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  1. #1
    Slow Rider bwgride's Avatar
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    Simple Maintenance Components

    I plan to assemble a touring bike, and I am currently considering components. With this in mind, I would like to buy and use only those components that minimize use of special or heavy tools. For example, threadless headsets can be adjusted with allen wrenches while threaded require large wrenches, so in regards of minimizing needed tools to carry while on tour, the threadless headset is more convenient.

    Can you add to this list components (make/models) that can be serviced with simple tools? Here's a short list:

    1. Threadless headset requires allen wrench (vs. larger wrenches for threaded)
    2. Self-extracting bolts for crank arms eliminates need for crank arm extractor

    Any other components that minimize needed tools when compared against older or traditional component designs?
    Last edited by bwgride; 05-05-06 at 08:32 AM.

  2. #2
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    Does a Phil Woods hub dissasemble using allen keys?

  3. #3
    VWVagabonds.com Losligato's Avatar
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    I though I had a good solution for the cassette removal but I broke the Stien Tool. Yikes!
    www.VWVagabonds.com
    Mexico, Central America, South America & Africa in a Volkswagen

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  4. #4
    hello roadfix's Avatar
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    Allen keyed pedal spindle so you don't have to lug a pedal wrench.
    .cinelli.olympic.surly.long.haul.trucker.kona.ku.surly.steamroller.
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    hello roadfix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Losligato
    I though I had a good solution for the cassette removal but I broke the Stien Tool. Yikes!
    My suspision is that you had the cassette lockring on too tight to begin with. No need to torque down that lockring.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member 58Kogswell's Avatar
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    Not positive this qualifies in terms of tools but if you get V-brakes instead of cantis you will have a much easier time of installation and adjustment. Is that the kind of thing you are asking about?

    With V-brakes and drop bars you pretty much have to use the Dia Comp 287-V brake levers which means you can't use any STI / Ergo levers which means you can't be faced with the frustration of broken brifters - which sometimes can't be fixed with any tools. You will have to run either downtube shifters, bar-ends or bar-end shifters mounted on Paul's Thumbies and all of those possibilities are less likely to break and easier to fix if it does than STI / Ergo levers.

    If your point is to Keep It Simple (and simple to repair) I am in agreement with that and I believe there are a number of ways, just as you are suggesting, to do so. Wrenching can be fun but not on tour without the proper tools and replacement parts.

    Last thought - SRAM chains with the magic link or power link or whatever they call it are about the easiest chain change / fix / repair I can imagine.

    I use flat, tough MKS platform / touring pedals which means no SPD springs and mechanisms on the pedals or the cleats to break but I realize I am in the extreme minority there. Nothing to fix because there is almost nothing to break and any bike shop will have a cheap replacement.

  7. #7
    Slow Rider bwgride's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 58Kogswell
    Not positive this qualifies in terms of tools but if you get V-brakes instead of cantis you will have a much easier time of installation and adjustment. Is that the kind of thing you are asking about?
    Yes, thanks.


    Quote Originally Posted by 58Kogswell
    bar-end shifters mounted on Paul's Thumbies and all of those possibilities are less likely to break and easier to fix if it does than STI / Ergo levers.
    I use bar-end shifters mounted on Pauls thumbies and also older thumb shifters from Shimano on each of my four bikes. I think Shimano and other companies are missing a market by not reintroducing thumb shifters.


    Quote Originally Posted by 58Kogswell
    Last thought - SRAM chains with the magic link or power link or whatever they call it are about the easiest chain change / fix / repair I can imagine.

    I use flat, tough MKS platform / touring pedals which means no SPD springs and mechanisms on the pedals or the cleats to break but I realize I am in the extreme minority there. Nothing to fix because there is almost nothing to break and any bike shop will have a cheap replacement.
    I also use simple platform peddles (Wellgo makes many and good quality, but I currently use Nashbar's $25 land crusier platform pedals). I prefer to bike in regular shoes/sandals and platform pedals are the way to go with tennis shoes.

  8. #8
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    Headset wise you can use a wrench to set the threaded type before you leave, if it ever loosens, you can retighten by hand, it loosens up again, and you adjust it by hand it is good for 100 miles or so, you can even do it while moving. I use the threadless style for other reasons, but as a repair item it wouldn't be on my list.

    Phill hubs do just use allen keys for disassembly, and in addition the cassete bearings and the hardened axels are so bulletproof you probably won't need to deal with them. Same goes with, phil BB, and Chris King headset. Apparently some models of phil can be set up with just one spoke size for front and back hubs.

    The other obvious point is that one tool you can use for many things is no burden. If a particular part needs a wrench you will be carrying anyway... The reverse is that some parts use the wrench you will be carrying anyway, but actually need a much heavier version than you will likely carry. Your 15mm cone wrench probably won't remove your pedals, and the little 8 mm wrench in a pen knife key set won't take the click out of you crank arm, even with a go-bar.

    I use standard road pedals, like from the old days, and I attached a very thin layer of SS over them, bent front and back and attached into the toeclip holes. The result is platform pedal comfort without a lot of weight and with good serviceable bearings.

    Without going to heroic lengths, I think one sometimes has to look outside of the regular tool supply chain. Tools tend to fall into 2 categories, so small, nasty and weak they don't work, or the bike shop grade, but the size of a boat anchor. I think that making one's own tools can create certain tools at a better weight strength ballance.

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