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  1. #1
    1st Timer, be gentle... aubeONE's Avatar
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    Planning 2 day trip with buddy, tips?

    Hi,

    A friend and I are planning a 2 day trek and were wondering if there were any tips you guys and girls could offer for a first bike-over-night trip.

    We plan to pick a trail and ride it, basically to get lost, for one day, camp over night and pack up to ride back the next day.

    I need tips on what to bring, what kinda of food, tips and tricks as well as general things to think about planning-wise.

    Thanks,

    Evan.
    If at first you dont succeed, sky-diving probably isn't for you.

  2. #2
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    from my tour with some friends last weekend, I'd suggest you two work on your route and gear together. My tour was planned primarily by me because nobody else seemed to want to give much input. I warned of the high mountains and recommended training. Nobody trained, and were surprised how even a 600' climb was difficult. Another contributer was that a couple of them overpacked. I didn't overpack. I packed just about right, carried more weight than needed, but that was for the luxury of skipping nightly laundry. Seeing the difference between my gear and efforts on the climbs and the overpackers' I have gained an appreciation for lightweight touring.

    pack your bags, ride to your buddy's house and then unpack your bags together, see what he brought to do the same thing as something you brought. Or see something that you forgot. (I forgot a fork!)

    For a 1nighter you shouldn't need a whole lot. I like to cook, but I also mostly eat nuts and rice for dinner and it suits me fine for the short tours I go on. I eat oatmeal every morning, eat a hearty lunch, and eat a couple energy bars during the day.

    enjoy your tour, you'll have fun. Be prepared for the rock star treatment when you get back and tell people how far you rode. Non-cyclists think that 2 miles is far if you are on a bike. You'll have a great time.

  3. #3
    hello roadfix's Avatar
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    The one mistake I made on my very first single-night bikepacking trip was bringing my kitchen sink with me.
    .cinelli.olympic.surly.long.haul.trucker.kona.ku.surly.steamroller.
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  4. #4
    Macro Geek
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    This discussion of light-weight touring reminds me of my life before I did bike touring. I was a hitchhiker.

    At the start of my first major hitchhiking trip, my backpack weighed 65 pounds (30 kg). When I arrived home 10 months later, I had shed almost two-thirds of that weight. When I embarked on my second trip the next year, I carried only 18 pounds (8 kg). When I arrived in India, I basically dumped half the stuff out of my backpack.

    My incarnation as a hitchhiker taught me a great deal about the virtues of light weight travel, and as a result, I have never carried more than about 20 pounds (9 kg) on a bike tour. (This may not be realistic goal if you are camping, though.)

  5. #5
    1st Timer, be gentle... aubeONE's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tips and stories, I'm even more excited that before to head-out on our journey.

    What kind of tent, food, and extra clothing would you recommend bringing sticking to the guidelines of your experience with Light-Touring?

    Thanks again,

    Evan.
    If at first you dont succeed, sky-diving probably isn't for you.

  6. #6
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    Check your route for availability of shops to buy food on the way. If you can buy milk, bread and cheese at the points you want to stop and eat, it reduces the amount of stuff you have to carry. For a 1 nighter you dont need to cook, but an alcohol stove can do tea, coffee or soup. Dont plan on night time riding but a helmet mounted light is handy at the campsite. A knitted hat doesnt add much to your load, but will make a big difference if you have a cold night.

  7. #7
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    You mentioned "trail". Are you planning and offroad trip?

    If so, then, unless you are well familiar with the area, perhaps a good set of maps and compass (and the knowlege to use them) would be good to take. No sense becoming really lost.

    Perhaps determine a specific destination within a reasonable distance. Don't get too ambitious on your first trip. You can always take more as your experience grows.

  8. #8
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    Some great ideas on lightweight cooking equipment
    and
    tarp camping

    Check out the min night-time temperatures and dress accordingly.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Lolly Pop's Avatar
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    A balaclava's good for sleeping in. You lose a lot of heat from your head. I used one recently in Scotland and it made a big difference.

    I second the recommendation for a head-mounted light -- great in camp, and you can wear it to read at night!

    Have you considered your water supplies?

  10. #10
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    It all depends on the territory and availability of essentials or "bail-out" help. You can endure almost anything for two days but only if you have water and don't get 40mi from help with unrideable bikes. So if there is no bail-out possible; see to it that you know how much water that you will need and have tire, and chain repair needs met. Before you go anywhere, ride the loaded bike far enough to assess how well you have packed and how well your luggage handles the load. You will have a much better idea what to do after the first trip...have fun!

  11. #11
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW
    Some great ideas on lightweight cooking equipment
    and
    tarp camping

    Check out the min night-time temperatures and dress accordingly.
    Excellent web sites. As a tarp and alcohol stove user, I recommend both for bike touring.

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