Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 32
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    24
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    A Trans Canadian ..... wander

    Has anyone had the oppertunity to cross Canada on a bicycle. I've the oppertunity next Spring & am starting in St Johns, Newfoundland, traversing the Trans Labrador Highway before heading down to the St Lawrence. From there its a who knows, other than staying as far north & out of the cities. Depending on how well I do, I might venture up to Alaska, aiming for Prudhoe Bay.
    Any advice ....... or a helpful psychiatrist, would be greatful.

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    upstate New York
    Posts
    1,688
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Spring comes late in the Maritimes-snow is not uncommon even late in May. Also, the prevailing winds will be against you. If you start out too late from the east coast, you may run into early snows in the Rockies, where late August is not too early for a significant snowfall at high elevations. I'd think that your best bet would be to start from the west, and head east.
    Je vais à vélo, donc je suis!

  3. #3
    山馬鹿 Spire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan
    My Bikes
    TREK 1000 and a junk bike with a basket on the front to go to the shops.
    Posts
    1,398
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sounds interesting. But crossing Eastern Alberta, Saskatewan (sp?), Manitoba, and Western Ontario, would have to be super dull to me! flat dead strait roads surrounded by wheat fields.
    http://www.cyclistsroadmap.com/eng/ - Cyclists' road map. Checkout which roads are good for cycling and rate roads in your area.

  4. #4
    Year-round cyclist
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Montréal (Québec)
    Posts
    3,023
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I did Ontario and East by bike, and all Canada by car. As another said, Spring comes late in Newfoundland, and that's even worst in Labrador.

    Even if you were travelling only trough Newfoundland, I would say there is a very good likelyhood of snow on the ground in May. It's almost a certainty in Northern Newfoundland (even in June, mind you), and the weather will be even more frigid in Labrador. Two or three years ago, I went to teach a course in late April in Baie-Comeau and Fermont. Snow banks were still 7 ft high in Baie-Comeau and 9-ft high in Fermont. At that time, the Trans-Labrador highway was in gravel, so you might expect mud -- and a bit later flies by zillions. Someone posted a report of a trip by bike at the end of this Summer and no mention was made of gravel, so it might now be paved, but check beforehand so you know what to expect. Anyway, between Fermont and Baie-Comeau, there are 580 km of which some 150-200 are gravel.

    So basically, if you travel as planned, you should be prepared for 2-3 weeks of Winter weather, until you reach Baie-Comeau or Tadoussac. Another option would be to travel South through the Maritimes, then head North as you reach Central Québec and Ontario. BTW, expect fewer services than during the tourist season, and NONE between towns.

    In Québec, if you are enterprising, want to travel through forestry roads (and no services), you might go from Québec City to Rivière-à-Pierre to La Tuque to Clova to Parent to Senneterre, more or less following the CN railroad. The trip from Québec City to Senneterre would be approx. 700 km on earth and gravel roads, away from civilisation and services (no services in the "villages" between La Tuque and Senneterre).
    Some of these roads are vaguely traced on the Québec road map, but you would need a better map, local information and information from the ZECs (the sporting clubs around there) to know more. My recollection of the area is too vague to orient you.

    Another option in Québec would be to go to Québec City, then Montréal, either via #138 (quite scenic), or via Rivière-à-Pierre, Saint-Tite, Shawinigan, Charette, Saint-Paulin, Joliette, Repentigny and Montréal. The latter would be mostly on paved roads at the southern border of the Laurentians, through small villages.
    From Montréal, you might reach Val-d'Or and Rouyn-Noranda via "Le petit train du Nord" bike path (between Saint-Jérôme and Mont-Laurier), then highway 117 all the way (no alternative -- traffic, but paved shoulders most of the way)

    Ontario generally doesn't pave shoulders. If you take the Northern route (#11), you won't have too much traffic west of Kapuskasing, but services will be exactly each 100 km or 200 km. And this is one of the worst regions for bugs (try to set your camp in 10 s).

    In Manitoba, if you want to be North of civilisation, you'll start to have choices West of Winnipeg.

    As for winds, dominant winds are from the West, and I know this would be a real problem in Newfoundland, but not in most other parts of the prairies.

    Regards,
    Michel Gagnon
    Montréal (Québec, Canada)

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    366
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Originally posted by Spire
    Sounds interesting. But crossing Eastern Alberta, Saskatewan (sp?), Manitoba, and Western Ontario, would have to be super dull to me! flat dead strait roads surrounded by wheat fields.
    You are kidding right? There is more to Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba than flat prairie and wheat fields. This may be true of the southern portion of these provinces but the northern portions are heavily treed in boreal forest with many lakes. I'm pretty sure western Ontario is similar.


  6. #6
    Love Me....Love My Bike! aerobat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Winnipeg
    My Bikes
    Bikes: Giant hybrid, Trek 4500, Cannondale R800 Some commuting 20mi/day, mostly fitness riding - 20-50 mile rides
    Posts
    1,231
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You're right. Northwestern Ontario and eastern Manitoba is Canadian shield country. Lots of bush, rocks and hills. Even west of Winnipeg the prairie is broken up by river valleys every so often. If you take the Yellowhead route (Highway 16), which goes north of the Trans Canada Highway it is a little more interesting country, with some hills in the Minnedosa area.

    They always say the prevailing winds are westerley, and I would have to agree, but at any given time you can have local conditions affecting the weather, and get them from a different direction.

    In any case, you'll have an interesting trip, one I would love to take sometime. Maybe when I retire!
    "...perhaps the world needs a little more Canada" - Jean Chretian, 2003.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    217
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Aerobat-I am not sure that the Hwy #16 route in Mb.is the best idea. Very heavy truck route, small shoulders and not at all interesting until it merges with Hwy.10 at Minnedosa. I have never taken it on cycle, but have always thought of it as a dangerous route for a car let alone a bicycle. Better to go further on Trans-Canada to Hwy. #5 and north to Neepawa, then north on #5 to the hilly area or west to #10 and then north into the hills and Riding Mountain Park which can be travelled east to west on a car prohibited trail, linking up with Hwy#45 near Russell. But have you checked the Trans-Canada Trail as an option for the trip?

  8. #8
    Newbie Grisha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    My Bikes
    Treks
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Labrador in the spring is very risky. Late snowstorms are to be expected. Why not take the ferry to Nova Scotia, then cycle up through New Brunswick to Eastern Quebec. This route is much less risky weatherwise, and I think more interesting also. Don't worry, you'll have plenty of remote dirt roads to follow later if you choose to head up into the Yukon.

    Also, western Ontario is anything but flat. This area is very remote and while the highway is paved and often busy, you will be traversing some truely wilderness areas.

    Good luck, and have fun.
    Wagons! Westward... Ho!

  9. #9
    cane
    Guest
    I'd like to do Vancouver Island.

  10. #10
    Bash US - We'll Bash You
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    138
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Cane,
    Perhaps you should do Montreal instead. You and Velocipedio could go for a ride and share a few beers!
    I never saw an American flag burned at a *** show.

  11. #11
    cane
    Guest
    Martin, I would actually like to visit Mount Royal and Quebec City. I'd like to see the Montreal Canadiens play in a Stanley Cup playoff game.

    Contrary to what most members on this forum probably believe, I actually like Canada, and Canadians. This forum has been very helpful to me. I am developing a new sitcom for network television at the moment. One of the characters is going to be a recent Canadian immigrant to the USA: an economic refugee. One of his funnier traits is that he vigorously defends any type of criticism towards Canada, or Canadians, even though he himself often criticizes Canada (esp. about the low value of the dollar). Also, one of his more annoying and funny traits is that he constantly makes Pround references to athletes, actors, musicians etc. who happen to be Canadian. "Did you know that Neil Young is a Canadian?" "The captain of the Starship Enterprise--Bill Shatner is Canadian?" My work in the television and motion picture industry has brought me to Canada many times in the last 10 years. I have lived in Vancouver for months at a time. I have also worked in Victoria (a lovely city), and also Toronto.

    When I get some time I would like to tour Vancouver Island in July some day/some year.
    I'll Check out the surfing in Tofino.

    Once again, thanks to all who responded to my posts (flames). I gleaned some great info that might be used in the future. Cycle on dudes and dudettes!!!!

  12. #12
    Bash US - We'll Bash You
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    138
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Cane sounds good. If I watched tv I would tune it in. I don't patronize the self serving liberal bastards myself though.
    I never saw an American flag burned at a *** show.

  13. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    24
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thought I'd just post an update to a message I posted a while ago now.

    Spring came about & saw me getting on a plane & landing in Newfoundland, with a shiney new bike, some panniers & a mountain of gear sent via the postal system. I managed to reassemble the bike (just) ! & after a couple of days acclimatisation I packed & headed out. My bike stand sheered at my first walming break about an hour after starting & I wasn't even out of St Johns !!! I went on a bit of a De Tour around the Avalon Peninsular to begin with, which helped me settle into the ride & not make it a mad dash from A to B. In fact as I set out each day I had no knowing where I'd stop.( Cannot be doing with the people who plan to the minute degree what, when & where ........ get a life ).
    I acclimatised to the cooler weather as I traversed the island & then went up the Northern Peninsular, where after a day struggling into the Gros Morne Park I had two days of tail winds. Utter Bliss. I had stunning & dramatic views of the Mountains & Pack Ice. The covering of white powdery stuff grew the further north I went to. The Ferry accross to Labrador was still encased in ice so I took a short 10 min flight over to Blanc Sablon (just in Quebec) & then rode the road to Red Bay passing through a string of remote communities. From here I went along a gravel /snow road passing the coastal communities, a wonderful ride, if your into remoteness, as I am. One section wasn't complete yet & the locals had a laugh at my expense, when I had a day of pushing through the mud for 30 Km. It was a laugh. At Cartwright another flight beconed to Happy Valley/ Goose Bay. There the technically inept Mick (me) tinkered with my spokes in an attempt to 'true a wheel' & I knackered it. I still rode out though & got 60 miles along the Trans Labrador Highway (Top of Popes Hill) before it collapsed on me. I also had the trotts & could defecate through the eye of a needle ! ( Similar to when you have dodgey Curry). The final straw came when my snow anchors holding my tent down came loose & I had to continually keep securing them throughout the night ! (Granular snow & short pegs, not helped by the wind ). So as some 'Doom merchant' proficised on here I didn't get to ride the Trans Labrador Highway, I got a lift instead.
    In Labrador City I put a cork up my posterior, took a pannier full of tablets & meraculously got a new 700 wheel. I then managed to ride out along the 389 & successfully rode out to Baie Commeau & the St Lawrence. I like the 389, great road for isolation & the Logging Truck drivers looked after me. (Not joking either). Back in relative civilisation it was spot the idiot who was intent on wipping me out. Had a run in with a copper, who said I should be on a footpath & not a huge shoulder - Tosser, then in Forestville I nearly got knocked off twice in the space of 5 mins. The scene was then set to get out of Quebec as soon as practicable ! Which is exactly what I did. From Tadoussac I veered NW out to Chicoutami, Lac St Jean which was still covered in ice & then out towards Chibougami & Chapis to Amos, a really nice town.
    From here I used back roads to cross into Ontario & onto the main road just below Iroquis Falls. This then took me through Kapuskasing & Heast before being funnelled into the Thunder Bay corridor. Here I started seeing others who were doing threir own cycling tours. Through Kenora & into Manitoba & the 44 to near Winnipeg then a route to the north crossing over to Dauphin, Swan River & upto The Pas & finally Flin Flon. Here in Manitoba I battled with the wind for 5 days !!! Hardly saw a hill either.
    Into Saskatchewan I took a series of small roads, some gravel across the province. Had a few bear sightings to, which was great. I passed near La Ronge & through Meadow Lake. Again I found people on these small desolate roads really helpfull. They did take a toll on the bike mind. Various things started to wear & break with the constant abuse.
    Alberta next. Here I had to give up my ethos of a northerly crossing. I went through Cold & Slave Lake & below Peace River headed west, instead of north along the road towards Yellowknife & down the Liard Hwy. Instead I crossed to Dawson Creek in British Columbia & followed the Alaskan Highway upto the Yukon. Not a great route. The tossers in the RV's still think there in their cars, the truck drivers were fine though. Had some nice streches of scenery mind you & lots of wildlife encounters. Saw a bear most days.
    Into the Yukon, what a place. Full of people doing their own thing. As for the scenery - Stunning. Whilst there I was press ganged into the Haines Junction (Canada) to Haines (Alaska) Relay race. Had leg 6, the easiest ! Phenominal. The day after I cycled the route back, taking numerous pics & marvel over them now. A thoroughly reccomended ride. From Haines Jct I continued along the road heading to Alaska.
    I crossed into Alaska & time was pressing so at Tok I took the Anchorage road & got into town with a day to spare.
    I had a wonderful time, met some great people & saw some lovely views. I was new to cycle touring & still havn't a clue how, why or what most of the things on the bike do. I couldn't care less. I just went out there & put the most important travelers gadget into use - my head. I didn't ride accross continually or ever get the chance to ride the oil road to Prudhoe Bay but I enjoyed myself, couldn't of asked for more.

    For the people who offered help & advise a huge thank you, to the detractors, cometh the hour, cometh the man.

  14. #14
    Gordon P
    Guest
    Wow! Congratulations! That sounds like an incredible cycling trip! Hope you post some pictures.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Green Bay, WI
    My Bikes
    Kona Dr Dew, Lemond Le Alp, Mongoss NX-7, Trek T200 Tandem
    Posts
    487
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wow, that is crossing Canada the tough way. What a great sounding trip!

  16. #16
    Year-round cyclist
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Montréal (Québec)
    Posts
    3,023
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Nice to hear back from you.

    In Québec, I don't think the North Shore (Baie-Comeau to Tadoussac) is that bad for cycling, but many parts of the highway are in a not-so-good condition and there is no railroad to serve the territory. Distances are also just "long enough" to get sleepy drivers (not a good excuse, just an explanation). It also seems beyond "touring country" for most Québecers, so people don't expect cyclists along the road. You would have been on a nicer cycling road West of Tadoussac because there is either a paved shoulder or an alternate scenic route all the way to Québec city. Then train and motorways drain a lot of the motorised traffic.

    BTW, many people express similar concerns with the Trans-Canada highway in Ontario (highway 17)... which you avoided most of the way.

    Regarding highway "non-completions", I think Newfoundland and Labrador is almost as bad as Northern British Columbia. Québec used to be notoriously bad 40 years ago too.

    Regards,
    Michel Gagnon
    Montréal (Québec, Canada)

  17. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    24
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the reply Michel & a whole hearted thanks for the mails that you sent to me with ALL the information, it was not only helpfull but invaluble.

    Just to clarifty, the road from Baie Comeau to Tadoussac was a GOOD road & the shoulder if memory serves me correct was ok. It seemed, upon reflection that having been 'amongst the trees' for so long & with a heightened expectation of a town. that I was in a little bit of shock when I encountered so much traffic in Baie Comeau (a small town). That coupled with the dissapointment of my boxes not being at the Post Office just made a different mindset. The day just got worse in Forestville when a lady just pulled out of a side road infront of me & within 5 mins a taxi did a 'U Turn' to drop off a fair, again cutting me up. Thankfully for all conserned I restrained myself, just as I had my hand on his door handle. Seething dosent really sum up my mood ! At Portneuf I got a fantastic B & B & all was well with the day again.

    To be honest I cannot recall having to bad a roads whilst in Qc, Even the sections on the 389 were ok. I had to watch it on descents that I didn't go to fast & into a channel of loose gravel, made it entertaining when I did though !

    At the end of the day if you take on a northerly crossing, or wish to stay out of the Tourist areas, you have to be prepared for the gravel roads. Lets face it, there better than nothing. By now the road from Red Bay-Cartwright (Labrador) will be complete. Its a good road, it just didn't have its top coating of crushed stone. I had the added excitement of an 'unusual section', as I eluded to, it was a laugh, not only to myself but people who passed to.

    So once again, THANK YOU ever so much for your time & information, it made my ride easier.

    Reccon it might be Iceland next, probably after a winter trek in Labrador or a traverse of the Yukon territory, both on foot.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    206
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    THANK YOU! for the update. An incredible journey.
    lj

  19. #19
    Year-round cyclist
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Montréal (Québec)
    Posts
    3,023
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    MIck,

    I know you didn't ride that part, but how is the Trans-Labrador highway between Happy-Valley and Labrador City? Is it paved or in gravel?
    Michel Gagnon
    Montréal (Québec, Canada)

  20. #20
    Love Me....Love My Bike! aerobat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Winnipeg
    My Bikes
    Bikes: Giant hybrid, Trek 4500, Cannondale R800 Some commuting 20mi/day, mostly fitness riding - 20-50 mile rides
    Posts
    1,231
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the update, Mick, sounds like a fantastic trip! Post some pics!
    "...perhaps the world needs a little more Canada" - Jean Chretian, 2003.

  21. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    24
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Trans Labrador Highway

    The 510 from the community of Happy Valley/Goose Bay to Sheshatseits & North West River is a paved road & for some years now there has been a bridge over to North West River.
    The 500 (Trans Labrador Highway) from Happy Valley/Goose Bay to Labrador City is gravel. At the HV/GB end the first couple of miles is extensively used & pretty rutted but usually well maintained, as is the rest of the road really. Of course at times it needs maintaining & I believe its seen to & repaired quickly. Some locals prefer the road in winter with a snow covering. They say its faster.
    As you get to the Hydro Plant at Churchill Falls you come to a paved section & roads in Churchill Falls are paved, if memory serves me correct.
    The Esker Road is again gravel & the bridge that was washed out on the Simm River is now rebuilt so I'm told. All that remains at Esker are a few weekend cabins in an old camp area. The once (twice - as it returns) train a week (Sept Illes - Schefferville) would stop there if asked to/flagged down.
    There are NO facilities of any kind along the road other than at Churchill Falls (a Company Town servicing the Hydro Plant). There is a hotel (expensive) & a Lodge (Black Spruce) which is alot cheaper. In the community complex therse a supermarket, Post Office & Restaurant. There is also a shop (where you book into the Black Spruce Lodge) & petrol Station in the community. I have previously used the Post Office as a drop for a supply box.
    As you get to the junction near Warbush/Labrador City you again return to paved road. This continues around the towns & along to & through the Quebec border, to & crossed Fermont & along the 389 to Mont Wright (a mine), where the gravel returns. The road changes number from the border. In Quebec its the 389.
    The next pavement that you get is at Fire Lake, a closed mine. There is a pull off there for the Heavy Goods Vehicles. I'm unsure about how far this pavement streches for, think its 20 km or so, then reverts to gravel. Next up Gagngon, marked on lots of maps, even 2003 editions !!! Its a sad tale that I'm not fully conversant with but it was a company town & when the mine closed, the town was later raised to the ground. All that remain are the kerb stones, a central reservation & drains !!! There is a small paved section through the old community, after which it returns to gravel.
    Relais Gabriel (a Petrol Station/cafe/motel) is next, again when I was walking they kindly help a supply box for me. The foods good to !
    Next up is the Manic Cinq (5), the Daniel Johnson Dam, just after the dam you hit pavement & have pavement for 210 km to Baie Comeau. Its a twisting & turning route though. Just past the Hydro plant therse a Motel/Petrol Station/ Restaurant/Shop.
    The next place where there is a shop/cafe/fuel is around the 95km point. Just around the corner (Baie Comeau side) is a small motel doing rooms, FANTASTIC Place.
    There is also another shop/fuel/cafe/camping ground about 24 Km above manic Deux (2) In the cafe they do cheap rooms accross the road, used these a couple of times now.
    I know that the Tourist Office in Bea Comeau do a breakdown sheet of distances & road surface & estimated Driving Times, its worth getting. Mines not to hand but when I locate it I will place it along with this info.
    There are also some cabins at various places along the road & a couple of SOS stations along where the road crosses the railway lines. At 'Queen' therse a lobby that's warmed & at another (Forgot name) therse a bog (Toilet) also with a light & heater in there. Believe me its a welcome walming & rest stop !
    It might be a tad remote but there are people using the road. Usually every day the TSL Overland truck & Kingsbury (think thats the company name) travel the road. Contrary to belief the lads are helpful & when they know your on the road (you'll be on it quite a few days) they use their radios to let others know where you are etc.
    I like the area but it is not 'Everyones Cup of Tea'
    I drew some stick (read the winter cycling threads) but I know of a Japanese lad that has done this route in February. I believe he crossed from Vancouver & found himself up in that area at that time of year. He was successsful to, although it was cold, No, very cold.
    If a challenge, bordering on the insane, floats your boat (like it does me) its a good laugh.
    If anyones interested in cycling this route feel free to contact me. I've been up into this area a couple of times, cycling & walking.

    As for posting pics. I'm technicaly inept with a cycle & worse with a computer !

  22. #22
    Year-round cyclist
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Montréal (Québec)
    Posts
    3,023
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the update on conditions. I never cycled that route, but drove through to Manic 5 a few times and to Fermont twice, about 12-15 years ago. One time was in Summer (lots of bugs) and the other was in "mid-season" (October or March, something like that), which actually meant Winter over there.

    At that time, Gagnon was closed, but the houses had been only recently removed and traces of the village were still evident. When I have time, I'll retrace a website I have found on the history of that village. The road was also paved all the way from the mine 5 km South of Gagnon to another one about 100 km North of it. Very good pavement, but some places had lost it and it was evident that potholes, washouts and the like would not be repaved. So maybe they removed pavement on some of the worst sections.

    As for cycling, it's a bit too remote for my tastes, but it is definitely out of the question for quite a few years as I would never dream of cycling that road with two kids (7 and 3). They like a little bit more civilisation!

    Regards,
    Michel Gagnon
    Montréal (Québec, Canada)

  23. #23
    Member bicycle_girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Vancouver BC area
    My Bikes
    Trek 5200 2004, Trek 520 2003
    Posts
    48
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mick
    Has anyone had the oppertunity to cross Canada on a bicycle. I've the oppertunity next Spring & am starting in St Johns, Newfoundland, traversing the Trans Labrador Highway before heading down to the St Lawrence. From there its a who knows, other than staying as far north & out of the cities. Depending on how well I do, I might venture up to Alaska, aiming for Prudhoe Bay.
    Any advice ....... or a helpful psychiatrist, would be greatful.
    I am considering myself a quick journey from Vancouver to Montreal, possibly to Gaspe if time allows in 2004. I would probably stay south, but passing by Val D'or instead of Hwy 17. But who knows? We may even cross path. If you pass through Vancouver area, give me a call!
    Cheers. Kati

  24. #24
    Ride em all Gtscottie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    My Bikes
    Tandem,2 road bikes, 2 mtb
    Posts
    80
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    WOW if you end up in Alaska and plan on heading up to Prudhoe Bay remember that the road is wicked and that the snow comes on the north slope around the end of September and is quite often still there in June.

  25. #25
    extra-t Resident's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    The most biggest smoke-icus
    My Bikes
    Trek 520, Trek 5500, Cervelo Carbon Soloist
    Posts
    292
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mick
    As you get to the junction near Warbush/Labrador City you again return to paved road. This continues around the towns & along to & through the Quebec border, to & crossed Fermont & along the 389 to Mont Wright (a mine), where the gravel returns.
    I lived in Wabush for 18 years. Can't say that I'd go back though.
    Taking photos of your lovely planet...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •