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  1. #1
    My custom user title. kdos's Avatar
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    Any vegans here?

    Are there any vegans here that can give me some examples of your own food choices while on tour?

  2. #2
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
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    I'm not a vegan, but I understand that Donald Watson, who founded the Vegan movement is will celebrate his 95th birthday tomorrow!
    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  3. #3
    Member bikeguru's Avatar
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    Hey KDOS I am a vegan too and enjoy my cycling as well as my food. Your food intake depends on how long you are going for weekend touring is easy because you can take all you need from home. Rice and couscous are great as bulk just add some vegies. Depending on where you live here in Australia freeze dried vegies like peas and beans etc are readly available in supermarkets so easy to cary and dont take up too much space. I am a firm believer in peanut butter or Vegemite sanwiches for snacks and lunches. Black coffee is fine if you dont like the taste by its self try adding 2 sugars or black tea is also no hassle for weekend trips I will take a couple of small uht soymilks so I can enjoy my coffee or cereal also many mixed type cereals are fine with water if it is not to your taste try adding some extra chopped nuts or fruit. I try to keep an open mind and will buy up on things as I go if I stop at a shop for something and they have something I can eat I will buy two of them one for now one for later. i have read and heard of people that have toured the world and Australia who are vegan no problem Cheers and good luck Bikeguru.

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    Used to be vegetarian a few years ago... for some obscure ethical reasons that had nothing to do with animal well being.

    It turns out I like meat too much... I still think there are numerous reasons to eat less meat (health, environment, ...) but I find it very hard to resist steak, duck, 'charcuteries', etc.

  5. #5
    Gordon P
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    Hi, Iím vegetarian with a limited ovo-lacto intake and I find that when I am travelling/cycle-touring my use of animal products increases. Not sure where you live, but if you are travelling in the major urban centres of the English speaking world you should have no problem being vegan. However, when on the road and in rural areas I find it very difficult to eat healthy and sometimes all there is to eat are dairy/egg products. If you are planning on short trips, try preparing dried meals before you leave and cook them on a cook stove or in a youth hostel memberís kitchen with added local produce. If you plan to eat in restaurants, you will find your choices limited and if you donít have a good grasp of the local language, your diet may suffer. Eating healthy food is very important while on the road, so prepare as much as you can in advance and if travelling in a place where you donít speak the language, you may want to learn about the local vegan cuisine and where the vegan/vegetarian restaurants are located by searching the web and asking at the local tourist office.
    Good luck and Bon appetit!

  6. #6
    Senior Member gregw's Avatar
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    I feel sorry for vegetarians, I have a friend touring in Maine and Nova Scotia right now and he is missing out on the Digby scallops and the Maine Lobster. To each his own, but why leave out some of the best parts?

  7. #7
    My custom user title. kdos's Avatar
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    Giving up eating those types of things is a small sacrifice to make for doing something that you feel is right.

    Personally, I don't feel as if I'm missing out on anything. I acknowledge that meat tastes good, as I've eaten it in the past, but I do not crave it anymore. I'm sure many vegetarians/vegans feel this way.

    I don't even eat the fake stuff anymore.

  8. #8
    Senior Member gregw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdos
    Giving up eating those types of things is a small sacrifice to make for doing something that you feel is right.

    Personally, I don't feel as if I'm missing out on anything. I acknowledge that meat tastes good, as I've eaten it in the past, but I do not crave it anymore. I'm sure many vegetarians/vegans feel this way.

    I don't even eat the fake stuff anymore.
    I am sure you are right, my comments were not meant to offend in any way, it's just that food is such a passion of mine.

  9. #9
    Macro Geek
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    I became a vegetarian in my early-20s, almost 30 years ago. (I have never been interested in being a vegan, though.) I don't remember missing meat and seafood during the early years, and I certainly don't miss them now.

    I have had a longstanding love-affair with food and cooking, so always eaten well. Good food is good food, any way you slice it. A pizza with a crispy, ultra-thin, homemade crust slathered with fresh pesto (the basil harvested from my garden that morning), and topped with grilled eggplant and red peppers and local artisanal cheese tastes fantastic. It doesn't need pepperoni to be totally toothsome!

    I do find it vital to eat well while touring. I am not an expert on nutrition, but I know no reasons why vegans cannot be well-nourished on the road. The only nutrient that vegans cannot obtain from natural sources is Vitamin B12, but it can be gotten from a multi-vitamin. Iron can be a problem, too; ditto for ovo-lacto vegetarians, but my iron levels have always tested normal. Protein is not a problem. The plant world abounds in protein-rich foods, so it is not necessary to eat meat/fish if one chooses not to. There is no difference in the quality of protein from animal and plant sources, although herbivores need to understand how to combine protein sources to ensure that the amino acids they contain complement one another. (Itís trivially easy to do.)

    Overall, while touring, I have not found it impossible to eat the way I want to, but it can be challenging.

  10. #10
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    I'm new to touring but not the vegan thing. I was vegan from '98 up until this year (now I eat eggs and dairy). I was at REI last night and saw a bunch of veggie and some vegan food in their camping section. If you have a REI nearby go check it out. If not look it up on the web: http://www.rei.com/category/4500533....HP_CAMPING_TOC

    You can also checkout replies to a similar post here:
    http://www.vegsource.com/talk/vegani...ges/15570.html

  11. #11
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    I went on a 600 mile tour back in July, the hottest time of the year. I subsisted on Clif bars, pasta with potatoes, oatmeal, peaches, bananas, nuts, and lots and lots of water.

    Vegans rock!!!


    GQ

  12. #12
    Vehicular orange's Avatar
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    I haven't toured much, but I basically eat peanut butter, granola, fruit and water. Not a vegan "off tour" but I find my stomach gives me less trouble that way.

  13. #13
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    This thread seems worth a bump

    I'm a lifelong vegetarian who has been eating an increasingly vegan diet. I don't subscribe to vegan ethics, being a new and enthusiastic Brooks owner and silk wearer with a down sleeping bag, but food that doesn't come from animals makes me feel stronger and calmer at the same time; it's a vitality thing.

    I'm no use for touring advice, and I'd love to hear from vegan tourers as to what they like to eat. I run on as much fruit as possible, avocados when I can get them, potatoes, bread, pasta, hummus...some of these things will be available in the heartland, bananas (yes the sweet kind) are a dietary staple in much of the world and if you eat them a little on the raw side they have still have a blend of simple and complex carbohydrates. Touring in the summer should be a paradise for vegans, stopping at every rural fruit stand and picking a few pounds of rehydrating, remineralizing fruits for the eating. Peanut butter, red lentils which cook down quick, canned beans, fresh peas, trail mix...

    besides beef jerky and macaroni and cheese, what trail foods aren't vegan?

  14. #14
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atman
    This thread seems worth a bump

    I'm a lifelong vegetarian who has been eating an increasingly vegan diet. I don't subscribe to vegan ethics, being a new and enthusiastic Brooks owner and silk wearer with a down sleeping bag, but food that doesn't come from animals makes me feel stronger and calmer at the same time; it's a vitality thing.

    I'm no use for touring advice, and I'd love to hear from vegan tourers as to what they like to eat. I run on as much fruit as possible, avocados when I can get them, potatoes, bread, pasta, hummus...some of these things will be available in the heartland, bananas (yes the sweet kind) are a dietary staple in much of the world and if you eat them a little on the raw side they have still have a blend of simple and complex carbohydrates. Touring in the summer should be a paradise for vegans, stopping at every rural fruit stand and picking a few pounds of rehydrating, remineralizing fruits for the eating. Peanut butter, red lentils which cook down quick, canned beans, fresh peas, trail mix...

    besides beef jerky and macaroni and cheese, what trail foods aren't vegan?
    Freeze dried back packing food, as well as Tuna, Crabmeat, Salmon, Pemmican,
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


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  15. #15
    Hairy Member Crankypants's Avatar
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    I love these topics! I eat RAW. Tons of fresh veges and fruits. I get my fuel power from high FAT fuels. Here in Southern France, these are available in olives, walnuts, almonds, and avocados. If you are lucky, and live in the tropics, cacao an coconuts are the best superfoods around! There are enormous choices when it comes to making a bomber salad with whatever local good you can score at the market. Just throw in tons of seeds (pumpkin, MMMMMM!) or tahini if you need some fat burning energy! Eating raw is cool because you don't have to lug around a gas stove or stinky fuel. And your body feels soo light and full of energy! Try it on your next tour and see. I'll be doing another "expedition" along the Raid Pyreneen with my wife so I'll let you all know how it goes. I am getting older, and I demand a lot from my body, so I have been tweaking it to find the optimum fuel to keep it fully charged up. Besides, your body odor really changes drastically for the better when you give up animal products, cooked food, junk. Vegan taste better!

  16. #16
    wonderer, wanderer gonesh9's Avatar
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    When I was on tour in the Eastern Oregon desert my gear weighed way too much with all the avocadoes, fruit, grains, and nuts. But I ate well and had a great time anyways. There's plenty of vegan instant meals out there that you just add boiling water to that would work just fine. But it is nice to have some whole foods with you. Lots of pre-made PB&J sandwiches is good too. The real problem was not being able to carry much beer.

  17. #17
    Bike touring webrarian
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    I just finished a short (5 day) tour around the SF Bay area. I staying in campgrounds that weren't near a town (Samuel P. Taylor and Bodega Dunes state parks--both highly recommended and with Hike/Bike areas). For two dinners, I bought 2 packages of Raman and a large stalk of broccoli when I passed a grocery store. I steamed the broccoli in little water. By the time the Raman was done steeping, the broccoli was succulent. It would be easy to add other vegetables, carrots and peppers come to mind, depending on the size of your cooking pot.

    This does require 2 pots.

    Also, for a bit more adventure, you could pack some corn starch and make a great sauce by using 2 cups of liquid (the amount required for 1 package of raman) and 4 tablespoons of corn starch and letting it boil.

    For my other dinners, I made pasta, adding parmesan cheese, crushed red peppers and oregano. This could also have broccoli added to it (I had a big Chinese meal that day and didn't need the veggies).

    I think broccoli is the perfect vegetable and try to eat some every day, even when touring.

    Ray

  18. #18
    delete folders. Beatsalad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankypants
    I love these topics! I eat RAW. Tons of fresh veges and fruits. I get my fuel power from high FAT fuels. Here in Southern France, these are available in olives, walnuts, almonds, and avocados. If you are lucky, and live in the tropics, cacao an coconuts are the best superfoods around! There are enormous choices when it comes to making a bomber salad with whatever local good you can score at the market. Just throw in tons of seeds (pumpkin, MMMMMM!) or tahini if you need some fat burning energy! Eating raw is cool because you don't have to lug around a gas stove or stinky fuel. And your body feels soo light and full of energy! Try it on your next tour and see. I'll be doing another "expedition" along the Raid Pyreneen with my wife so I'll let you all know how it goes. I am getting older, and I demand a lot from my body, so I have been tweaking it to find the optimum fuel to keep it fully charged up. Besides, your body odor really changes drastically for the better when you give up animal products, cooked food, junk. Vegan taste better!
    people who eat raw are just pretentious... who does this guy think he is?

  19. #19
    Hairy Member Crankypants's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beatsalad
    people who eat raw are just pretentious... who does this guy think he is?
    Perhaps you think I was pretentious for saying the statment about body odor, or was it something else? Anyway, obviously I posted something that rubbed you the wrong way, and I was only trying to share some of my ideas. Personally, I don't feel that I have found all the "right" answers to living healthy, but I was excited about the things that are helping me feel better. Anyway, I don't think that you would find me pretentious if you met me in person, too bad I came across that way. Anyway, Bonne Route!

  20. #20
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    Raw food is incredibly satisfying stuff. Who could say no to a ripe peach? Raw foods have all sorts of nutrients we plain won't get in other foods, and everyone's diet should be rich in them; that is the consensus of the nutritional community.

    When I was a teenager, my day would begin with eggs, i'd drink a coca cola before lunch, where I would drink coffee with sugar and cream, eat french fries (invariably) sometimes with a grilled cheese (I was still vegetarian) and smoke numerous clove cigarettes throughout the day. More soda, anything at all for dinner (pizza was popular/cheap)...if I tried to run on that now I would shut down in about a day, and that was ten years ago for me. Maybe a few years of increasingly vegan living will draw me towards an all raw diet, but for now I eat a lot of cooked foods and it feels good to me.

    I haven't found an all-raw diet that my body finds satisfying. What astonishes me is how easy it is to go a few days without any raw food at all, and how *bad* I feel when I do. At the same time, freshly baked natural-leavened bread is so satisfying a food, and my body is so attracted to it, that I may never abandon it as a staple. I prefer some vegetables cooked (asparagus, broccoli) and others raw (carrots, most of the 'fruit vegetables' like tomato and avocado); some foods like beans are poisonous or non-nutritious in their raw state and must be dried and sprouted to eat that way; they cook up fine.

    One interesting change is that I used to view plain sour yogurt as a delicious living food that gave me strength and helped me to digest cheese. Now I don't enjoy the flavor or effects. Something changed; if it changes back I'll eat the stuff again. I'm not doing a lot of cheese digesting these days.

    I know a guy with no colon who eats almost entirely meats on the advice of his physician. I don't get it, and I can't imagine it, but it is apparently what his body needs so who am I to judge? My parents, after raising me and my brother as vegetarians, reverted to the eating of fish and fowl shortly after for health reasons not otherwise specified. You eat what your body wants.

    But I'd like to remind people that this is a thread for people interested in vegan diet to discuss how they handle touring. A thread on favorite meat treats or how pretentious vegan and raw types are might go somewhere else?

  21. #21
    nothing: lasts forever ink1373's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beatsalad
    people who eat raw are just pretentious... who does this guy think he is?
    this must be sarcasm, or just...i don't know...stupidity?

    there's a strict raw foodist or two somewhere in each of our lineages. eating raw is very satisfying.

  22. #22
    Senior Member bronskcloosper's Avatar
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    Beatsalad seems pretty cruddy to me... and seems pretty pro-veggie with a name like that.

  23. #23
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    I agree. During my tour I find that fruit, nuts, peanut butter sandwhiches support my diet. If I find that I have a taste for meat I also find that I am pissed off about something. So I find out what it is that I am pissed off about, it ain't about the meat.

    I'm a lifelong vegetarian who has been eating an increasingly vegan diet. I don't subscribe to vegan ethics, being a new and enthusiastic Brooks owner and silk wearer with a down sleeping bag, but food that doesn't come from animals makes me feel stronger and calmer at the same time; it's a vitality thing.

    I'm no use for touring advice, and I'd love to hear from vegan tourers as to what they like to eat. I run on as much fruit as possible, avocados when I can get them, potatoes, bread, pasta, hummus...some of these things will be available in the heartland, bananas (yes the sweet kind) are a dietary staple in much of the world and if you eat them a little on the raw side they have still have a blend of simple and complex carbohydrates. Touring in the summer should be a paradise for vegans, stopping at every rural fruit stand and picking a few pounds of rehydrating, remineralizing fruits for the eating. Peanut butter, red lentils which cook down quick, canned beans, fresh peas, trail mix...

    besides beef jerky and macaroni and cheese, what trail foods aren't vegan?[/QUOTE]

  24. #24
    get_nuts
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    Rice and tortillas are easier to store compared to bread or pasta. Pitas and nan and injera are also easy to store but hard to find outside of large cities (here in north america, anyways). Bread is bulky and gets squashed easily.

    Lentils cook much faster than dry beans. (canned beans weigh too much with all the extra water).

    Nutritional yeast is, well, nutritional as well as easy to store. Adds a lot of flavor to your food as well. I never ate vitamins on tour and did fine with this. Margarine and nutritional yeast on a bagel never gets old for me. Bagels are easy to find and are an easy low-prep snack. Vegan margarine is not so common unfortunately, so olive oil is a good second choice.

    I never carried much vegetables for long due to storage, but I was usually never far from a store where I could buy them.

    Be sure you know how to cook on your camping stove BEFORE you leave!

    I ate Co-Co Wheats most breakfasts and a box will provide more meals than, say, oatmeal of the same weight. Very easy to make but can be harder to clean from your dishes in the wild.

    Clif bars, Clif bars, Clif bars! Every variety is vegan. Good for when it's raining and your only alternative is to cook or buy more food. And for eating while riding. They're pretty compact for how much they provide.

  25. #25
    Senior Member bronskcloosper's Avatar
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    yeast is not vegan. you're killing hundreds small life forms with every bite. we should all be giving many props to the brave yeast who sacrafice their lives for our flavor and bread levening needs.

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