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  1. #1
    Senior Member kamoke's Avatar
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    storing fuel bottles

    how do store your fuel bottle(s) when you're touring? I've seen some pictures where people place it in one of the bottle cages, though I could see it getting damaged more easily out there. Do you store your bottles with the pump attached, or do you remove it? If so, what do you do with your pump? has anyone that keeps their pump in the bottle experienced a broken pump?
    I'm just curious as to what people are up to.

    Another question related to fuel bottles. Is it really necessary to buy new bottles if your flying on a plane? Will cleaning them with soap and water be fine? anyone come across any problems there?

  2. #2
    Lentement mais sûrement Erick L's Avatar
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    Mine is in a pannier pocket, pump attached. Keeps some pressure in and no need to worry about losing the cap.
    Erick - www.borealphoto.com/velo

  3. #3
    Senior Member ken cummings's Avatar
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    Many purpose built loaded touring bikes have water bottle brake-ons under the down tube specifically for fuel bottles. A pump is built into my little stove.
    This space open

  4. #4
    Caffeinated. Camel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ken cummings
    Many purpose built loaded touring bikes have water bottle brake-ons under the down tube specifically for fuel bottles....
    That will be my method.

    As I've never toured with a multifuel stove (MSR XGK), I hadn't given much thought about the pump. I'll most likely use double zip locks on the pump, and keep it in a pannier.

    Hiking I used to keep the pump attached in an outside pocket. Different stove, similar setup.
    mmmm coffeee!

    email: jfoneg (_"a t symbol thing"_) yahoo (_"period or dot"_) com

  5. #5
    Sasquatch Crossing mycoatl's Avatar
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    I always remove the pump when I'm transporting my stove. I feel like there's more potential for leaks AND to stress the pump valves by keeping it attached. Anyone who's hiked or toured with an MSR bottle or similar will know that you'll build up large pressure differentials as you ascend and descend. Not sure if these actually stress the pump components, but I feel like the simple O-ring on the bottle top is more reliable and taking the pump out is an easy precaution.

    My method: remove pump, pump it a few times to remove fuel left in the lines, give it a shake, pack up the rest of the stove, and by then the fuel has evaporated so the pump goes into the bag with the stove which is stored inside a pot.

  6. #6
    Senior Member kamoke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mycoatl
    I always remove the pump when I'm transporting my stove. I feel like there's more potential for leaks AND to stress the pump valves by keeping it attached. .
    I have been unscrewing the pump after use to release the pressure and out of curiousity I opened it again (several days after use) and found that pressure had built just sitting in my house. Though it wasn't a lot of pressure I still agree that over time it could potentially put more stress on the pump then what is needed.

  7. #7
    VWVagabonds.com Losligato's Avatar
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    I'll be flying Southwest in May and their web site clearly states that if the stove is not brand new it is not permitted. I will be mailing my cleaned out stove to my desitnation.

    I flew Malaysian Air post 9-11 to Africa (out of New York no less) and the bag with the stove set off a the sniffer sensor. The TSA lady asked me what I had inside, she inspected, made sure there was no fuel and let it go.

    It's up to the airline in the end.

  8. #8
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    Cleaning bottles out with with denatured alcohol works to remove the "white gasoline" odor. SW Airlines forced me to toss my clean and dry, but used bottles, but allowed me to keep my stove -- for a backpacking trip, some years ago.

    But, we haven't bothered with cooking on a bike tour since 1984. It is not as hard as it might seem to go with out a stove. With grocery stores and bakeries, you can eat quite well without taking the time to cook -- basically, it's picnic lunch all day. And, you save that weight and space taken by the fuel & bottles, the pots. But, we're not addicted to coffee, either.

    Mike
    Mike Sakarias
    Juneau Alaska

  9. #9
    Flying and Riding sam21fire's Avatar
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    Wow, good stuff that I hadn't fully considered. I'm planning to buy new fuel bottles (the idea just kills me but I suppose it would happen either way) and pack them as I bought them, sales tags and all, never used. Think that will get by the sniffers and shakers?

    Sam

  10. #10
    Senior Member kamoke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sam21fire
    ... sniffers and shakers?
    what goes on back there after you drop your bag off? I have images of a big paint shaker..

    I hadn't even thought about the smell of fuel in the stoves. I was almost fine getting caught with the bottles and having to toss those, but the stove is a little more pricey.
    The problem with shipping the stove and bottle is that I don't have anyone in Vancouver anymore to ship things to. Anyone have any suggestions about that?

  11. #11
    Senior Member GeorgeBaby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamoke
    The problem with shipping the stove and bottle is that I don't have anyone in Vancouver anymore to ship things to. Anyone have any suggestions about that?
    If you will be staying at a hotel the first night, just ship it there, and ask them to hold it for your arrival. Alternatively, mail it to yourself via Poste Restante (General Delivery in American) in Vancouver.

  12. #12
    Caffeinated. Camel's Avatar
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    I've shipped fuel cannisters to myself (via UPS ground) for a hiking trip. I sent them to the Hostel where I was staying prior to starting my trek. I called them first to ask if it was allrite-they said it would be fine.

    -On another note, a fuel bottle will not fit in my outside downtube bottle cage (wheel/fender rub). I was hoping to put one there for my upcoming tour. I tried 2 sizes, and neither one works.

    I'll probably just try "McGyvering" a detacheable backpack pocket to use as an external pannier fuel bottle pocket. Or does anyone have a better idea? I don't want to carry liquid fuel insideany of my panniers.


    ...ohh and my Passport (with 2 Visas in it) is "stuck" at the wrong foreign agency in NY city.

    I'm scheduled to fly into Paris on tuesday, so any and all positive energy is welcome and most appreciated to get it back to me.

    Thanks!
    mmmm coffeee!

    email: jfoneg (_"a t symbol thing"_) yahoo (_"period or dot"_) com

  13. #13
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    on top of my normal (Not "Low Rider") front rack, bungie corded and secure!

  14. #14
    Senior Member kamoke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeBaby
    If you will be staying at a hotel the first night, just ship it there, and ask them to hold it for your arrival. Alternatively, mail it to yourself via Poste Restante (General Delivery in American) in Vancouver.
    Thanks for that bit of information. I googled it and found that in larger centers there are several post offices, so there is only one specific one for general delivery. The problem is that it is pretty far away from the airport, and I was hoping to spend as little time in Vancouver as possible. But I suppose it's just one of those things you have to do.

    This is the address for the general delivery location in vancouver: 349 W Georgia St, V6B 3P7
    "The post office will keep post-restante mail marked 'c/o General Delivery' for two weeks and then return it to sender."

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