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Old 12-20-06, 09:07 PM   #201
DavidARayJaxNC
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Originally Posted by ZootNerper
As we're on the topic, the absolutely best way of clearing up is water. I live in Thailand and every toilet has a tub of water for flushing and washing. You do your business and then use a bowl (some places have a hose) to run water down your bum and use your other hand to aid the washing. For cleanliness it's the business - no more skid marks on your shreddies. Try it and you'll never look back again! (so to speak)

(Thai toilet paper is no good for wiping as it's only designed to dab dry.)

When I go home (UK) I take a water bottle with me so I can use this technique in more "primitive" conditions. It's the red one - at least I think it's the red one! I keep this one on the bottom of my 3 water cages that I can't get access to unless I stop.

Saves on carrying paper and cleaner too. Want to dry off? Pull up your pants.
In Iraq all the iraqi carry water bottles to the portajohns. it is the funniest thing. we asked our interpreter how to get some toilet paper and he didnt even know why we would need it.
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Old 12-23-06, 08:51 PM   #202
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For a cheap and light-weight cable cutter, use a nail clippers. You can buy one for about a buck-fifty. Not shop quality, but good on a tour.
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Old 12-29-06, 01:54 AM   #203
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David in PA
This is a no brainer, but always bring some antibiotic ointment with you.
On a short day trip once I had a mild fall, and cut the bottom front of my ankle. I decided to use the ointment and a bandage every day until it healed. After about eight weeks, it still had not completed healed, so I went to the doc. He explained that the antibiotic ointment does indeed help prevent infection, but using it for too long can actually slow or prevent full healing.

I promptly stopped using the ointment, and my cut was fully healed in about a week.

David in PA
I use sulpha powder instead of antibacterial creams, and keep the wound open. I am not a doc.

I can't find powder as easily as tablets which i make into powder. Maybe it heals because it dries the wound out.

Erik
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Old 12-29-06, 06:15 AM   #204
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Originally Posted by DavidARayJaxNC
In Iraq all the iraqi carry water bottles to the portajohns. it is the funniest thing. we asked our interpreter how to get some toilet paper and he didnt even know why we would need it.
Not really funny at all as it's a religious reqirement for Muslims.
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Old 12-30-06, 10:30 AM   #205
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http://www.amazon.com/Well-Fed-Backp...e=UTF8&s=books


Read and heed.
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Old 12-30-06, 02:22 PM   #206
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Store spices in large "icee" straws by cutting 2 1/2" pieces off. "crunch" one end then fold down. Slip 1/2" piece over the fold to secure. Fill with desired spice and repeat to seal.
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Old 01-02-07, 11:36 AM   #207
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As a touring cyclist, you are more up close and personal with road kill than the rest of the population. Please prevent some of this mayhem by rescuing the box turtle whenever you see one trying to cross the road. In my last tour, I stopped literally dozens of times to move the critters out of harms way. They say it brings you good luck, too.

David in FL.
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Old 01-04-07, 05:23 PM   #208
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RiotBoi, that is a cool idea. I shall pass that along to the backpacker crowd as well.
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Old 01-04-07, 05:56 PM   #209
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Originally Posted by onbike 1939
Not really funny at all as it's a religious reqirement for Muslims.
I know that, but I could never get an explaination on why they have to use water. I know many non-muslims that do it too. I know its the trendy thing to do there, I guess.
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Old 01-11-07, 07:33 PM   #210
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Here's a silly question...what do you do with the box at the airport? I mean, you obviously don't haul it around the country. Can you buy bike boxes at airports?
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Old 01-12-07, 08:54 AM   #211
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Originally Posted by onbike 1939
Not really funny at all as it's a religious reqirement for Muslims.

You really gotta wonder about a religion that dictates how one takes a dump...
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Old 01-25-07, 10:14 AM   #212
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Originally Posted by Machka
Have you ever actually tried this? I have read similar instructions and thought to myself, OK, that's simple ... and then this year I actually tried it. Here's how it really goes ...

-- Attach something heavy to one end of the rope (i.e. rock, lock, etc.).
-- Look for suitable branch.
-- Discover that the pine trees around your campground all have short, spindly little branches about 20-30 ft above the ground.
-- Knowing that you not only have to have your food in the air to keep it away from the bears, but also away from any surrounding trees because black bears will climb trees and will try to reach the cache, choose the longest, most substantial branch you can find.
-- Lob the heavy end of the rope toward the branch. Miss.
-- Lob the heavy end of the rope toward the branch. Miss badly.
-- Lob the heavy end of the rope toward the branch. Get it caught another branch. Struggle to retrieve it.
-- Lob the heavy end of the rope toward the branch. Miss, again .......... and repeat. Get everyone in the camp to give it a go. Eventually someone will get it over the branch ... but it will be too close to the tree. Pull it down.
-- Lob the heavy end of rope toward the branch .....
-- When you finally get the rope over the most suitable part of the branch - high enough and far enough out from all surrounding trees ...
-- Tie the bag full of food, shampoo, soap, toothpaste, gatorade, and anything that remotely has a "nice" smell to it to the other end of the rope.
-- Start to haul it up.
-- Leap out of the way when the branch breaks because it was too spindly, or the bag of stuff was too heavy, or both.
-- Divide the stuff up into two bags.
-- Find a second rope.
-- Repeat from beginning, hoping that this time the branches you have chosen will hold.

This can be an entire evening's entertainment!!
One night while doing the above in Algonquin Park, it got dark before I managed to get the rope over a viable branch. Defeated, I remembered what I had read in Ray Jardine's book on hiking the PCT. I simply walked 50m off the hiking trail/bear path, found a spot with no obvious animal paths, and dropped my bag on the ground. I'm sure the local bear/raccoon/chipmunk thoroughly inspected my site for hanging food bags, but they never found the one laying on the ground just 50m away.
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Old 02-06-07, 08:30 PM   #213
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Originally Posted by Bikepacker67
You really gotta wonder about a religion that dictates how one takes a dump...
After several conversations with Turks in Turkey I actually wonder why it is we use paper. Don't kid yourself, waters actually a lot cleaner providing you wash your hands afterwards.
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Old 02-20-07, 05:40 AM   #214
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Originally Posted by Bikepacker67
You really gotta wonder about a religion that dictates how one takes a dump...
It dosen't, it just says you have to wash your face, hands, feet, bum and genitals before praying - so, they do it while at the toilet.

What do you think the alternative was before pulping rainforests became popular?
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Old 03-07-07, 02:37 PM   #215
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What do you think the alternative was before pulping rainforests became popular?
You misunderstand... I could care less how one does their "business".
I just bristle at religious dictates. To be perfectly frank, I hold all fundamentalist ideologies in equal contempt.

Whether it be christians that withhold medical treatment for their children because "God" will take care of it, or the moses worshipers that think of themselves as the "Chosen People" or the mohammedans that believe that a raped women deserved it, and thus should be stoned.

They're equal idiots in my book.
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Old 03-16-07, 10:22 AM   #216
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Another parking brake tip:

If you're running newer road caliper (the kind that have the lever on them to loosen the caliper so you can more easily remove the wheel), you can adjust the cable on the brakes as usual, but with the lever in the open, loose position, and then flip the lever to tighten the brake to use it as a parking brake. Very simple and easy to use. More of a theft deterrent than the velcro trick, as it's mechanically obvious what is causing the bike not to move in the latter case. When it's the brake itself, it's much less obvious (in fact, i often still fool myself). Still, you should just be using a lock if you're interested in theft deterrence. Working as a messenger, i've used this trick as a backup when i forgot my lock at the hang-out spot or whatever.

The obvious side-effect, of course, is that it's harder to remove the wheel, unless you're running thin road tires (unlikely on a tour). The other thing is that your wheel has to be totally true, or you won't be able to tighten the brake adjustment enough for the lever to actually stop the wheel. It works best on the front.
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Old 04-12-07, 04:03 AM   #217
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bikepacker67
You misunderstand... I could care less how one does their "business".
I just bristle at religious dictates. To be perfectly frank, I hold all fundamentalist ideologies in equal contempt.

Whether it be christians that withhold medical treatment for their children because "God" will take care of it, or the moses worshipers that think of themselves as the "Chosen People" or the mohammedans that believe that a raped women deserved it, and thus should be stoned.

They're equal idiots in my book.

Have to step in here.
While i dislike fundamentalists equally as well, i think your judgement stems from insufficient knowledge of the religions. Muslims don't believe a raped woman deserved it, the chosen people mostly see themselves as the "choosing" people, and the Christians...Well, can't help you there, but determinists are not hard to find in any religion and people.

As for religious dictates - they may seem funny before you take the time to understand them, but once they're explained, you realize that there's very simple, practical, human-oriented logic behind them.
Islam doesn't tell you to wash your bum with water. It tells you to do so 5 times a day (number of prayers), so that you remain clean and not die at the age of 22 from infections. The fact that they took it too literally and haven't updated the directive to just plain "wash your hands after wiping your bum" is a different matter.
Disclaimer - i do not believe in God, my father is Jewish and my mother a Shi'ite Muslim. I've just recently begun to look into Judaism, and realized that it's not a stupid as it looks from the outside.

And so as not to hijack the thread - When touring with a slower, weaker partner who is drafting you in windy conditions, tie a plastic bag to the tip of your handlebar, tear open the closed end to allow air flow, and voila, no more guessing as to where it's most efficient to be drafting from.
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Old 04-15-07, 07:37 AM   #218
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bikepacker67
You misunderstand... I could care less how one does their "business".
I just bristle at religious dictates. To be perfectly frank, I hold all fundamentalist ideologies in equal contempt. Whether it be christians that withhold medical treatment for their children because "God" will take care of it, or the moses worshipers that think of themselves as the "Chosen People" or the mohammedans that believe that a raped women deserved it, and thus should be stoned. They're equal idiots in my book.
I really don't think it's productive to hijack a thread and use it as a pulpit for spewing out uninformed anti-religious bigotry. These are bike forums, after all.

I don't agree with the Islamic fundamentlists on most issues either, but you're highlighting one particular point of belief (medical treatment, chosen people, ****), twisting it slightly and misleading readers to the conclusion that all such religious belief is invalid and followers are condemned as
"idiots" in "your book". Glad most of the major religions in the world aren't based on "your book".

Bike touring is about enjoying life, nature, and people. If one's thinking is so distorted that they have nothing but "contempt" for people of differing views, one might want to re-think their desire to tour on a bicycle, at least beyond the confines of their own city or town. One of the joys of touring is the experience of diversity in life, nature and.... people.
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Old 04-15-07, 10:55 AM   #219
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Originally Posted by ibimus
Here's a silly question...what do you do with the box at the airport? I mean, you obviously don't haul it around the country. Can you buy bike boxes at airports?
Wow!
An on-topic question. I'm going to try to ignore it and post some hate message.

Sorry, can't do it.

As to the box question: Be warned there are two trains of thought on this one in this forum. One says you buy some expensive box and then either pay to store it or send it by FedEx. Either way you are spending money for nought and have to return from the same portal. You can probably tell I don't subscribe to that.

I ride my bike to the airport, turn the handles, lower the tire pressure and remove the pedals. I bungee the front wheel to the frame (to keep it from turning) and stuff it into a heavy plastic bag I have purchased from the airline for the princely sum of $5.

At the other end, I retrieve my bike, tear it out of the bag, turn the bars, pump up the tires and replace the pedals and bike away. Sometimes I just roll it onto a train. Europeans are funny that way, they have train stations at airports.

Some people think this is crazy, but that's the way I do it and it works. I can start out at one place and leave from another and never even pay for a hotel if I don't want to.

Oh, and one more thing. Some forum members complain about baggage handlers from certain airlines. In my part of the world it is the airport who highers the baggage handlers, not the airlines. The airlines are merely stuck with the choice the airport authority makes. Some are competent, some are crooks. Sadly the airline can't do much about it and the airline authorities often choose not to.
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Old 04-23-07, 11:01 PM   #220
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Just in a bag? And the front wheel stays on? never heard of that method, but I like it! (I'm very good at taking things apart, and absolutely horrible at putting them back together again.)
Thank you very much! That saves me a lot of grief!

And, to just keep on with these questions, who do I ask about the plastic bag? The people at the ticket counter, security.....?

And I guess I'd have to figure out what to do with my luggage. I'm thinking of taking a trailer instead of panniers....I suppose the trailer could go through as is, and the box which holds my things (tent, clothes and the like) could also go through just as it is. Any experience with trailers and containers?
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Old 04-24-07, 12:54 PM   #221
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Originally Posted by ibimus
Just in a bag? And the front wheel stays on? never heard of that method, but I like it! (I'm very good at taking things apart, and absolutely horrible at putting them back together again.)
Thank you very much! That saves me a lot of grief!

And, to just keep on with these questions, who do I ask about the plastic bag? The people at the ticket counter, security.....?

And I guess I'd have to figure out what to do with my luggage. I'm thinking of taking a trailer instead of panniers....I suppose the trailer could go through as is, and the box which holds my things (tent, clothes and the like) could also go through just as it is. Any experience with trailers and containers?
Air Transat will sell you a bike bag for $5. I buy two, one for the return flight.

Also, what airlines publish on their websites and what employees seem to think are the rules vary greatly. I suggest a print-out from the website to end any disagreements.

Check with your airline about rules surrounding bikes et al. I'm allowed a free bike in a bag and 20 kgs of camping gear. The trailer may qualify as camping equipment. Again, each airline seems to have diiferent policies.
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Old 05-03-07, 05:58 AM   #222
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im down with the sarong, but im not sure how its going to go over ass i pass thourgh South Dakota.
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Old 05-18-07, 02:33 PM   #223
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im down with the sarong, but im not sure how its going to go over ass i pass thourgh South Dakota.
It should go over just like it did in the neighboring states unless you are expecting said kester to get bigger when you cross the border. Bee sting? Bug bite? More muscles because of hill climbing? Generally larger gluts in South Dakota?

I'm sorry, that was just too easy
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Old 05-25-07, 08:16 PM   #224
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stokell
Wow!
An on-topic question. I'm going to try to ignore it and post some hate message.

Sorry, can't do it.

As to the box question: Be warned there are two trains of thought on this one in this forum. One says you buy some expensive box and then either pay to store it or send it by FedEx. Either way you are spending money for nought and have to return from the same portal. You can probably tell I don't subscribe to that.

I ride my bike to the airport, turn the handles, lower the tire pressure and remove the pedals. I bungee the front wheel to the frame (to keep it from turning) and stuff it into a heavy plastic bag I have purchased from the airline for the princely sum of $5.

At the other end, I retrieve my bike, tear it out of the bag, turn the bars, pump up the tires and replace the pedals and bike away. Sometimes I just roll it onto a train. Europeans are funny that way, they have train stations at airports.

Some people think this is crazy, but that's the way I do it and it works. I can start out at one place and leave from another and never even pay for a hotel if I don't want to.

Oh, and one more thing. Some forum members complain about baggage handlers from certain airlines. In my part of the world it is the airport who highers the baggage handlers, not the airlines. The airlines are merely stuck with the choice the airport authority makes. Some are competent, some are crooks. Sadly the airline can't do much about it and the airline authorities often choose not to.
+1 For the 'disposable box' side of the argument. I fly there with a cardboard box I get from any bike shop, leave that box in the airport, and have a devil of a time finding another one in the town/city that I'm departing from, but it always seems to work out. Also, as long as you're not leaving everything up to the last minute, if you can't find a bike box, go scavenging for any large cardboard boxes - making your own box out of a few others isn't too hard.
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Old 06-04-07, 08:08 AM   #225
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Airlines have bags,Bus lines have boxes....Go to Greyhound parcel delivery Dept...they have boxes there
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