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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Is this a proper touring bike?

    Would appreciate your feedback on the suitability of this bike for touring:

    http://www.ridgebackbikes.co.uk/inde...Refresh%3Dtrue

    Is this a classic touring frame or more like a road bike frame with rack mounts?

    I'm particularly interested in whether or not the geometry is closer to road bike or tourer.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Tweaker-Tinkerer Lotum's Avatar
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    Looks like it is an Audax bike. The wheelbase and chainstays are too short for a serious touring bike.

  3. #3
    Senior Member halfspeed's Avatar
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    are better than yours.
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    You could make it work, but it would be suboptimal. You probably won't be able to get fat tires under the fenders, the gearing is kind of high, the geometry is a bit aggressive. Compare it to the Panorama from the same manufacturer. I don't know anything about the company, but the Panorama looks like a much more capable loaded tourer.

  4. #4
    Long Live Long Rides
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    Apr 2004
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    1988 Specialized Rockhopper Comp, converted for touring/commuting. 1984 Raleigh Team USA road bike.
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    Agreed. The shorter stays and compact geometry would make for a less comfortable ride long distance. The longer wheel based bikes flex more and smooth out the bumps.

    Of course, that said, one can really tour on just about any bike. Some bikes are more suited than others.
    Jharte
    Touring...therapy for the soul.

  5. #5
    cyclotourist
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    Quote Originally Posted by jharte
    Agreed. The shorter stays and compact geometry would make for a less comfortable ride long distance. The longer wheel based bikes flex more and smooth out the bumps.

    Of course, that said, one can really tour on just about any bike. Some bikes are more suited than others.
    What he said. You can tour on any bike, depending on what you want to carry, how far and fast you want to go, whether you are willing to push the bike.

    If you already have this bike it will work for you. If not, you might do better with something else as jharte and halfspeed noted.

    You won't get any agreement as to what is the best touring bike either. There have been some heated discussions on that, with die hard touring enthusiasts dissing their opponents choices and calling them names.

    The most important thing is to have the will to do it. The bike is secondary.

  6. #6
    Senior Member metal_cowboy's Avatar
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    Oct 2005
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    Orting Wa.
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    Rivendell Atlantis, Rivendell Rambouillet, Co Motion Big A,l Klein Adroit
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    As stated before, you can tour on any type of bike. If you are looking to buy from this manufacturer, the Panorama is an obvious choice for a touring bike. The Horizon is a little sleeker with its carbon fork, but if it is a touring bike you want, get the Panorama.
    Rivendell Alantis, Rivendell Rambouillet, Klein Adroit, Co Motion Big AL

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