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Thread: Flatbar touring

  1. #1
    Senior Member George's Avatar
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    Flatbar touring

    I don't have much of a choice as I have RA and find it difficult to get into the drops. I've narrowed my search down to the, Jamis Coda,(I don't know what model yet),and the Bianchi Strada. I have the Trek FX 7300 and I have it pretty well set up,but my son needs a bike and I was going to give him that. Any help will be appreciated,thanks George
    George

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    Senior Member bikebuddha's Avatar
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    George, check out trekking bars, they offer plenty of hand positions and a more upright posture than drops.

    As far as bikes go I really liked the strada except for it's carbon fork. I guess I'm just old fashioned.
    The few, the proud, the likely insane, Metro-Atlanta bicycle commuters.

  3. #3
    cyclopath vik's Avatar
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    +1 for trekking bars. If I didn't like drops better they would be my touring bar of choice.
    safe riding - Vik
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    I bought a Jamis Coda Sport (2006) recently, mostly for commuting, and I'm impressed. It's really comfortable, runs well and has all the braze-ons racks, bottles and for low rider front racks. I think, once you go up to the next model up, you get carbon forks and no low rider mounts.

    Ian

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    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
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    FWIW, I use a flat-bar folding bike (Xootr Swift) for touring, with a pair of Ergon grips and bar-ends. Works pretty well for me.

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    George Krpan
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    Both of those bikes are nice but neither one is a touring bike. But I understand that ready to ride touring bikes come with drop handlebars. Have you considered getting one and then changing it to a flat handlebar? It's not hard to do and it's much cheaper than changing a flat bar bike to a drop handlebar. Also, are you aware of cyclocross levers? They are auxiliary brake levers that allow you to brake from the tops just like a flat bar bike. You'd have a drop bar but you'd never have to get in the drops. You don't lose the ability to brake from the regular brake levers so you can ride the hoods too. I have this setup on a couple of bikes and it works perfectly. It's nice to be on the tops on long descents, you can take in the surroundings better.

  7. #7
    Proxymoron
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    Another Coda rider

    Quote Originally Posted by George McClusky
    I don't have much of a choice as I have RA and find it difficult to get into the drops. I've narrowed my search down to the, Jamis Coda,(I don't know what model yet),and the Bianchi Strada. I have the Trek FX 7300 and I have it pretty well set up,but my son needs a bike and I was going to give him that. Any help will be appreciated,thanks George
    I also ride a Coda Sport and, like simsi, find it to be an impressive bike. For me a steel frame is the way to go for city biking or touring due to its ride quality and durability. The Strada is also a good bike with a more traditional geometry and I was considering one but couldn`t justify the additional cost vs. what the Coda had to offer. Something you might find helpful is to go to the "Search The Forums" feature at the top of the page and type in your search parameters and see what other people have to say about the bikes. You`re going to end up with a good bike either way. Hope this helps and good luck!

  8. #8
    Slowpoach
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    Bar ends are good. You can mount them as normal, or in addition you can mount some inwards of your brake/shifter levers, like timetrial aero bars but lighter (and unfortunately without the forearm rests).

    I found I spent most time with my hands at the end of the bars, at the base of the bar ends; a little time on the ends of the bar ends; and later, when I tried the 2nd set of bar ends they were good for headwinds or long straight sections. (I now use drops)

  9. #9
    Senior Member George's Avatar
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    Well I went and did it. I bought a Jamis Coda Elite. I figure for the touring I'm going to do all I'll need is a rack for the back and a handlebar bag up front. I liked the upgraded parts on it over the Strad,as well as the disk brakes.The only thing I'm concerned about is the cranks, which are 52/42/30. He said he would change them out to whatever I wanted. For the most part I'll be riding on pretty flat land, but I'm also going to be riding in the Hill Country of Texas. Any suggestion would sure be apprecated. George
    George

  10. #10
    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
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    That was quick

    A Trek 520 has a 52/42/30 with an 11/32T cassette, takes you down to 23 gear inches. That should be plenty low, so I'd say the front 3 should be adequate.

    If in doubt, take it up a steep hill and see if it works for you in the grannies.

  11. #11
    Senior Member George's Avatar
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    Thanks Bacciaqalupe, I've been going a lot of nights trying to find the right bike for me and I hope I did right. When I posted I almost knew the answer, but it's always better to get a second opinion.I really happy with this bike shop,but it's quite a way from the house. I just got done talking to him again and he said he'll do anything I want. This is the first time in 5 bikes that I've had this kind of service.
    George

  12. #12
    Proxymoron
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    Congrats, George. Nice bike! Your Coda`s stock drivetrain should be able to handle just about any terrain you`ll likely encounter here in our region of The Peoples` Republic of Texas. I second the bar-end recommendation, too. They provide additional hand positions as well as providing added leverage for climbing. Enjoy!

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