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Old 03-19-06, 09:38 PM   #1
Blue Order
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Touring rigs: eyelets

I'm curious-- I've seen double eyelets as the "preferred" standard on touring bikes. Is there a reason double eyelets are preferred over single eyelets?
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Old 03-19-06, 10:05 PM   #2
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Simple; the double eyelets allow you to mount your fenders and racks seperately. If you have ever tried to install fenders and racks on a single eyelet, you would know that the double eyelets are a good thing.

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Old 03-19-06, 10:20 PM   #3
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See, I haven't tried that yet, but plan to, and am wondering if the double eyelets are "necessary" or not. What exactly is the problem with mounting both to a single eyelet. Only wondering because most bikes don't have double eyelets, and yet fenders and a rack are almost necessities for most bikes.
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Old 03-19-06, 11:19 PM   #4
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My own two cents: The bike market is driven by racing (or racing-inspired) bikes, which is too bad since most cyclists would do better with more practical machines.
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Old 03-19-06, 11:35 PM   #5
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or mount your fenders onto the uprights of your racks ...
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Old 03-19-06, 11:38 PM   #6
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It depends on your actual stuff. A lot of bikes have double eyelets on the rear, and they are useful for attaching your rack forward, and the rear fender behind the reasons for that are in descending order:

- If the fender was attached with the rack, it would block access to the place you put your pannier tie, depending on position and number of ties;
- Any time you attach the rack eyelets and the fender eyelets to the same bolt, there is a chance of everything coming loose if your fender eyelet is the usual bent piece of wire. it can simply spread apart. There are options to separate placement like washers, or my favorite, welding the wire to a solid piece of stainless so that it can be bolted on as hard as you want. Also, some fenders can be attached to eyelets on the rear of the rack.
- the dual eyelet position allows some flexibility for positioning the rack weight over the axle.

On the front, most racks need to be attached to the same lower single eyelet that comes on forks with only one eyelet, and you have to attach the fender there also, or to the rack if that will work. While the upper braze-on is not required for most racks or fenders, a braze-on higher on the fork is very useful, and it isn't likely to be provided on non-touring equipped bikes which would probably all have the second braze-on anyway.
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Old 03-19-06, 11:39 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Order
am wondering if the double eyelets are "necessary" or not. What exactly is the problem with mounting both to a single eyelet
They're not really needed but it sure makes things easier! If mounting both rack and fenders to one eyelet, try to mount the rack to the inside and the fenders on the outside (with a washer) to reduce the stress on the bolt. Be sure to use Loctite (blue)
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