preferred cadence is around 80-90.

As to why the difference between touring and racing cadence: in the first case, the most important factor is to do the distance, be comfortable and remain fresh; with racing, the most important factor is to do the distance as fast as possible. I could even push the envelope and suggest riding for a whole day at 30-40 rpm: it is the most comfortable, non-tiring cadence... except you won't go anywhere unless you push the pedals really hard.
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Old 07-07-05, 05:03 AM   #3
gregw
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"If my legs and lungs feel better at a higher cadence, wouldn't it make sense to gear for that kind of a cadence?"

Yes! There is no one right cadence, I have a friend with tree trunk legs and he could never get them moving at 95-100 rpms, but he can push big gears at 50 rpms all day long. My interpretation of the cadence "rule" is that within your own range, faster is better than slower.

"the imaginary smooth flat road with no wind."

Yes! This is an imaginary road!
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Old 07-07-05, 04:07 PM   #4
catfish
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It depends on a number of things., but i feel best at 80 rpm while touring. Going up hill most times lowers my cadance. Ont he road bike however I feel best at 90 rpm. Most people have an ideal cadance fot them and their set up
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