Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-10-06, 07:29 PM   #1
bob51
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 13
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
8 versus 9 speed for touring

I was hoping to hear some opinions on 8 versus 9 speed for a touring bike. I am seriously considering having a touring bike built and the LBS has recommended that an 8 speed shifter is best. Their rational is that the thinner chain for a 9 speed is subject to stretching. I have never read about this concern. When I look at the trek 520 or the Cannondales I see that they are 9 speed.

Anyway I would be interested in hear some opinions. I am aiming to have a bike with a range of approx 20 to 100 gear inches and my feeling is that the additional increments in the lower range would be beneficial. The area that I ride has a lot of hills and unfortunaltely my knees are not getting any younger.

Thank for your opinions
bob51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-06, 08:29 PM   #2
halfspeed
Senior Member
 
halfspeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: SE Minnesota
Bikes: are better than yours.
Posts: 12,276
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Eight speed parts are much cheaper and slightly more durable. For the most part 8 and 9 speed components are interchangeable so if you need to make a field replacement at a shop that only has one or the other, you can get by.

The advantage of nine speed is that you can have your gearing a bit closer spaced which allows you to keep a more consistent cadence.

I run 8.
halfspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-06, 09:59 PM   #3
mtnroads
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Portland, Oregon and SE Asia
Bikes: Waterford ST-22, Jamis Quest Elite, Jamis Dragon Pro
Posts: 933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
All my bikes are 7-speed so 8 would be a luxury. I think 8-speed is a good compromise of strength and versatility, and with 24-36-48 in the front and a "P" cassette (12-32) in the back you are all set with 20 to 108 GI. That ought to cover all the bases and the gaps aren't too wide between gears.

Last edited by mtnroads; 03-10-06 at 10:12 PM.
mtnroads is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-06, 10:48 PM   #4
Matthew A Brown
this bike is an aqueduct
 
Matthew A Brown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Gainesville, FL
Bikes: Villin custom touring, Medici Pro Pista, KHS Alite1000, Windsor fixed commuter
Posts: 1,073
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
8 is fine. Just get a biggish cassette, at least up around a 30 if yr doing loaded stuff.
__________________
Villin custom touring | Raleigh XXIX | Medici Pro Pista | 1978 Schwinn Stingray
Matthew A Brown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-06, 11:59 PM   #5
EmmCeeBee
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: SW Washington, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 373
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It's unanimous.

9 and 10-speed use narrower components and are possibly not as rugged. But they're bling, so the new bikes use 'em. I wouldn't think "chain stretch" is any worse, but certainly the gears would wear faster; all around, 9-speed uses closer tolerances which would have a greater chance to go haywire in tough conditions.

7 and 8-speed are cheaper, still easy to get.

I tour on 6 and 7-speed. Tight gear ranges and single-step shifting aren't that important for touring; racers need 'em to keep up with the wheel in front of them. On tour, you just downshift to the best gear and enjoy the view. You want a good range, but the most important gears are the highest and lowest.

-- Mark
EmmCeeBee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-06, 12:20 AM   #6
roadfix
hello
 
roadfix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Bikes:
Posts: 18,565
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
My commuter and tourer are 7 & 8 speeds, respectively, and I love them and will continue to use them. My mtb's are 9 speed. But if I were to start from scratch building a new tourer with new components, I'll probably go 9 speed.....as I'm not too tough on equipment and they tend to last a long time, regardless. Some 9 speed components might be more expensive initially, but I don't wear them out frequently, therefore cost is not a factor when equipping a new tourer with 9 speed....

Last edited by roadfix; 03-11-06 at 10:19 AM.
roadfix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-06, 01:59 AM   #7
BigGuy
Touring senior
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Didsbury, Alberta, Canada - near Calgary
Bikes: Cannondale touring bike
Posts: 117
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Chains don't stretch -- they wear. I doubt a 9 speed would wear faster than an 8. (I have a 9 speed on a Cannondale touring bike - T800)
BigGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-06, 09:41 AM   #8
aroundoz
More Energy than Sense
 
aroundoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: 155 miles north of Spokane
Bikes: Thorn Sherpa, Co-Motion Custom Road, Salsa Fargo, Mercian King of Mercia and Motobecane Fantom Pro 29er
Posts: 710
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I get really tired of hearing from bike shops that 8 speed will soon be obsolete, cassettes hard to find..... We have been hearing that for years about 7 speed and they are still out there and easy to find.

I just like eight speed because for touring, I like bigger jumps between gears. Personal preference. I have heard the chain argument, that 8 speed chains are stronger, but like stated above, I doubt that's true. 8 speed chains and cassettes are definitely less expensive.
aroundoz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-06, 12:30 PM   #9
5 more
just 5 more miles
 
5 more's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Vancouver Island
Bikes:
Posts: 86
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I also use 8 speed on my Miyata. I made one cassett out of 3 to get the gearing I liked. Still experimenting with this. The whole set up has standed very well after 1500 km. Was thinking of STI shifters until the idea of being stuck in Nowhere, Canada with a broken STI and since I'm oldschool down tubes were the final choice. My philosophy is KISS (keep it simply stupid).
5 more is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-06, 02:11 PM   #10
onbike 1939
Senior Member
 
onbike 1939's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Fife Scotland
Bikes: Airnimal Chameleon; Ellis Briggs; Moulton TSR27 Moulton Esprit
Posts: 2,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 74 Post(s)
I've toured with 9 speed and for loaded touring found that the increments in gearing were too small to allow for the inertia caused by the weight of luggage. This meant changing two at a time up and down. As long as you have a good range i.e. for me with bad knees this means 17-95 inches, then 8 is fine.

Last edited by onbike 1939; 03-12-06 at 06:02 AM. Reason: error
onbike 1939 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-06, 02:50 AM   #11
rmwun54
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 898
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well if you go with 9 speed, get a 12-34 cassette and you'll have all the gears you need. When pulling weight, you want a good range of gears to allow for a comfortable cadence. I use a 12-32 8 speed on my tourer with a 52-38 double, and it work fine for me. Of course I am not into hauling exess weight either on a tour; lite is my motto.
rmwun54 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:35 AM.