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Old 07-25-06, 12:45 PM   #1
racpat_rtw
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bungee cords

What do you use to tie your gear on the rear rack? I have always used common bungee cords, they work fine but it seems they are not realy made for bikes. The hooks are too large and heavy. Has anyone seen something better?
Thanks,
Patrick
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Old 07-25-06, 01:54 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by racpat_rtw
What do you use to tie your gear on the rear rack? I have always used common bungee cords, they work fine but it seems they are not realy made for bikes. The hooks are too large and heavy. Has anyone seen something better?
Thanks,
Patrick
Use a ball bungee like this You will need 4 for each bike. I loop them over the rack and then thread the bungee from opposite corners under each other. It's very stable and far better than the hooks on regular bungees. There far less chance of cutting through the outer bags of tents, etc.
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Old 07-25-06, 04:13 PM   #3
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Long ago I abandoned bungee cords for holding rack top gear after breakage and gear loss. Maybe modern ones are better but I have been using neoprene crampon straps from REI with great success. The rubber surface grips stuff sacks,poles and most anything else. I only had to replace one after leaving it at a campsite on one tour. Very durable and flexible for any load on and off road for touring.
Just another road tested alternative to bungee cords.
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Old 07-25-06, 04:32 PM   #4
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Hey I use those too!

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute
Use a ball bungee like this You will need 4 for each bike. I loop them over the rack and then thread the bungee from opposite corners under each other. It's very stable and far better than the hooks on regular bungees. There far less chance of cutting through the outer bags of tents, etc.
Great minds think alike. I use those on my rack too!
Jeni
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Old 07-26-06, 07:59 AM   #5
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Delta Cargo Net

I've been using the Delta Cargo Net, which is like $8 at REI. I found it pretty flexible, and you can easily jam things under it like a rain jacket or gatorade bottle without worrying about them coming free.

http://www.rei.com/online/store/Prod...ory_rn=4500850
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Old 07-26-06, 03:36 PM   #6
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I use compression straps from REI. Much easier than bungees.
They can also be used as a belt when the button breaks on your one pair of non-bike shorts. b
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Old 07-30-06, 08:24 PM   #7
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+1 on nylon compression straps w/fastex buckles. can buy as a unit or as separate parts. bungees suck.
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Old 07-30-06, 10:04 PM   #8
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Bungee cords eventually end up in the wheel. Also, many have experienced eye and hand injuries with them. Use compression straps.
Jim
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Old 07-31-06, 12:09 PM   #9
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Yeah, funny thing with those bungees, according to the label you should always wear safety glasses while using them..........
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Old 08-01-06, 07:11 PM   #10
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I am looking for compression straps at the REI Web site.
All I find is compression sacks. ?
I also did not see any in Performance Bike or Nashbar.

Thanks for your help
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Old 08-01-06, 09:17 PM   #11
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http://www.rei.com/online/store/Sear...PS&cat=4500001

It's the webbing straps with buckle.

Your local camping store might have them with all the other Coghlan's gizmos.
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Old 08-01-06, 09:18 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cruzMOKS
I am looking for compression straps at the REI Web site.
All I find is compression sacks. ?
The query http://www.rei.com/online/store/Search?query=strap returns a couple dozen straps
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Old 08-01-06, 11:25 PM   #13
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Y'all beat me to it with the links. I had an eye injury from a bungee.... luckily it was minor.
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Old 08-02-06, 12:04 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by racpat_rtw
What do you use to tie your gear on the rear rack? I have always used common bungee cords, they work fine but it seems they are not realy made for bikes. The hooks are too large and heavy. Has anyone seen something better?
Thanks,
Patrick
Yes ... bungie cords with smaller hooks. They do come in various sizes.
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Old 08-02-06, 12:08 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimblairo
Bungee cords eventually end up in the wheel. Also, many have experienced eye and hand injuries with them. Use compression straps.
Jim
I've been using bungie cords on my bicycles for ... oh ... probably about 20+ years, and so far they have NEVER ended up in my wheel, and I've NEVER experienced an injury with them.



About a month ago though I did have one break. It snapped right in the middle. Both hooks remained affixed to the bicycle rack where I had securely attached them, and the cord just popped apart. It didn't end up in the wheel or hurt me. That's the first and only time I've ever had any kind of incident with them.

I have, however, seen a number of people lose stuff off the back of their bicycles using alternative, non-elastic methods of securing their loads.
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Old 08-02-06, 06:11 AM   #16
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Machka obviously has her life savings in bungie cord stocks, so you people better stop badmouthing the most defenseless and frail member of the holy trinity (wd40, duct tape, and bungie cords).
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Old 08-02-06, 07:49 AM   #17
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yeah, the use of bungies is appropriate in limited apps,

but its' sophmoric to pledge unwavering allegiance to their dubious solidity and strength.

if you don't want to come to one day with an important piece of gear 60 kilometers behind you, id ditch the bungie idea in favor of a more secure lashing system.

.......suggesting cambuckles of many varieties, coupled to a stout nylon strap......
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Old 08-02-06, 08:39 AM   #18
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I have lost more gear from the rear rack, or had it come seriously loose, using compression straps than ever using my elastic straps. However, my "bungees" were homemade using materials sources from a ship chandlers. The cord was thin, and the hooks small stainless steel ones (about 1/4 the size of the standard bungee variety). The cords were cut to a length that suited my usual rack load while touring, then were stretched across and fastened so they were very snug (usually across the tent in a criss-cross formation). They were easily adaptable to other loads. The key seems to be how tightly they are cinched in the first place. The large size of the hooks on standard bungees is not helpful. I lost my homemade set somewhere (not riding) and haven't got around to replacing them yet.

On the other hand, I have used various compression straps, most lately ones salvaged as straps from old helmets. The most significant problem I have is that even if tightened at the start of the day, the load under them might shift or "settle", but there was no elasticity in the straps to compensate. Last year, I lost an entire top-of-the-rack load -- tent, groundsheet and water bladder -- without noticing on a rough (albeit sealed) road . Fortunately, I recovered the tent.

I have had straps of both varieties drop into the a wheel. It's not a problem associated just with bungees.
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Old 08-02-06, 09:16 AM   #19
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Switched from bungee to straps after bouncing some stuff off the rack on an off-road tour. The
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Old 08-02-06, 05:46 PM   #20
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No stock, no financial interests ÖÖÖ Iím just relating my experiences through years of cycling and years of observing other cyclists.

One thing I have observed among some bungie cord users is that they donít seem to know how to use them.

1) A few use cords that are way too big. Long or fat cords donít hold the bundles we would carry on our racks very well Ė they end up being too loose and involve all sorts of creative wrapping to come close to working. Big cords also usually have big hooks which are too cumbersome to work with, and a person could risk injury with those things. When you go shopping for bungie cords, buy a bag with a variety of sizes Ö and when in doubt, go small. You can get bungie cords that are 6Ē long, when unstretched, with very tiny hooks. Those work very well to hold down a rolled jacket or things like that. And the sizes go up from there. Most department and hardware stores have a fairly large selection, and they are not expensive.

2) Some donít pull the cords snug enough. Iíve seen people more or less drape the cord over their stuff, which creates the same effect as a compression strap Ö it doesnít hold their stuff! And they wonder why everything falls off. Youíve got to make sure the cord is tight so that the elastic can do what elastic is supposed to do.

3) Some donít attach the hooks properly. Iíve seen some people hook them to parts of the rack where they end up sliding all over the place, or to the cord itself, or some part of what they are trying to strap, or have them just barely attached at all so that they look like they are going to pop off any second. Youíve got to pick a spot where that hook is not going to move. When my bungie cord snapped in the middle, there was no way those hooks were going to come out of where Iíd hooked them without some very specific maneuvers on my part. Youíve also got to make sure the hook is a hooked shape. Some hooks, especially the smaller ones, can straighten out a bit which makes their hooking properties less effective. I double check mine every time before I use them.

4) Some people only use one bungie cord. One bungie cord can be all right in some situations, especially when transporting one smallish soft or lumpy object where the cord can sink in, and especially if youíve got the right sized cord, but if you are trying to carry anything large, smooth, or if you are trying to carry more than one object, you need more than one cord. One can be wrapped at one 45 degree angle, and the other can be wrapped at the other 45 degree angle to create a diamond-shaped pattern. And then if you want to do something like roll up your jacket and put it on the back, add a third (very small) bungie cord, rather than disrupt the secure pattern youíve created with the first two.



There is absolutely nothing wrong with using bungie cords Ö provided you have the right cord for the job and know how to use it.


If I were to go to another type of securing device it would have to be elastic, just like a bungie cord, to hold my stuff securely. From my observations of other cyclists, non-elastic types of strapping are just not reliable enough. They can also be dangerous. Iíve been following behind cyclists using non-elastic strapping when their gear has suddenly slid out and dropped onto the road right in front of me.



And youíve got the ďtrinityĒ wrong. Itís bungie cords, WD-40, and electrical tape. Tried and true!!
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Old 08-02-06, 10:09 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rowan
I have lost more gear from the rear rack, or had it come seriously loose, using compression straps than ever using my elastic straps. However, my "bungees" were homemade using materials sources from a ship chandlers. The cord was thin, and the hooks small stainless steel ones (about 1/4 the size of the standard bungee variety). The cords were cut to a length that suited my usual rack load while touring, then were stretched across and fastened so they were very snug (usually across the tent in a criss-cross formation). They were easily adaptable to other loads. The key seems to be how tightly they are cinched in the first place. The large size of the hooks on standard bungees is not helpful. I lost my homemade set somewhere (not riding) and haven't got around to replacing them yet.

On the other hand, I have used various compression straps, most lately ones salvaged as straps from old helmets. The most significant problem I have is that even if tightened at the start of the day, the load under them might shift or "settle", but there was no elasticity in the straps to compensate. Last year, I lost an entire top-of-the-rack load -- tent, groundsheet and water bladder -- without noticing on a rough (albeit sealed) road . Fortunately, I recovered the tent.

I have had straps of both varieties drop into the a wheel. It's not a problem associated just with bungees.
You need to stop cheaping out on compression straps. Mine are 1in thick and designed for holding goods tights (generally backpacking). Mine have never come use after thousands upon thousands of miles. Hoiwever, you need a good one that won't get loose.
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Old 08-02-06, 11:27 PM   #22
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I'm using mountaineering or backpacking straps. Bought mine at EMS. They're great, work 100%:

http://www.ems.com/catalog/product_detail_square.jsp?PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=845524441778821&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=282574489160642& bmUID=1154581646198"
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Old 08-03-06, 05:59 AM   #23
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Jandd makes a rack bungee that works well. It is small enough that I leave it on the rack all the time, just in case it is needed.

Quote:
Rack Bungee

Product ID: FRBUN
Description: Now you can hold down your load with a super strong Jandd Bungee Strap. Made with flat braided elastic for better load control. Each strap is made up of 2 lengths of bungee so that the load is held front and back with 1 strap. Our new rack bungee fits all of our rear racks and also our extreme front rack
Price: $5.95
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Old 08-03-06, 08:02 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nm+
You need to stop cheaping out on compression straps. Mine are 1in thick and designed for holding goods tights (generally backpacking). Mine have never come use after thousands upon thousands of miles. Hoiwever, you need a good one that won't get loose.
I am sure you miss the point of my post. Cheapness has nothing to do with it. Getting sufficient tension (not maintaining it through the buckles) is the fundamental here. Compression straps simply haven't done the job as well as the bungee cords that I have used. And I venture to say that excess strap left over after cinching is a nuisance, too, especially on lower volume loads.
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Old 08-03-06, 08:53 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Machka
I've been using bungie cords on my bicycles for ... oh ... probably about 20+ years, and so far they have NEVER ended up in my wheel, and I've NEVER experienced an injury with them.



About a month ago though I did have one break. It snapped right in the middle. Both hooks remained affixed to the bicycle rack where I had securely attached them, and the cord just popped apart. It didn't end up in the wheel or hurt me. That's the first and only time I've ever had any kind of incident with them.
Recently learned of an accident where a front bungee came loose. The guy never new what hit him as he did an endo over the bars, going downhill at 20+, when the bungeee hook locked up the front wheel. I will try never to use bungees again.

Haven't toured since Feb due to shoulder surgery. I'll use anything beside bungees from now on. Life is only a group of probabilities. Why take a chance?
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