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Old 10-20-06, 11:54 AM   #1
guruguhan
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4 season tent?

Hello,

I live in Canada and I'm hoping to do some winter touring this year or next. I'll be buying a tent, and I'm leaning towards a 4 season tent at the moment, but don't know if it is necessary. Of course, I'd like to save on weight if possible, and the cost of 4 seasons is also higher. Any thoughts are appreciated. Thanks
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Old 10-20-06, 12:00 PM   #2
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I should add that because of the cost of tents, I'm also leaning towards a two person, though most of my touring might be solo (though I hope to do some camping with friends). I've never owned a tent, so this might just be dumb excitement.
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Old 10-20-06, 12:05 PM   #3
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Excitement is good. I have a smallish tent which has only one door, and when it is shut, then no air from outside gets in. Can be stuffy, but it is really warm and dry. I think it's a northland something, and cost me only 50 bucks. I don't think it's necessary to drop tons of cash for a tent.
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Old 10-20-06, 12:31 PM   #4
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Thanks becnal. I should also add, that I have considered Hennesssy hammocks. I haven't ruled them out, but I'm not leaning towards it right now. i'd have to get a the Explorer Deluxe Asym. I also plan on stealth camping as often as I can, and I'm thinking that a hammock would be less suited to this. I also am not yet convinced that there will always be trees wherever I want to setup camp, so I'm weary. It seems like a great invention, but I'm hoping I can get one shelter to meet all my needs.
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Old 10-20-06, 12:55 PM   #5
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I have heard that since hammocks don't touch the ground, you lose a lot of heat that way... So that would obviously not be the way to go in winter.
Perhaps even more important than a 4-season tent is a 4-season sleeping bag?
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Old 10-20-06, 01:21 PM   #6
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The thing about four-season tents is the weight. Have you checked out any of these?

Four season tents from Mountain Equipment Co-op
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Old 10-20-06, 02:44 PM   #7
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I as in Gander Mountain the other day and they have several nice two man tents for under 200. I don't know how warm they would be in the winter, but I don't camp in the winter.
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Old 10-20-06, 03:09 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maximusvt
I have heard that since hammocks don't touch the ground, you lose a lot of heat that way... So that would obviously not be the way to go in winter.
Perhaps even more important than a 4-season tent is a 4-season sleeping bag?
I've heard the exact opposite. (A cold frozen ground sucks more heat than air) Anyone know for sure?
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Old 10-20-06, 03:11 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lolly Pop
The thing about four-season tents is the weight. Have you checked out any of these?

Four season tents from Mountain Equipment Co-op
Yup, all of them, I live a block away from MEC on King Street. My original post was referring to the weight, and I'm not sure I want to go for a 4 season, but if its necessary for winter camping, I'll have to deal with it. I'm wondering how many winter tourers use their 3 season tent.
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Old 10-20-06, 03:12 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDW3261
I as in Gander Mountain the other day and they have several nice two man tents for under 200. I don't know how warm they would be in the winter, but I don't camp in the winter.
Then its irrelevent to this thread. I'm sure there are many 2-men tents under $200. The whole point to this thread is to get one suitable for winter.
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Old 10-20-06, 03:13 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RDW3261
I as in Gander Mountain the other day and they have several nice two man tents for under 200. I don't know how warm they would be in the winter, but I don't camp in the winter.
The difference in temp outside and inside the tent at winter time is very small, the only thing you gain is the protection from outside weather and wind that make it feel warmer. That's what I have experienced anyway.

I'm going touring in asia next year and will spend quite alot of time in colder areas, anyone has any suggestions for good tents? I really don't have any experience in tents except for cheap ones so I dont know what to look for.

One tent I really seem to wanna buy is the Vaude Space K2 tent, anyone have tried that?
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Old 10-20-06, 03:33 PM   #12
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4 season tents are heavier because they are designed to support the weight of snow. So, if you think that's it's likely you will be out not only in cold weather, but also when it's apt to snow, then you should get a 4 season tent. But, if you don't plan on camping in a snow storm, then a 3 season will work.

Tent size: A one person tent will keep you about 15 degees warmer. I'll take that anytime on a cool night.
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Old 10-20-06, 04:33 PM   #13
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Hilleberg Nallo or North Face VE-25
http://www.hilleberg.com/Catalog/nallo_2_gt_926337.htm
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Old 10-20-06, 04:52 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by erikasberg
Hilleberg Nallo or North Face VE-25
http://www.hilleberg.com/Catalog/nallo_2_gt_926337.htm
Oh crap that was an expensive tent, although it seemed easy to set up. But I wonder how much top pressure it can take. My guess is that it will blow around pretty easily without storm tarps
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Old 10-20-06, 05:20 PM   #15
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North Face Westwind, available from the North Face Europe, under six pounds. only compact 4 season tent certified for Antarctic Survey survival kits on sledges there.

The Hillebergs are nice as well. a Hoop tent will save weight over the geodesic designs of most other 4 season tents. there was a nice 4 season hoop tent offered from MEC, but it may not be in their lineup this year.

Another option is to try an Epic- canopied tent by Black Diamond, or a single wall mountain tent. expensive and light.

I take a 4 season tent for touring when it is nasty or there will be snow.

Last edited by Bekologist; 10-21-06 at 07:21 AM.
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Old 10-20-06, 05:54 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guruguhan
I've heard the exact opposite. (A cold frozen ground sucks more heat than air) Anyone know for sure?
when you're out walking in the woods in the winter, and you sit down on a rock to take a break, what gets cold first?


main difference between a 3 and 4 season tent is the 4 season has heavier pole support for snow accumulating on roof. the expediton types add strength for severe wind. is this really likely to happen when you'll be riding - and if so, wouldn't you be looking for more serious shelter than a tent, like say, a motel?

sierra design has a 6ish lb 4 season tent, under 300 usd. dont recall the name, but its their lightest 4 season

here it is - replaces the retired orion ast model - but has more poles

http://canada.sierradesigns.com/tent...lay.php?id=481

these can be found on ebay highly discounted

Last edited by seeker333; 10-20-06 at 06:12 PM.
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Old 10-20-06, 10:29 PM   #17
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People generally don't use hammocks below freezing. You can sort of stretch their temperature range using a sleeping pad and an underquilt, but that gets to be pretty complicated and I don't think that you could make one warm enough for Canadian weather. I think that the coldest winter hammocking I've heard of was in Virginia or somewhere nearby.

The differences 4 and 3 season tents is in ability to handle heavy snow load, wind deflection, and breathability in sub-freezing temperatures. What this means is that you'll get a tent with a lot of poles that make a squat structure where there is no long panel distance between supports. 4-season tents are typically single wall, where you need to take care with your sleeping bag with the condensation that forms on the inside.

Most people can do all of their winter camping with a 3-season tent. Sometimes, this involves waking up a few times during a night snowstorm to whack the sides and dump off the snow, and sometimes you can have a rocky night in the wind since the tent will flex. A 4-season tent gives you more chance for undisturbed sleep and will be a lot less breezy on the inside than a 3-season. You'd be sacrificing the comfort features that most tents have for year-round use, though.

Sierra Designs does make many tents that handle wind very well. I've also heard good things about Eureka 4-season tents.
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Old 10-20-06, 10:50 PM   #18
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Expensive... yes, well designed... yes, family owned and operated... yes, each one hand made by one person... yes.
Here are some links:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilleberg
http://www.expeditioncanada.com/index.html
http://www.oneworldexpedition.com/index.php
http://www.chinawheelie.com/
http://www.hilleberg.com/NewNews.htm
http://www.guideschoice.com/scripts/...?idproduct=266

Can you get by with a less expensive tent? Certainly. Can you get by with a less expensive bike?....

One of the best places online you can find to drool over tents is: http://www.backcountry-equipment.com..._overview.html Nice daylight photos with sleeping bags and people inside for size reference. That's service.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweden_354
Oh crap that was an expensive tent, although it seemed easy to set up. But I wonder how much top pressure it can take. My guess is that it will blow around pretty easily without storm tarps
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Old 10-20-06, 11:18 PM   #19
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How long do tents last? Is this a lifetime purchase? I'm leaning towards the Hilleburg Nallo 2, but if it will only last 3/4 seasons, I might get something cheaper.
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Old 10-20-06, 11:33 PM   #20
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if you keep it from mildewing and excessive UV damage, a well sewn tent should last twenty years until the fatiguge just starts to wear them out.

use a ground sheet. two foam pads for winter. if you're in canada, buy the YELLOW Evazote pads at MEC instead of the standard blue ethafoam ones for greater warmth.

snow is warmer than air in the winter, fellas. To keep water from freezing solid overnight in winter conditions you bury big water bottles in snow upside down.


... That Nallo 2 GT would be a very solid tent choice for you.
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Old 10-21-06, 12:23 AM   #21
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Hammocks are cold. I don't use mine in the winter. When I camp in the winter, I use my smallest warmest tent.
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Old 10-21-06, 05:37 AM   #22
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Buy cheap buy twice (after many uncomfortable nights).

Check out the Staika if top load in important.
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Old 10-21-06, 07:07 AM   #23
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Any good three-season tent with full rain fly, little or no bug mesh and a few guyline anchor points will do. A tent is as solid as it is set-up.
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Old 10-21-06, 10:01 AM   #24
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Since you're in Canada, you have access to the Asolo line of tents. Check out the "Harrier 2" model -- it's a well-designed 2-person 4-season. Door, window, skylight all zip up air-tight (or open mesh, if you prefer).

I wouldn't claim it would hold up a heavy snow load; maybe it would, but that's not the kind of camping I do. Just want the extra warmth from closing up the vents. The Harrier2 weighs about 3.5kg, if I remember. I picked one up in Calgary a couple months ago -- I've been looking a long time to replace an old 4-season Clip Flashlight, and had just about given up. Every tent design is a compromise, but the Harrier2 is exactly what I'd been looking for: in my mind a perfect design, considering price and weight.

I did a lot of research online before I bought the tent. Apparently Asolo is famous for boots, and some company bought rights for the name to import tents. I didn't find any complaints about Asolo tents. I'd say the quality is above average (I wouldn't put it up at the North Face level, though). In fact, I rejected the first Harrier2 I set up in the store because one seam was sewn too tight. I spent a lot of time looking at tents, and I can't find any flaws in the construction of the one I got.

I got the Harrier2 for C$160 in August. Only problem is, it seems to be a 2005 model, and they might be hard to find now.

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Old 10-21-06, 10:29 AM   #25
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I think I will jump in and steal a question, If I want a 3season tent that is very easy to put up in rain, or in any condition for that matter.

My last tent had an ventilated inner canopy and then a outer shell that you had to cover the whole thing with. So when you set up the inner tent it rained in wich wasn't much fun at all.

Any suggestions? I don't want to pay more than 400$ for a 2 person tent. Weight isn't a issue but it would be neat if it doesn't weight 20kg's
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