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Old 06-18-06, 10:16 PM   #1
Gnarboots
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Touring Sans Panniers

I'm thinking about embarking upon a San Diego - San Francisco (and back?) solo trip next week. I don't have a touring bike so I'd be riding my beloved Cinelli SC which is not equipped with rack braze-ons. I've done 80-mile rides with my messenger bag crammed with junk before and, well, it's possible but rather uncomfortable. Any suggestions on alternative means of hauling gear? I'm just considering a small, comfortable internal frame pack (I travel super-light). Are there racks made for racing frames?
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Old 06-18-06, 10:19 PM   #2
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If you can get your gear to 20lbs or so there are a number of rear racks that attach at the seatpost. You could combine that with a small backpack and carry quite a load.

Old Man Mountain sells rear racks that would attach at the QR and then you could use small panniers.

You could also use a trailer such as a Bob, but if you are going ultra light that might be overkill.

I was thinking of using the seatpost rack to do some ultralight touring between hostels on my R600, but that trip hasn't materialized yet - should work though if you keep the weight down.

Have fun.
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Old 06-18-06, 10:42 PM   #3
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If you are using a Brooks saddle you might want to try a saddle bag like the ones listed here:
http://www.rivbike.com/webalog/baggage_racks/ or here: http://www.wallbike.com/berthoud/berthoudbags.htm. I tried them once and liked them but one thing you have to get used to use your hamstrings touching the bags. At least that was the case on the one I tried. I did a one day overnight tour using my camelback and worked well even w/ a pair of teva's inside so your small pack would probably be OK. Assuming you will be credit card touring?
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Old 06-18-06, 11:07 PM   #4
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Most 'universal' racks that I have seen come with p-clips for mounting if you don't have the brazed on mounts. I used the p-clips from mine to fix a bike rack for my daughter's friend.
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Old 06-19-06, 03:11 AM   #5
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You can attach Carradice style saddlebags with a small clamp/rack that fits to the saddle raisl or the seatpost. This moves the bag away from the back of your thighs and permits attatchment to saddles without Brooks style bag loops.
Saddlebags are have the best load/weight ratio for carrying small touring loads of about 20l. You can combine them with bar bags for extra space.
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Old 06-19-06, 11:31 AM   #6
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I've seen plenty of people touring on race bikes with seatpost racks. Some with larger panniers than mine. One problem for a friend of mine that used one was that the geometry of the frame (short chainstays) made the load sit rear of the rear axle, which made the front end very light. He wasn't ultra-light (we were camping and cooking) so it might not be a problem for you. You could aslo get a handlebar bag and put a few pounds in there, it'd help a little and also bar bags are nice for snacks and valuables. I keep all my valuables in my bar bag and take it with me when i'm off the bike.
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Old 06-19-06, 02:14 PM   #7
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You can get some pretty nice sized trunk racks and put them on a rack that attaches to the seatpost. Check out Nashbar. Just remember, you really need to keep it light. Combine that with a handlebar bag and perhaps a camelback with a pouch and you can ultralight tour, particularly if you are staying in hotels. This would give you room for a couple of days of clothes, snacks, camera, etc.

Keep the load light.
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Old 06-19-06, 03:09 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aroundoz
If you are using a Brooks saddle you might want to try a saddle bag like the ones listed here:
http://www.rivbike.com/webalog/baggage_racks/ or here: http://www.wallbike.com/berthoud/berthoudbags.htm. I tried them once and liked them but one thing you have to get used to use your hamstrings touching the bags.
In 1956 I did my first tour with a saddlebag something like the wallbike one. It had a QR skewer for attaching it to the straps on the back of the saddle. I dont remember it hitting the backs of my thighs, but wallbike offers a support frame to keep theirs back.
An internal frame pack is also a good idea if it doesnt interfere with your ability to carry water. A handlebar bag is good for snacks, wallet and camera.
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Old 06-19-06, 03:20 PM   #9
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There is a good recent pic on the loaded touring bikes thread with a guy with a little rack in the rear holding a small pack (the topeak fold-out one) mounted to his seatpost, and a bar bag.
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Old 06-22-06, 06:39 AM   #10
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What about a good handlbar bag? And I'm usprised no has mentioned using a trailer: http://www.burley.com/products/trail...ml?p=Nomad&i=5
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Old 06-22-06, 08:32 AM   #11
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I have a Tubus Fly rack that I mount onto the QR and rear brake pivot nut on my Lemond. Very slick set-up, compact and strong. Rated for 40 lbs. Lightweight too, about 350 grams. Wayne at the http://www.thetouringstore.com/ gives advise and sells them along with the QR adapter. Contact him for help.

See: http://www.thetouringstore.com/TUBUS/Fly/FLY%20PAGE.htm
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Old 06-22-06, 09:00 AM   #12
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Henry Kingman had an article in an old Rivendell Reader describing superlight saddlebag touring, where everything was carried in a saddlebag, a handlebar bag or lashed to his drop bars. It isn't online, which is too bad because it is an alternative to panniers.

Here is a picture of his set up. He does have a bag support to hold up the rather large saddlebag he is using.

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Old 06-22-06, 09:03 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bccycleguy
I have a Tubus Fly rack that I mount onto the QR and rear brake pivot nut on my Lemond. Very slick set-up, compact and strong. Rated for 40 lbs. Lightweight too, about 350 grams. Wayne at the http://www.thetouringstore.com/ gives advise and sells them along with the QR adapter. Contact him for help.

See: http://www.thetouringstore.com/TUBUS/Fly/FLY%20PAGE.htm
I just mounted the Fly on my LeMond for Brevets. Worked well, and I can carry panniers if I want.
I'm modifying the Ortlieb rack bag mounting hardware to use on the Tubus Fly.





I love the Ortlieb stuff. Waterproof, very well made. I have panniers, a handlebar bag, a seat bag (large), and the bike box.



The large seat pack works really well for long day trips. It might be big enough for your light tour combined with a handlebar bag.
I've used in on my 200k and 300k brevet. Wish I had it on the 400k (I used a single pannier instead)

This is the small one: (too small, IMHO) the large one is big enough for my tools, digicam, food, jacket, extra gloves, and a few other small items if I can cram em in!

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Old 06-23-06, 12:42 AM   #14
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i would never do it, i don't think, but the founder of Clif Bars has an 8 pound touring kit he packs into a supersized under the seat bag.... it was outlined in an Outside magazine a few years ago....

something like extra jersey, microfit jacket, nylon off the bike pants, lil' hat, extra socks, patchkit, minitool and a credit card were pretty much it i think.

i go light, still manage to pack a full five bag load - but lightly.

If you can grovel, sleep in ditches, or have previous experience dirtbagging it, you'll do better on the road going ultralight. learning how to identify a warm patch of shrubbery is key.
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Old 06-23-06, 02:05 PM   #15
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If you are in to do it yourself projects, I just completed at 2500 mile tour with custom build panniers made out of mop buckets on a road bike (didn't have any rack mounts). The mop buckets can be bought at a place like Lowes or Home Depot for $15-20.

The first picture is just of the rear bucket. The only things you had to do it is melt the plastic a little to create a grove for where the frame mets the bike (I can't think of the technical name of those bars...) and drill a couple holes to create extre support (you can see the metel bar that I added in the first picture).

The second picture shows both the bikes (the first week and 550 miles I did with my dad, the other 2000 miles I did solo), only my bike (the blue GT) has the front bucket.
The front bucket is also a mop bucket, it required a little more tweeking.



Note: I would only recommend this to people who feel fairly comfortable messing around with stuff. Of course the buckets are so cheap, it doesn't really matter what you do with them. (I flew from Denver, CO to my home in Connecticut at the end of my trip, and I just threw out my "panniers")

I didn't have really any trouble from them, just a little tweeking here and there.
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