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  1. #1
    Senior Member kf5nd's Avatar
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    Panniers or BoB Yak?

    I did some touring in my youth with panniers, worked OK, but it was hard on the rear wheel. I have a much lighter, faster recreational bike now, and I sure as shootin' don't want to load it up with panniers; it's a Specialized Sequoia, I don't think it's really even made to accept a rear rack, I can't see any eyelets on the frame and rear dropouts, and I don't want to wrap clamps around the carbon seatstays... and I really don't want to buy another bike for that occasional tour.

    Should I consider a BoB Yak trailer? I think it would be useful, I would for sure use it to get groceries and do other shopping.

    What are the pluses and minuses compared to panniers? And this is solely for road use, BTW. Thanks.
    Peter Wang, LCI
    Houston, TX USA

  2. #2
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
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    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  3. #3
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kf5nd
    I did some touring in my youth with panniers, worked OK, but it was hard on the rear wheel. I have a much lighter, faster recreational bike now, and I sure as shootin' don't want to load it up with panniers; it's a Specialized Sequoia, I don't think it's really even made to accept a rear rack, I can't see any eyelets on the frame and rear dropouts, and I don't want to wrap clamps around the carbon seatstays... and I really don't want to buy another bike for that occasional tour.

    Should I consider a BoB Yak trailer? I think it would be useful, I would for sure use it to get groceries and do other shopping.

    What are the pluses and minuses compared to panniers? And this is solely for road use, BTW. Thanks.
    You might want to rethink using the Sequoia for any kind of touring duty. Trailers put a significant amount of stress on the bike frame. Eventhough the trailer is attached to the bike through the axel of the rear wheel, it still puts a lot of force on the rear triangle as you go down the road and as you corner. You might want to borrow trailer to try first and you might want to see what Specialized has to say too.

    Personally, I don't trust anything made of carbon.
    Stuart Black
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  4. #4
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    Check out the Burley Nomad, it is much less stressful on the bike than the BOB is. Still though, I'd be nervous with carbon stays....

  5. #5
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    I'm pretty sure the Sequoia has rack mounting eyelets at the top of the seat-tube. It even has fork low-rider mounts. Check the website and compare to your model.
    It is designed as a light tourer and should be capable of hauling a hostelling (or ultralight camping) load for a week or 2. It is not suitable for normal camping loads or extended touring .
    The light touring bike is a really useful style capabale of doing most things but it is very rare for major manufacturers to get it right.

  6. #6
    rained out
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    I have an 05 Sequoia Elite, and it definitely has the rack eyelets that MichaelW describes, both front and rear. I have a light-duty rear rack and small panniers on it for day trips.
    I keep moving to be stable

  7. #7
    Senior Member kf5nd's Avatar
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    What Specialized Says

    Peter,

    I would not use a trailer with the carbon rear end. It would put a load on the frame that it wasn't designed for.

    thanks,
    Specialized Customer Support



    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute
    You might want to rethink using the Sequoia for any kind of touring duty. Trailers put a significant amount of stress on the bike frame. Eventhough the trailer is attached to the bike through the axel of the rear wheel, it still puts a lot of force on the rear triangle as you go down the road and as you corner. You might want to borrow trailer to try first and you might want to see what Specialized has to say too.

    Personally, I don't trust anything made of carbon.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by staple
    I have an 05 Sequoia Elite, and it definitely has the rack eyelets that MichaelW describes, both front and rear. I have a light-duty rear rack and small panniers on it for day trips.
    I've done 2 tours on my Sequoia Elite. This last time with about 40lbs mostly on the rear rack. Thing handled a little squirrly, but after the first day I got used to it. I have a performance brand rear rack, nashbar panniers. You can probably guess from those two things that i'm cheap and therefor most of my stuff is heavier than it needs to be. I've also got a very small handlebar bag (Topeak one that converts to a fanny pack.....I don't use the fanny pack feature)

    anyway, the bike performed great. I'm really impressed with the wheels. I was a little nervous about having less than 36 spokes on tour, but I've had the bike on 2 short camping tours and countless commuting days (with laptop, clothes and lunch) in the last 1.5yrs and the wheels are still true. I've only broken one front spoke. I weigh about 180lbs.

    I've got 700x25 armadillos on it, and the road planet bike fenders fit, barely. This is a light touring bike, I don't know that I'd take it cross country, but for the commute and the 4 day tours I've been doing it's just about perfect for me.

    What helped with stability this tour was the addidtion of a couple pounds in the handlebar bag, and I tried to pack the heaviest stuff towards the front of my rack. My tent especially. I made sure to put it on the rack in front of the rear axel. I also put heavy stuff low in the bags. I think I could do a weeklong tour with the same setup, and maybe longer with a few gear adjustments.

    MichaelW - There are eyelets on the forks, I've got my fenders mounted there...but what kind of rack and how would you mount it to the front? I've thought about getting a steel fork with mid-fork mounts for a rack if I were going on a long tour and needed front bags, but if I can get them on this bike, I wouldn't need a new fork!

  9. #9
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    I find touring with a trailer (Burley Nomad in my case) easier going than touring with heavy panniers on the back only. With heavy panniers I find the bike harder to control and it just feels "funny". The problem would probably be greatly lessened if I had a front rack and panniers as well mind you - I have never tried that.

    I have a Trek 7100FX so can't comment on how your bike would take to either.

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