Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-22-06, 12:26 PM   #1
sanlevrier
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 99
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Touring with aero bars???...

I toured with a guy once who had aero bars on his bike....said it added to the range of positions and he found it rather comfortable....i would like to hear from anyone that has used them regarding comfort, bike handling etc..thanks a bunch...
sanlevrier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-06, 12:55 PM   #2
bobbotron
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 195
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanlevrier
I toured with a guy once who had aero bars on his bike....said it added to the range of positions and he found it rather comfortable....i would like to hear from anyone that has used them regarding comfort, bike handling etc..thanks a bunch...
I bet it would. They're handy things, aerobars are. Just don't use them if you expect to have to make any quick manuvers or have to brake suddenly.
bobbotron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-06, 01:07 PM   #3
spinnaker
Every day a winding road
 
spinnaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Bikes: 2005 Cannondale SR500, 2008 Trek 7.3 FX, Jamis Aurora
Posts: 4,699
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 331 Post(s)
I guess handle bar bags are out of the question when you add these things?

They do look very comfortable
spinnaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-06, 04:03 PM   #4
CC Rider
Crossfit
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Kenosha, Wi
Bikes: '05 Trek 520, Specialized Rockhopper, Litespeed Arenberg, Hurricane Force 4 Tri-bike
Posts: 57
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I used an old set of Scott RCO aerobars attached to a flat Mtn. bar for a tour last year and found them to be very comfortable and nice for a change of position. If properly fitted, the aerobars will place you into a more aero position while at the same time supporting your upper body weight "skeletally" rather than "muscularly", offering you faster miles for less energy expenditure. I didn't find that bike handling was effected significantly, but I would recommend against using them in town or anywhere else you might have to stop or turn often. If you're seriously considering a set of aerobars, I would look for a set like the Scott RCO's or some Profile models that have flip up arm rests which still allow you access to the flats on drop bars.
Happy Touring,
CC Rider
CC Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-06, 06:26 PM   #5
ncscott
cyclist
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: vermont
Bikes: road bike, mountain bike, touring bike
Posts: 332
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
"I guess handle bar bags are out of the question when you add these things?"

There was a post within the last 6 mo ?? about using both. There are quite a few people who figured out how to do it.
ncscott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-06, 09:56 PM   #6
edtrek
RPM: 85. MPH: varies.
 
edtrek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 312
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncscott
"I guess handle bar bags are out of the question when you add these things?"
I've recently ridden Pittsburgh-DC in 4 days / 357 miles, and we all used aero bars on our bikes. We all noted a remarkable improvement in our hand conditions vs previous rides without the aero bars. There are caveats - no close proximity to other bikes, no pacelines, not for rough spots/mud - but used in their place, they're ok.

I replaced my handlebar bag with a tri-athlete bag, a mesh thing that hangs down between the aero bards. There's two pockets, a tall skinny one for my GPS, and a smaller boxy one for my camera/cellphone. Everything else went into my trunk bag, and I added two Bento Boxes for the snacks I wanted to have available.



This link : http://www.thirdwave-websites.com/bike/trek830.cfm
has a few more pictures of the bike with the aero bars on it.
edtrek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-06, 10:26 PM   #7
Michel Gagnon
Year-round cyclist
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Montréal (Québec)
Bikes:
Posts: 3,023
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I guess aero bars are also out of the question as I captain a tandem which is towing a Piccolo trailercycle.

When the situation is calm, I sometimes rest my hands by keeping one hand as usual on the drops, and resting my other forearm on the handlebar. Usually 1 minute is all one needs to rest one's fingers.
Michel Gagnon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-06, 08:56 AM   #8
will dehne
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: rockford, il
Bikes: Trek 7700, C'dale R2000
Posts: 2,646
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanlevrier
I toured with a guy once who had aero bars on his bike....said it added to the range of positions and he found it rather comfortable....i would like to hear from anyone that has used them regarding comfort, bike handling etc..thanks a bunch...
I toured across America using Aero Bars in May 2006. Here are some observations.
Pro:
Going all day against a strong headwind is much more acceptable.
Catching up with a group you fell behind is more doable.
Takes the weight off the saddle.
Takes weight off your hands, wrists.
Aero Bar position can be comfortable if saddle and bars are adjusted for it.
Same effort, speed is up perhaps 5-10% compared to hands on the bars. (not so much on the drops)
Con:
No good at all in traffic, cross winds, very fast downhill, pace lines, any situation requiring fast stopping.
Need to learn steering with elbows. (takes a while)
Changing gears is more of an issue.
BTW, I had no trouble mounting a bag up front, under the Aero Bars.
will dehne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-06, 08:06 PM   #9
DSchlichting
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 342
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
When I built my Spectrum touring bike, I was not going to part with my beloved Kirtland handlebar bag, so I have a set of Profile Split Second bars mounted right alongside the handlebar bag --just enough clearance to get the bag on and off.
This gives a bit wider spread than normal aerobars, but the benefit is still there.
My particular set up does basically eliminate the top of handlebar riding position. To reduce this as an issue, you might consider a slightly (1-2cm?) wider handlebar to give more room on the tops --assuming that extra width does not cause a probem for you when riding the hoods/drops.
DSchlichting is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-06, 07:58 AM   #10
sanlevrier
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 99
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Another question to those that have toured with them....any specific ones to try and any ideas where to get them?
sanlevrier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-06, 08:17 AM   #11
WestOz
eccentric tourer
 
WestOz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Western Australia
Bikes: Giants, Randonneur
Posts: 56
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncscott
"I guess handle bar bags are out of the question when you add these things?"
If the fork neck is long enough, fit two head stems, with the lower one upside down, and cut a piece of old handlebars to put in the lower one, and attach the handlebar bag to this one. There is enough room to pull the bag up to disengage it from it's clip.
WestOz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-06, 12:49 PM   #12
acantor
Macro Geek
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Bikes: True North tourer (www.truenorthcycles.com), 2004; Miyata 1000, 1985
Posts: 1,248
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
I have used aero bars on every tour and day-trip since 1994. For me, they are indispensable. The extra riding positions add substantially to my comfort, endurance, and enjoyment.

I have the Profile Design Air Strykes, which have spring-loaded arm rests.
acantor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-06, 09:19 PM   #13
will dehne
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: rockford, il
Bikes: Trek 7700, C'dale R2000
Posts: 2,646
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanlevrier
Another question to those that have toured with them....any specific ones to try and any ideas where to get them?
I purchased Profile Airstryke from one LBS and Aerolite from another LBS.
The type with the flip up armrest is not so good IMHO. These things rattle on any rough road. Yes, they provide hand clearance, but the rattle kills it. Also, there is a very small pin in the pivot of that armrest. I managed to break it. I am a big guy and the LBS did not honor the warranty. So, I went to another LBS and got the Aerolite.
I am satisfied with that one. Lots of adjustments and no rattle. But also no room for hands on the bars. Life is compromise.
will dehne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-06, 03:28 AM   #14
outashape
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Michigan
Bikes:
Posts: 783
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Will, my pin broke on my Profile Airstryke aerobars a couple of years ago. Profile mailed me the replacement pin no charge.
outashape is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-06, 01:24 PM   #15
will dehne
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: rockford, il
Bikes: Trek 7700, C'dale R2000
Posts: 2,646
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by outashape
Will, my pin broke on my Profile Airstryke aerobars a couple of years ago. Profile mailed me the replacement pin no charge.
The bracket broke at the pin location. It is Die Cast Aluminum. Yes, I could have contacted the manufacturer but I was NOT satisfied with the rattle also. So, I tried to get an exchange or at least consideration. The LBS decided to be noncooperative. They lost a customer, permanently.
will dehne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-06, 01:57 PM   #16
gnz
Being there, doing that
 
gnz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Bikes: Avanti Pioneer Hybrid
Posts: 139
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've recently finished a two month tour of Mexico with aerobars on the bike.

They weren't very useful for riding position since the road was mostly narrow and in fair condition, I had to be ready for quick manouvers and the aerobar position makes that tricky.

The bar was very useful for mounting my gps though, as you can see in this picture.
gnz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-06, 06:13 PM   #17
lighthorse@eart
Florida to Oregon in 2007
 
lighthorse@eart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Florida
Bikes: LeMond Buenos Aires, Trek 7500, Scattante CFR, Burley Hudson
Posts: 138
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have aero bars on every bike I own. More positions, and for touring it is a comfortable way to reduce the wind resistance when slogging into a headwind all day. The bars do present a challenge for handle bar bags but I believe that the tradeoff is worth it.
lighthorse@eart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-06, 09:50 PM   #18
n4zou
Scott
 
n4zou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Bikes: Too Many
Posts: 2,393
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here's my old Trek Touring bike with Profile Aero bars. I used an MTB stem to get them higher than normal for a little more comfort. Note the large blowout bag mounted on them. It was a sweet setup.
That bicycle got trampled and destroyed by an out of control mule with a rider on it's back. I barely survived the incident as well and it took me three months to get over the damage inflicted to me.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg aerotrek.jpg (59.5 KB, 84 views)
n4zou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-06, 09:17 AM   #19
MMACH 5
Cycle Dallas
 
MMACH 5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Land of Gar, TX
Bikes: Lucinda--2010 Jamis Aurora Elite & a few others
Posts: 3,618
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Pick up a set of clip-ons from ebay. If you don't like them, turn around and sell them again. The re-sale value is pretty constant. If you aren't used to an extreme tuck, set them a little higher for now.

I love mine. I probably only spend five minutes at a time hunkered down on them, but the extra position is good for breaking up the ride and taking weight off my hands.
MMACH 5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-06, 10:22 AM   #20
acantor
Macro Geek
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Bikes: True North tourer (www.truenorthcycles.com), 2004; Miyata 1000, 1985
Posts: 1,248
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by outashape
...pin broke on my Profile Airstryke aerobars a couple of years ago. Profile mailed me the replacement pin no charge.
I had a similar experience. The pins on mine worked themselves loose, and as a result one of the assemblies broke. But I reported the problem to Profile, and they sent me replacement parts immediately. What good customer service!

When I bought these aerobars in 2004, the pin was held in place by friction alone ("interference fit"). The pin and assembly must have been redesigned, because the replacement pins were cotter pins, which don't loosen up.
acantor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-06, 02:19 PM   #21
onbike 1939
Senior Member
 
onbike 1939's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Fife Scotland
Bikes: Airnimal Chameleon; Ellis Briggs; Moulton TSR27 Moulton Esprit
Posts: 2,022
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 100 Post(s)
Keep in mind that my information is that aerobars were first invented for touring a long time back in California. It was only later that they were adopted for time-trialing.
onbike 1939 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-06, 10:26 AM   #22
Matthew A Brown
this bike is an aqueduct
 
Matthew A Brown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Gainesville, FL
Bikes: Villin custom touring, Medici Pro Pista, KHS Alite1000, Windsor fixed commuter
Posts: 1,073
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think my aerobars saved I don't know how many nerves in my hands. I can't imagine any kind of distances without them.

Handlebar bags are absolutely possible. At least, they're possible with the Syntace C2s + the 1" risers:



Plus it gives you the hella-high hand position with hella padding. Very nice.
__________________
Villin custom touring | Raleigh XXIX | Medici Pro Pista | 1978 Schwinn Stingray
Matthew A Brown is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:56 AM.