Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    You Have $1000 For Touring Bike- How Do You Spend It?

    I am a college student with limited resources, planning a trip over summer.

    So, you are going on a 40+ day multi-state trip on a shoestring. You have $1000 to spend on bike, any upgrades, panniers, and racks. Additionally, extra tubes and tools come out of the $1000. If you are buying online, gots to factor in shipping.

    Do you go hybrid and upgrade, or buy a budget touring bike and buy/ build cheap panniers? What brand/ model? Can it be done?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Posts
    152
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Find a used touring bike preferably off of craigslist or something local (vs. ebay) and spend the rest on quality racks and panniers. $1000 should get you a pretty long ways.

    edit: you can sometimes find trek 520's or cannondale t800's used by people that planned a big trip and didn't go. Thats what I did and it worked out fine, the bike had very few miles on it. Good luck!

  3. #3
    your nightmare gal chipcom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    The Cracker Factory
    Posts
    24,353
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For a new bike on that budget, I would choose a Breezer Greenway, which you can get for about $700, maybe cheaper if you can find a closeout. It already has a rack, fenders, front & rear dynamo driven lights and is geared for touring. No upgrades required, leaving you $300 for panniers and other essentials.

    You might also check E-bay or Craigslist for (edit: used) touring bikes like the Trek 520, Fuji Touring or Cannondale T-800.
    Last edited by chipcom; 01-07-06 at 07:38 PM.
    "Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey

  4. #4
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Denver, CO
    My Bikes
    Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
    Posts
    15,632
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tboneloser22
    I am a college student with limited resources, planning a trip over summer.

    So, you are going on a 40+ day multi-state trip on a shoestring. You have $1000 to spend on bike, any upgrades, panniers, and racks. Additionally, extra tubes and tools come out of the $1000. If you are buying online, gots to factor in shipping.

    Do you go hybrid and upgrade, or buy a budget touring bike and buy/ build cheap panniers? What brand/ model? Can it be done?

    Thanks
    For $1000 for everything, you can't expect to get even middle of the line equipment but you can do well enough for gear that will last you for several seasons. Most of us, even those with high zoot stuff, started out on a budget. We just had time to accumulate lots of it.

    Bike: Get a "real" touring bike. Don't go with a cheap hybrid and try to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear. Other's have suggested used, which can be cheap but you have to be in the right place at the right time. There are some old Treks, Cannondales, Miyatas and others out there. New may be better. Look for a Fuji Touring. It's a good solid bike for around $800. But be aware that touring bikes, in general, are hard to find.

    Racks: Delta front racks are ugly but functional. Delta rear racks are good values and reasonably strong. Blackburn racks are good also. I've used them for ages and never broken one.

    Bags: You may not be able to afford good waterproof bags but that's why Ziplocks were invented Just pack each day's worth of cloths in a ziplock (bike short, jersey, sock) and put them in your bag. I have waterproof bags and I still do this. It organizes them well. Check Nashbar. Don't get the biggest ones you can. 4 smaller bags are better than two very large bags. Load 60% of your weight over the front wheel. The bike handles better that way.

    Overall, if you are smart, shop closeouts and look for deals at all kinds of locations, you should be able to pick up everything for around $1000. Should be a piece of cake, actually.
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  5. #5
    Older I get, Better I was velonomad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Schenectady NY & Wilmington NC
    My Bikes
    a bunch of them, most made by me, a couple made by others
    Posts
    1,630
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not much new to choose from in that price range you have, This Bike at Performance Bike shop has the braze-ons you need for pannier racks, Deore derailluers and shifters , $549 on sale but I would put touring tires on it and some bar- ends or a trekking bar for more comfort and better aerodynamics.


    BTW what are you riding now?

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    My Bikes
    Spec Roubaix Apex, Cannondale T2000, Cannondale Rize, Stumpjumper M5 Comp
    Posts
    819
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oh this is easy. First of all, don't buy a hybrid and don't buy new, you'll get a lot more for your buck going "lightly used", with a stronger bike. I have a couple of thoughts, both based on my personal experience.

    Option 1 - For a road style setup, there are lots of used Trek 520's and Novara Randonee's around, check on Craigslist, espec in Calif.. Plan on around $600 for a 5-10 yrs old in bike good shape possibly with some extras. Mine is 10 years old and I would head across the country on it tomorrow, but I see many that are newer in that price range. Your bike will likely come with racks, but if not budget $100 for them and $2-300 for lightly used or new panniers on sale somewhere, espec this time of year. There are tons of panniers on Ebay for cheap - I got my like-new Arkels there (thanks Greg!) That leaves you a little change for a tune-up on it or spares, etc. You can definitely do this within your budget, and the great thing is you can sell it afterward if you want and not be out much change at all.

    Option 2 is even cheaper. Buy a used 10 yr old rigid (no susp fork) steel mtn bike like I just did for under $200 in great shape (Trek 970, chromo, lugged frame with XT components). Many of these are hardly used and there are lots of them so you don't need to take the first thing you find. If you get a top of the line one it will have excellent components, rack eyelets, and of course they have great gearing already. Have it serviced, check chain, cassette, and the wheels for true and bearings. New Continental Town and Country tires for $50/pr are pretty much bulletproof, great traction on/off road and roll well on pavement. Now for less than $400 you have a great all-around bike that will ride well (steel) and go the distance, even some off road if it's not too gnarly. You may want to add a higher stem and bar ends for comfort. On mine I added Jandd Extreme front and rear racks for $130, and a set of panniers (4) as mentioned is around $2-300. Your total investment would be under $800, leaving a bit left over for a better seat or clipless pedals if not included.

    Either bike will take you anywhere, the road-style setup will be a bit faster and cover longer distances, the converted mtn bike will do fine and add a bit more capability for dirt roads, mild trails, etc. Or you may just like the flat bar setup better. Both bikes are far stronger than a modern, cheap aluminum hybrid with wheels and components that are not up to the task of carrying a load for long distances.

    Have fun!
    Last edited by mtnroads; 01-07-06 at 08:16 PM.
    Specialized Roubaix SL4 Disc, Cannondale T2000 (touring), Stumpjumper M5 (Mtn - hardtail), Cannondale Rize4 (Mtn - full susp)

  7. #7
    littlecircles bmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    3,344
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Used Trek 520.
    Brooks Saddle.

    I'd buy Ortlieb bags... but you may not have enough $$.

  8. #8
    NoPo nateted4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Go Used +1

    You don't have the scratch to go new, but If you have any wrenching skills at all you should be able to pick out a used bike from Craigslist.
    Saddle Stitching is like Razorblades for Your Crotch.

  9. #9
    WATERFORD22
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Seattle
    My Bikes
    Bilenky, Co-Motion, 1969 Paramount, Waterford Adventure Cycle, Waterford rs 22, 1980 Davidson etc.
    Posts
    509
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sounds like you have time - do alittle digging to find out what makes a good touring frame. Recently there have been some Great deals on classic steel frame on ebay. Depending on your size, there a Miyata Grand Tour 57cm and a Dawes 59 on ebay as we speak as well as a used set of Bruce Gordon racks - all going cheap. Regularly on ebay you can get dURACE 9 speed bar end shifters for less than $50.00. You can easily assemble a first rate touring bike for $1,000 including racks and panniers - far superier to what a $1,000 will get you new, but it will take patience, a little luck, and work on your part

  10. #10
    The Recycled Cycler markwebb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    My Bikes
    Real Steel. Really. Ti is cool, too !
    Posts
    2,382
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Someone on another thread recommended this bike and it may be within your budget new

    http://www.jamisbikes.com/bikes/05_aurora.html#

    Looks like it has everything necessary to get started touring, and it can be constantly upgraded as your budget allows.

    One thing I have found in my 30+ years of cycling is you should buy the best frame/base bike you can possibly afford because you can always upgrade components, but that frame is what will carry you safely and comfortably for ll those miles. Buy a good basic solid bike, keep upgrading the parts, and hang on to it and the memories for a lifetime.

  11. #11
    vintage tourer
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    japan
    Posts
    198
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    - road bikes are the only way to go, unless you're planning on using unpaved roads, etc.
    - i'd recommend staying away from bikes with flat handle bars, which leave you with only 1 basic hand position for comfort, and cursing when the wind isn't with you.
    - if you're lucky you may find a good 2nd hand bike. otherwise, comparing lower-priced new models, i'd also recommend the jamis aurora.
    - here's a decent pair of panniers that won't break the bank: http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_d...=1136698992784

  12. #12
    Senior Member halfspeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    SE Minnesota
    My Bikes
    are better than yours.
    Posts
    11,180
    Mentioned
    38 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Go used. Tear it down, clean everything, fix anything worn. Then, you'll know everything about your bike and can fix most problems that can occur on tour.

  13. #13
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Denver, CO
    My Bikes
    Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
    Posts
    15,632
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by halfspeed
    Go used. Tear it down, clean everything, fix anything worn. Then, you'll know everything about your bike and can fix most problems that can occur on tour.
    Having to fix anything worn out is one of the reasons I wouldn't suggest going with a used bike. Replacing parts can quickly eat into his $1000 budget. Plus we don't know his level of mechanical expertise nor his knowledge level concerning touring bikes. Assessing whether or not a used bike is sound or whether it would make a good touring bike is not trivial.

    To tboneloser22: You've got time. Do some research about touring bikes. Not every bike out there makes for a good touring bike. Go to http://www.bicycletouring101.com/ or http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/?o=as as well as other sites and read, read, read!
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  14. #14
    Senior Member halfspeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    SE Minnesota
    My Bikes
    are better than yours.
    Posts
    11,180
    Mentioned
    38 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute
    Having to fix anything worn out is one of the reasons I wouldn't suggest going with a used bike. Replacing parts can quickly eat into his $1000 budget. Plus we don't know his level of mechanical expertise nor his knowledge level concerning touring bikes. Assessing whether or not a used bike is sound or whether it would make a good touring bike is not trivial.

    To tboneloser22: You've got time. Do some research about touring bikes. Not every bike out there makes for a good touring bike. Go to http://www.bicycletouring101.com/ or http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/?o=as as well as other sites and read, read, read!
    Having to replace worn out parts is part of the point of going used. Bike parts wear out. It's better to learn how to replace them and what the signs are long before ever hitting the road.

    Yes, it takes some research and some time to learn what a good deal and fit are so it won't be a good idea for anyone needing instant gratification. OTOH, is self-contained touring a good idea for the impatient anyway?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •