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  1. #1
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    LHT with Nashbar Steel fork with Disc Mounts

    So I was considering having my LHT modified for Disc brake mounts, but then I saw these.

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile_morei...283&brand=0001



    For only 39 bucks, it's worth it, I think.

    I would just run cantis on the rear, but have much better brake power up front and still have the eyelets for a front rack. I'd lose the mid fork rack braze on, but a clamp can be used instead, or what about using the canti posts to help secure the rack?

    Has anyone considered this?

    What are your thoughts?

  2. #2
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    I'm building a 69er around this fork. It's a pretty good riding fork from what I have heard. It's a hunky beast like a MTB fork, and with all the discounts it's cheaper than buying the parts to build a fork, a lot cheaper. I'm going to run a BB7 up front, and a Neo Retro. Mine is pretty nice, there is possibly a smidge of misalignement on the canti studs, or it just looks that way (never bother to check other people's frames as long as the parts fit on. The BB7 aligns perfectly. There are racks like te Old Man racks that hang off the canti studs.

    The distance from the center of the axle to the base of your headset below the head tube (crown race) is 16.125". You would want that distance to be very similar to your LHT fork before substituting anything.

    Another option is to stay with your current fork and rig a bracket for the disc brake. You can make this thing that fits on the axle and holds the brake astride the disc. You use a tether to stop it spinning. Comon motorcycle set-up. On springer the legs go in different directions than the rotors when the bike goes over a bump, so the brake has to be attached to the axle or it would move out of position.

    http://www.fabkevin.com/projects/num...drilling05.jpg
    Last edited by NoReg; 01-16-07 at 02:26 AM.

  3. #3
    George Krpan
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    Makes me think whether I want to build a LHT or a Karate Monkey. KM, I think.

  4. #4
    Senior Member brianmcg123's Avatar
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    Would the Instigator fork work for you?

    http://www.surlybikes.com/forks.html





    PS: Edit, nevermind, I thought the Instigator was their 29" bike. Its for 26" wheels. But the Karate Monkey fork may do the trick.
    Everyone's a roadie, they just might not know it yet.

  5. #5
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    I mostly like this fork

    I've used this fork on my road tandem, because it's beefy. And it's worked great in that application.

    I bought a second one to convert a marin hybrid frame into a touring bike (that project didn't work out quite like I wanted so I sold the frame & kept the fork).

    I like this as a touring fork. It gives a decent ride, and the color goes with anything. My only wish: that it had a mid-blade eyelet for a rack. But a rubber coated u-bolt will work well too. The fork blades are round, so a u-bolt to attach a lowrider would work great.

  6. #6
    cyclopath vik's Avatar
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    Just keep in mind the LHT's fork is designed to be strong yet compliant - absorbing road shock and making for a comfortable ride as well as being stable. You may negatively affect both those characteristics with this fork, but if your investment is low you can always try it out and go back if you don't like it.
    safe riding - Vik
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  7. #7
    Beer and nachos today!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert_in_ca
    So I was considering having my LHT modified for Disc brake mounts, but then I saw these.

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile_morei...283&brand=0001



    For only 39 bucks, it's worth it, I think.

    I would just run cantis on the rear, but have much better brake power up front and still have the eyelets for a front rack. I'd lose the mid fork rack braze on, but a clamp can be used instead, or what about using the canti posts to help secure the rack?

    Has anyone considered this?

    What are your thoughts?
    You may be able to have mid-fork eyelets installed by a framebuilder, no? I talked to an LBS about it for an old mtb fork I have...$40.

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    I think it is compliant, because A) I know of one frame builder who uses these on his custom touring frames, and B) the company says not to use them on tandems, that makes me guess they aren't overbuilt. I don't think I will have mine on the road until early summer. Just guesswork for now.

    You can certainly add the mid fork mounts later though it would queer the powdercoat. Also, the legs are round and about the perfect size for a U fitting. I don't see any harm in using the canti studs if one is using discs. Some people complain about the rack on boss mounting with brakes, I don't really agree with that, but it isn't an issue here. There are lots of places to mount a front rack. Often the better racks don't mount level with the given mid fork mounts.

  9. #9
    __________ seeker333's Avatar
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    1. That fork is a pig - 2.9 lbs vs the 2.2 lb surly fork it would replace. Better off with this one geometry-wise:

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...20Road%20Forks

    2. It's gonna raise your front end 20mm (410 vs 390mm). Will reduce minimum handlebar height 20 mm. Tilt the seat tube and head tubes back ~0.5 deg, with minor effect on turning/handling. SO height increased 10-15mm. BB and saddle height increase 9mm. Saddle further back behind BB. Further to reach ground at stops.

    3. Although the fork has eyelets, the brake will interfere with normal fender mount and rack mount. You'll need to bend the stay or attach to fork leg. You'll need a disc compatible rack. Like an OMM, for example. Regular racks probably will not fit.

    4. Brake lever compatibility may be an issue. Gonna use a road specific disc brake?

    5. You'll need a new front hub/wheel. Not cheap. Also lose a little wheel strength due to dish required for disc hub, not a big deal since front is usually well above needs.

    6. That fork plus a disc brake plus longer housing run will increase bike weight 1.5-2.5 lbs.

    7. That fork is narrower than lht and will reduce maximum tire size.

    So, thats a lot of complication and expense for improved wet braking performance. I like discs and have them on 2 bikes, but I don't think I'd do this to a LHT. Doesn't have enough benefit to offset items 1-7 above IMO.

    Disc forks generally have larger diameter, stiffer legs to handle braking force. That dimension/nashbar fork will be stiffer than the LHT fork and beat you up a little more. Conversely, the LHT stock fork is not well suited to disc brake modification (say, by just attaching a std 51 mm tab) since it will bend a good bit more than a properly sized disc fork. So, I recc. againt modifying lht fork. Your builder would too if he knew what he was doing.

    Appearance wise she'll look more mtb-ish. Maybe you should just build a mtb?
    Last edited by seeker333; 01-16-07 at 07:04 PM.

  10. #10
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    Great info, thanks for taking the time to look into it.

    I think I'll try out the Shimano BR-R550 and BL-400 brake setup instead.

  11. #11
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    It seems kinda one sided to call the fork a pig, then go on about how other forks are too light or narrow for disc brakes, tires etc.... I weighed the fork in question and mine is jus a hair under 2.9, but that is without the trimmed tube (pressumably also true for the Surly). So we are talking 8 ounces difference. Where the weight really packs on further is with the disc hubs and brakes. All that stuff is heavy, and I am willing to believe that the end result of my approach will not be entirely pleasing. But on the other hand, lots of folks use discs, even on otherwise minimals, like single speeds. I'm only running the front disc so it isn't all that bad. The key is to make sure that the weight of everything doesn't go up by 20%, as long as it's just the one part or so it shouldn' t be a problem.

    I've looked longingly at that carbon fork, but I have a hard time seeing running a heavy front rack on it. I couldn't see where it says what the drops are built of, but if they are alloy, I'm not hanging touring loads off those eyelets. Still, it would probably run a canti/axle racks nicely enough.

  12. #12
    George Krpan
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    I agree with seeker333, too much hassle.

    Also, you'd have to get the fork painted to match unless you were grossly insensitive.

    The brake lever compatibility issue would arise only if you were trying to use brakes that were not compatible with your levers.

    You could offset the ride quality penalty by using fatter tires but this fork does not permit that.
    And, fatter tires are heavier.

    If you've really got to have disk brakes, transfer your parts to a Karate Monkey. At least you could run the fattest tires available. The head and seat angles of the KM and Pacer, Surly's road frame, are identicle in the size that I ride. So a KM should ride well on the road.

    Avid makes a sweet pair of v-brakes called Ultimate. They are CNC'd with a precision bearing.
    Jenson USA says "its stopping power will amaze even disc brake devotees". I had a pair of their predecessor, Arch Supreme, they were extraordinary. But you'd have to use v-brake compatible levers.
    I don't have good experience with v-brake adaptors. The Ultimate is $90 a pair, the same or more than disks.

  13. #13
    Look ma...no brakes! Accident's Avatar
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    I wanted to revive this thread because I was thinking of using disc brakes on my 26" LHT.
    Currently I'm using XT V-brakes, however the wheels I had built use XT disc hubs with Mavic XM719 rims. Ideally I'd like to extend the life of the rims as much as possible by not wearing them down with pads. I've toured in mountains and noticed how much stress is placed on the brakes/rims from braking fully loaded; disc brakes would lessen this. Wet weather fully loaded, the braking is sluggish, even with salmon koolstops. So what I've considered is getting Avid BB7's and keeping my V-brakes for backups. I spoke to my local frame builder about getting disc tabs welded on the rear to not obstruct with my rack (tubus cargo) and it seems very possible. Even though the frame is solid, can the LHT handle disc brake stress on the rear? We would have to remove the spoke holder (no big deal since I carry extras elsewhere). For the front fork, I'm still looking for a fork that will keep canti bosses, have disc tabs and not change the ride quality significantly.
    1x1 or Instigator look like possibilities.
    So with all these changes in mind, would it be worth it? Realistically, I'd get a frame setup for this initially, but I haven't found anything reasonable. If nothing else, the bike has performed very well so if this doesn't work out then no big deal.
    Thanks for your help!

  14. #14
    Senior Member Nigeyy's Avatar
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    I don't know about if the LHT can handle a rear disc brake, but I do think you should carefully look at your costs. Don't forget to add in the cost of repainting the area -done professionally it would be an extra expense. And how much will it cost to do a good job of welding the mounts on?

    My second thought is are you trying to make this bike something it isn't? (i.e. a good touring bike with traditional brake mounts to a bike with disc mounts). Is it worth looking for a frame that matches more your requirements?

    FYI, my tourer has discs, and I do love them. About 3 months ago I posted about touring the Yorkshire Dales on my backup touring bike with traditional canti brakes, and while adequate, I couldn't help thinking the Avid BB7 road discs would have fared much better.

  15. #15
    Look ma...no brakes! Accident's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nigeyy View Post
    I don't know about if the LHT can handle a rear disc brake, but I do think you should carefully look at your costs. Don't forget to add in the cost of repainting the area -done professionally it would be an extra expense. And how much will it cost to do a good job of welding the mounts on?

    My second thought is are you trying to make this bike something it isn't? (i.e. a good touring bike with traditional brake mounts to a bike with disc mounts). Is it worth looking for a frame that matches more your requirements?

    FYI, my tourer has discs, and I do love them. About 3 months ago I posted about touring the Yorkshire Dales on my backup touring bike with traditional canti brakes, and while adequate, I couldn't help thinking the Avid BB7 road discs would have fared much better.
    You make a great point about making the bike something its not. I just would prefer to use disc brakes in the long run without having the invest in a completely new frame. I would be paying for parts and not labor for the disc tabs, and the powder coat would be $70 locally since it would be with a group of bikes. I am going to continue looking for frames that would be worthy of touring and just swap everything over. Thanks for your input!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nigeyy View Post
    I don't know about if the LHT can handle a rear disc brake
    The Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 has a disk-brake tab on the rear (the bike comes with cantis). Also note the bridge between the stays. The Sherpa has a similar purpose to the LHT, which should mean the frames are comparable.

    http://www.pbase.com/image/71595052.jpg

    (From this thread: rocky mountain sherpa 30 )

    While a front disk brake might be better, it's possible that a rear disk brake would work well-enough to add improve stopping in wet conditions. And the rear disk would improve braking over a rear rim brake.
    Last edited by njkayaker; 01-21-09 at 05:41 PM.

  17. #17
    Older than dirt CCrew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Accident View Post
    I spoke to my local frame builder about getting disc tabs welded on the rear to not obstruct with my rack (tubus cargo) and it seems very possible.
    Don't know if it's possible as I don't have that frame, but a lot of the manufacturers are starting to move the rear caliper in the V between the seatstays and chainstays. I have a Gary Fisher set up that way and it's a really solid mount point yet out of the way for fenders and racks.

    More issue with the front. I actually tweaked my setup so that one of the SKS fender stays attaches to the disc body. TRying to run a front rack Is tough, that front disc takes up some real estate.

    -Roger

  18. #18
    Look ma...no brakes! Accident's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCrew View Post
    Don't know if it's possible as I don't have that frame, but a lot of the manufacturers are starting to move the rear caliper in the V between the seatstays and chainstays. I have a Gary Fisher set up that way and it's a really solid mount point yet out of the way for fenders and racks.

    More issue with the front. I actually tweaked my setup so that one of the SKS fender stays attaches to the disc body. TRying to run a front rack Is tough, that front disc takes up some real estate.

    -Roger
    Roger, I didn't specify, but the mount point for the rear wouldn't be on the seatstay like is normally done, but like you mentioned in between the seatstay and chainstay. For this reason, I was confident that it would work out.

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