Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-10-07, 04:19 PM   #1
Robert_in_ca
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Laguna Hills California
Bikes: Cannondale R3000, Specialized Enduro SL
Posts: 479
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Fishing while touring

Does anyone like to fish while they are touring?

I am wondering what would be a good, high quality, lightweight pole to use that either telescopes, or comes apart to fit in a pannier.

Also, what kind of cooking equipment do you use to prepare the fish you catch?
Robert_in_ca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-07, 05:16 PM   #2
NoReg
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 5,117
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
"pole". Imagine some trainer type yelling about refering to a rifle as a "gun", or a ship as a "boat".

I would love to do a trip that consisted of puttering around a narrow area with lots of good fishing, and doing some biking, camping and fishing. I don't think that there is normally time to fish on regular trips. In general I am driven when cycling and contemplative not driven when fishing, or at least driven about the fishing part.

I think it also depends on your standards. I guess I would fish for just about anything. But a lot of fishing that might crop up on a trip would be a bit like taking your bike on a trip to europe, but only having enough time available to ride a block to the local store, just not interesting. If one rode across america, for me there would be place i could never wet a line possibly for months, and then there are places one might want to stop for a week, and then the gear to exploit them would fill a bob.

I'm mostly a fly fisherman, but I think the most practical rod for just hanging out would be an ultralight spinning rod, with tiny marabou jigs on up. some plastics, a fly fishing bobber, a few spinners, etc... You could most easily feed yourself or hook into something with that rig. I would spool 2 pound test, and a tiny spinning reel. Get as many segments to the rod as possible, generally telescoping rods are low quality and heavier than need be.

OK the dream trip. There are areas in several states with amazing under-exploited spring creeks (fish live in bottled water), these have high concentrations of good small creeks, where a lot of wandering and circling would be the only way to go. Pretty rural so stealth or permision camping would be possible every night. Another area I haven't been to with high concentrations of good streams would be Yellowstone. I don't know whether a park like that is free enough to wander in but it's the kind of place with the potential.

Biggest problem is the difficulty of getitng licenses for a lot of different jurisdictions. Some good places only sell through head offices or guides to tourists, you can't easily pick up a non-resident license. Sometimes you can mail order, but often the urge only strikes when one is there, the weather is proven, etc... In some places if they wanted to encourage tourism, they should make it free to catch an release for tourists. Of course the better places usually have too many people not the reverse.
NoReg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-07, 05:24 PM   #3
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
Posts: 17,801
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peterpan1
I'm mostly a fly fisherman, but I think the most practical rod for just hanging out would be an ultralight spinning rod, with tiny marabou jigs on up. some plastics, a fly fishing bobber, a few spinners, etc... You could most easily feed yourself or hook into something with that rig. I would spool 2 pound test, and a tiny spinning reel. Get as many segments to the rod as possible, generally telescoping rods are low quality and heavier than need be.
Fly fishing gear make more sense for us cyclists. You don't need a lot of gear if you don't mind wet wading, you don't need a lot of flies...just pick up local ones as needed, and the equipment is pretty light. I have a 3 wt pack rod that I got from Cabelas (the Nashbar of fishing ) that's not a bad rod. It's not as good as my Scott or my 2 wt Loomis (found while bicycling ) but I have used it and it casts well enough.
__________________
Stuart Black
New! Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
New! Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-07, 05:52 PM   #4
greenstork
Senior Member
 
greenstork's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Seattle, WA
Bikes:
Posts: 584
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm a fly fisherman so this is almost sacrilegious even making this recommendation. If you want a good lightweight spinner rod that works for pretty much any fish up to 5-6 lbs., take a look at a Shakespeare rod & reel combo.

I love fly fishing and I love biking but I just can't picture mixing the two. That said, there were many times fishing that I wish I had a bike with me to cover some distance up or downstream. There are plenty of lightweight fly rods available too, that break down to 4 pieces or more. The problem with fly fishing, as I see it, is that there's simply too much gear you need to bring along to do it right.
greenstork is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-07, 06:51 PM   #5
librarian
Senior Member
 
librarian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Ocean City, NJ
Bikes: Giant OCR Touring, Raleigh Sport Comfort, Cannondale ST400, Cannondale Road Bike
Posts: 243
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I got this from Cabelas I also got a rod/reel tube when they were on sale for $9.99 to carry it in. It dosen't say on it but the rod test out as an 8 wt.
__________________
librarian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-07, 10:03 PM   #6
FlowerBlossom
My tank takes chocolate.
 
FlowerBlossom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Olympia, WA
Bikes: Trek 600 series touring bike, Trek 800 hybrid, Bianchi
Posts: 6,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I could totally see taking a bike tour, let's say to the Henry's Fork, ride bike to your fishin' spot, fish a bit, and pack up and head to camp for the night. Get up, do a little fishin' before heading down the road to the next campsite. Sounds pretty sweet to me.

Well, ok, I don't fish, but I have tried to fly fish once, and loved being there. I'd bring a book instead of a fly rod. And, I have packed a book and read next to the Henry's Fork. It was lovely. A bike would have been wonderful...whipped cream on the hot fudge sundae.
__________________
Feminism is the profound notion that women are human beings.
FlowerBlossom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-07, 10:05 PM   #7
FlowerBlossom
My tank takes chocolate.
 
FlowerBlossom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Olympia, WA
Bikes: Trek 600 series touring bike, Trek 800 hybrid, Bianchi
Posts: 6,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
P.S. I don't know if you can keep on the Henry's Fork. It might be catch-and-release.
__________________
Feminism is the profound notion that women are human beings.
FlowerBlossom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-07, 10:20 PM   #8
velonomad 
Older I get, Better I was
 
velonomad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Greenfield Lake, Wilmington NC
Bikes: '14 BD Lurch Fatbike, '10 custom road,'06 custom expedition, '94 Yokota Tandem, '88 custom MTB
Posts: 1,673
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
I'm not into fly fishing, 1/32 oz homemade spoons are my poison.I usually don't carry fishing gear on a tour. I have a 6' light action telescoping fiberglass rod I made from a Orvis blank about 10 years ago that I carry around on the bike for day or weekend tours .

This year when I tour through Pa on the ATA trail. I'm taking a rig with me and I'm getting a two day PA license to fish the upper Yougheny and Casselman rivers as I pass through.
velonomad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-07, 11:42 PM   #9
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
Posts: 17,801
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenstork
I love fly fishing and I love biking but I just can't picture mixing the two. That said, there were many times fishing that I wish I had a bike with me to cover some distance up or downstream. There are plenty of lightweight fly rods available too, that break down to 4 pieces or more. The problem with fly fishing, as I see it, is that there's simply too much gear you need to bring along to do it right.
I can see bring lots of gear to huck lures or bait dunk. Lures are large by definition and bait dunking is ...well...bait dunking but, if you really think about fly fishing, it can be the simplest form and the least complicated. I can fish with a rod, reel, 6x tippet, a clipper, a little bit of floatant, and a box of flies. Most of the time, I hardly need more than one fly for a whole day of fishing. Sure it's nice to have boots and waders and tons of flies but, really, are they necessary?

Here in Colorado there are lots of streams that are so small that you can step across them but they hold some wonderful fish. Hermosa Creek near Durango, for example, has a great population of greenbacks and is easily fordable at nearly every point. And it switches back and forth across the upper head waters so much that you hardly need to walk more then a mile of linear distance to cover 3 miles of stream. Small stream fish are less than picky and, if the stream has a good population of brookies, all you really need is a strike indicator (I've had wrestling matches with brookies over my indicator ).

And if you are in an area of warm water fishing, blue gills are even easier...dumb as a bag of hammers, will take anything and are loads of fun Fishing for them is kind of like riding a Unobtainium bike in flip-flops to get ice cream. You are going to win any prizes, you look silly as hell but you have a grin a mile wide
__________________
Stuart Black
New! Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
New! Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-07, 03:19 AM   #10
NoReg
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 5,117
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
When you like flyfishing, it's the only choice, but then you probably don't need to ask this question,

The attached fly would be a killer on a lot of fish in the bass, trout, panfish, a clump of a few hundred of these weighs about the same as a kleenex (well not if they all had brass beads, it was just the only one I had lying around).
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Mvc-040s.jpg (20.3 KB, 8 views)
NoReg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-07, 06:05 PM   #11
robow
Senior Member
 
robow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 2,645
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
I love to carrry with me a pack fly rod of sorts when I tour. I build custom rods for a hobby so it was easy to build a fly/spin combo rod in a 5 piece design. Cycocumute hit it on the head when he stated how light your gear can be. The rod will weigh about 3 oz., the reel about 4 oz, and a small fly box with a few leaders and tippet only a few ounces. The problem comes about when you see some inviting water but then you come to grip with the fact that you have so many miles to get in. It works out great if you can stop for the day near some good water. Much better than reading the evening away.
robow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-07, 06:13 PM   #12
Robert_in_ca
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Laguna Hills California
Bikes: Cannondale R3000, Specialized Enduro SL
Posts: 479
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for all the replies!

Any tips on preparing the fish to eat and cooking?
Robert_in_ca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-07, 06:45 PM   #13
Tom Stormcrowe
Out fishing with Annie on his lap, a cigar in one hand and a ginger ale in the other, watching the sunset.
 
Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: South Florida
Bikes: Techna Wheelchair and a Sun EZ 3 Recumbent Trike
Posts: 16,120
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert_in_ca
Thanks for all the replies!

Any tips on preparing the fish to eat and cooking?
Clean, filet, pack in foil with onion, butter and a bit of garlic, serve with instant rice cooked on the camping stove.

Fish is cooked over an open fire banked to coals.

MMMMMMM, good!
__________________
. “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

"We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant
Tom Stormcrowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-07, 08:29 PM   #14
chromedome
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 366
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert_in_ca
Does anyone like to fish while they are touring?

I am wondering what would be a good, high quality, lightweight pole to use that either telescopes, or comes apart to fit in a pannier.

Also, what kind of cooking equipment do you use to prepare the fish you catch?
I have a 4 piece, 9', 4 weight, Lamiglas that I take sometimes. Its roughly the same length as tent poles, so I pack it with them to protect it. Also, if it gets busted, I'm not out a lot of money.

Gut a fish, smear with butter (optional) and wrap with a couple layers of foil and place directly on the rocks or embers of a campfire and cook for about ten to fifteen minutes (until the skin peels back easily.) If you have cooked bacon, you can put a piece of that inside before you cook it. The meat should easily pull away from the bones and be moist and tasty.
chromedome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-07, 10:32 AM   #15
GTcommuter
Easily distracted...
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Decatur, Ga
Bikes: Surley Cross Check
Posts: 1,067
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Fishing is one of my main destinations for touring trips. I grew up fly-fishing but have recently gotten more into spin fishing, which can occasionally be easier on slow water in the middle to south parts of my state.

My main touring rod (like cyccommute) is a light weight 8ft 5wt 5-piece fly rod from Cabela's. That one goes on every trip just in case I stumble upon a nice spot. And Cabela's has a great replacement warranty since I'm really hard on my gear. I'll carry one of my nice travel rods -- Winston or Gray's -- if I'm going out specifically to fish. Reel is usually a nice Bauer that has seen a lot of abuse.

My touring pack always includes: annual license; 2-3 9' 4x leaders; spools of 3x, 4x, & 5x tippet; hemostats, water thermometer, floatant gel, or some other little pieces of misc gear. I also carry a 5 oz birding monocular that helps me spot potentially fishy sites across a lake and is fun for watching birds or wildlife in the area.

My fly box always includes: Hare's Ear soft hackles, Muskrat soft hackles, Pheasant Tail nymphs, Elk Hair Caddis, foam ants, black Wooly Boogers, San Juan worms, Y2K bugs, Bream Busters, and some generic dear-hair bass bugs. I'll usually pick up some local flies, but this assortment gets me through 90% of my fishing situations for trout, bream, bass, and crappie.

The small fishing bag (flies, leader, misc) weighs maybe 6-7 oz. The rod, reel, and case are about a pound and a half but I haven't weighed them. I'll carry a pair of sandals during the summer time for wading.

My small spinning rod and reel are about the same but I don't have a good lure box yet, still learning about that stuff. If anything I'll carry a small jar of PowerBait which works but doesn't feel good to me.

An even easier fishing set up would be a long but light-weight fly blank built with minimum guides, no reel seat, and a small handle. You could use it as a "pole" with found worms or bugs or whatnot. But flies are so versatile, fun, and light-weight that I won't travel without them.

The other guys are right on -- gut and clean the fish, wrap in foil, smother in coals from a campfire. Garnish with whatever's available and serve with whatever else you have. It's hard to go wrong with fresh fish in the out of doors.
GTcommuter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-07, 10:36 AM   #16
GTcommuter
Easily distracted...
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Decatur, Ga
Bikes: Surley Cross Check
Posts: 1,067
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by robow
I build custom rods for a hobby so it was easy to build a fly/spin combo rod in a 5 piece design.
Very cool, robow. What part of the country are you in? Do you frequent any of the rod building forums? I've been building fly rods for a few years now, gradually getting pretty good at it. Actually I'm working on a somewhat garish blue and orange rod for a Gator's fan right now.
GTcommuter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-07, 05:43 PM   #17
robow
Senior Member
 
robow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 2,645
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
GT, I'm from east central IL, so our sport fly fishing is for smallies on the local rivers, panfish like crappie and bluegill in the ponds and lakes, and gar and carp if you want to spend some time with strong pulling trash fish. In my opinion, Tom Kirkman's Rodbuilding.org is probably the finest forum with knowledgable and friendly folk that you can always glean information from. BTW, My daughter attends the U of Illinois, so orange and blue can never be considered garish.
robow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-07, 12:03 AM   #18
Rogerinchrist
Senior Member
 
Rogerinchrist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Plymouth,WI
Bikes: TREK-520 & 830
Posts: 724
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute

And if you are in an area of warm water fishing, blue gills are even easier...dumb as a bag of hammers, will take anything and are loads of fun Fishing for them is kind of like riding a Unobtainium bike in flip-flops to get ice cream. You are going to win any prizes, you look silly as hell but you have a grin a mile wide
An ultra light spin reel with my ice fishin' rod, under 18" long (I think). I'll use 1 or 2lb ice line as it's a bit tougher. One or two small jigs, spoons & bare hooks for live worms/ grubs/ flys with a balsa wood "pencil" bobber for still water. You'd be surprised how well this'll cast with a tiny float/ bobber. All wrapped in a bit of denim to protect the hooks, weighs next to nuthin' & takes very little space!

Foil cooked or pan fryed on the stove.
Rogerinchrist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-07, 09:41 AM   #19
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
Posts: 17,801
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogerinchrist
An ultra light spin reel with my ice fishin' rod, under 18" long (I think). I'll use 1 or 2lb ice line as it's a bit tougher. One or two small jigs, spoons & bare hooks for live worms/ grubs/ flys with a balsa wood "pencil" bobber for still water. You'd be surprised how well this'll cast with a tiny float/ bobber. All wrapped in a bit of denim to protect the hooks, weighs next to nuthin' & takes very little space!

Foil cooked or pan fryed on the stove.
To each his own. I could catch fish on a lure even if the lure was a hand grenade I can catch stuff on a bit of fluff and a fly line anytime. Plus it's just more elegant than lure huckin' Don't get me started on bait dunkin'!*
__________________
Stuart Black
New! Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
New! Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-07, 09:42 AM   #20
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
Posts: 17,801
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute
To each his own. I could catch fish on a lure even if the lure was a hand grenade I can catch stuff on a bit of fluff and a fly line anytime. Plus it's just more elegant than lure huckin' Don't get me started on bait dunkin'!*

*Just kidding. I dunked plenty of bait before I got enlightened...and snobby Never did figure out lures.
__________________
Stuart Black
New! Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
New! Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-07, 01:41 PM   #21
bmclaughlin807
Crankenstein
 
bmclaughlin807's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Spokane
Bikes: Novara Randonee (TankerBelle)
Posts: 4,038
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute
And if you are in an area of warm water fishing, blue gills are even easier...dumb as a bag of hammers, will take anything and are loads of fun Fishing for them is kind of like riding a Unobtainium bike in flip-flops to get ice cream. You are going to win any prizes, you look silly as hell but you have a grin a mile wide
Yes, and they taste pretty damn good, too. Hell, I caught a bluegill with my bare hand once... Was playing with a bobber that you could fill up with water, it flooded and sank into a large tin can... I reached in to grab it, and came out with a fish!

I used to have a pole that was about 2 ft long, I carried that thing all over the place on my bike when I was in high school. Man, getting 20 miles or so out into the woods with no cars around made for some great fishing.
__________________
"There is no greater wonder than the way the face and character of a woman fit so perfectly in a man's mind, and stay there, and he could never tell you why. It just seems it was the thing he most wanted." Robert Louis Stevenson

Last edited by bmclaughlin807; 01-13-07 at 01:47 PM.
bmclaughlin807 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-07, 06:11 PM   #22
FlowerBlossom
My tank takes chocolate.
 
FlowerBlossom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Olympia, WA
Bikes: Trek 600 series touring bike, Trek 800 hybrid, Bianchi
Posts: 6,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogerinchrist

Foil cooked or pan fryed on the stove.
I vote foil. Lighter, make a "pocket", add onions, salt, pepper, you're in heaven!!

Dangit, this thread. I want summer. NOW.
__________________
Feminism is the profound notion that women are human beings.
FlowerBlossom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:26 PM.