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  1. #1
    actin' the foo ragboy's Avatar
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    clipless on an old bike -- am I nuts?

    Am I nuts for considering replacing my toe clips with clipless pedals on a 1987 road bike I use to commute 12 roundtrip? The reason I'm considering is I'll be doing my first multi-day tour later this summer. If I had a newer bike, I probably wouldn't hesitate, but does it make sense to spend the money on an old workhorse daily commuter?

    Also, what are your thoughts on touring (60-70 miles a day) with toe clips? Does it get uncomfortable?

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    GJD
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    I added some welgo SPD pedals to my early 80s bike I use regularly and have not regretted it since. I can no longer imagine not having them.

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    Gone, but not forgotten Shiznaz's Avatar
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    Pedals are easily switched between bikes so don't worry about losing your investment. They would be totally acceptable on a 1987 bike, even to a retro snob. Welcome to the 1980's, clipless is great!

    Here is Bernard Hinault in 1985 (one of the years he won the Tour de France) on his LOOK pedals and SIDI shoes.

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    Senior Member bike4life's Avatar
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    ragboy - Clips are great, I wouldn't hesitate for a second.

    Shiznaz - I've never seen handlebars like that, what kind is Bernard using?

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    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bike4life
    ragboy - Clips are great, I wouldn't hesitate for a second.

    Shiznaz - I've never seen handlebars like that, what kind is Bernard using?
    Early TT bar, No aerobars?
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


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    Senior Member brianmcg123's Avatar
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    Its a bullhorn. Pretty standard on a TT bike back in the day befor Lemond road some aerobars in 1989.



    The ones Hinault is using actually look like some chopped and flipped road bars. But the idea is the same.

    A regular bullhorn:
    Everyone's a roadie, they just might not know it yet.

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    Gone, but not forgotten Shiznaz's Avatar
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    As already said above, they are most likely road drop bars that have had the drop sections cut off, and then flipped, especially if you take a look at how much they curve up at the ends. This was to allow for proper mounting of the aero levers. Purpose built bullhorns don't curve up to this extent because they are designed for use with TT bar end levers.

    This style of bars was already pretty popular for times track events, and it eventually made its way to road time trials, and the the full on aero bars were introduced by Lemond (inspired by triathlon racing). It was a period of great change for cycling as the bikes shifted from finely crafted steel road bikes, to more technologically advanced, event specific bikes intent on always pushing the limits.


    More on topic, I have often considered using bullhorns for a tour because I ride them almost exclusively in the city.

    PS. I have the same very nice mavic bullhorns as Lemond does in that pic. I don't have the Scott aero bars though as they are just fugly.

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    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ragboy
    Am I nuts for considering replacing my toe clips with clipless pedals on a 1987 road bike I use to commute 12 roundtrip? The reason I'm considering is I'll be doing my first multi-day tour later this summer. If I had a newer bike, I probably wouldn't hesitate, but does it make sense to spend the money on an old workhorse daily commuter?

    Also, what are your thoughts on touring (60-70 miles a day) with toe clips? Does it get uncomfortable?
    There's no reason not to use clipless pedals, if you like. I would recommend that you use SPD, or other MTB style pedals as opposed to road pedals. You'll appreciate the ability to walk around more comfortably in MTB shoes with the recessed cleat. And you can get by without bring a second pair of off-bike shoes if you like.

    BTW, you can always move the pedals to a new bike later, if you like.

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    Senior Member eric von zipper's Avatar
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    I've got Crank Bros on all of my bikes. Egg beaters on the Salsa and LHT and Candys on the fixed. GO with SPDs as stated above, there are a plethera of shoes to choose from.
    Surly Cross Check, Thorn Sherpa

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    actin' the foo ragboy's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies. How much am I looking at for a pair of MTB shoes and SPD pedals?

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    Gone, but not forgotten Shiznaz's Avatar
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    You could spend anywhere between 40 and 500 dollars for the set, but you should be able to get a good quality combo for around 100USD. You can pretty much spend what you like, and they pretty much have less 'value' as they get more expensive. Find some shoes that you like, and then choose the pedals.

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    Senior Member eric von zipper's Avatar
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    pricepoint.com, among other websites, has pedal/shoe combo deals. I haven't been to pricepoint in some time so I'm not sure what they offer now. But if you are like me and wear a different size for almost every different type of shoe, you might not want to buy online. There is aways ebay.
    Surly Cross Check, Thorn Sherpa

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragboy
    Am I nuts for considering replacing my toe clips with clipless pedals on a 1987 road bike I use to commute 12 roundtrip? ...Also, what are your thoughts on touring (60-70 miles a day) with toe clips? Does it get uncomfortable?
    If you are already used to toeclips, they are very comfortable for touring long distances. Their only real downside – clipping in – is not a huge problem when you tour because you don't stop as often as when you commute.

    On the other hand, I think that if you were to switch to clipless pedals, you would not look back. Do that as soon as you don't need winter footwear and do a few 60-70 mile day rides to make sure you are really comfortable.
    Michel Gagnon
    Montréal (Québec, Canada)

  14. #14
    Crankenstein bmclaughlin807's Avatar
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    I use combo pedals on my commuter (A 1988 Raleigh Technium). Clipless for when the temp is above about 35f, and use the platform side for when it's colder. I love the clipless pedals, and hate when it's too cold to wear my cycling shoes. If I could afford a pair of winter cycling boots I'd get them in a second.
    "There is no greater wonder than the way the face and character of a woman fit so perfectly in a man's mind, and stay there, and he could never tell you why. It just seems it was the thing he most wanted." Robert Louis Stevenson

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    toeclips

    Quote Originally Posted by ragboy
    Am I nuts for considering replacing my toe clips with clipless pedals on a 1987 road bike I use to commute 12 roundtrip? The reason I'm considering is I'll be doing my first multi-day tour later this summer. If I had a newer bike, I probably wouldn't hesitate, but does it make sense to spend the money on an old workhorse daily commuter?

    Also, what are your thoughts on touring (60-70 miles a day) with toe clips? Does it get uncomfortable?
    I like my toe clips and straps and my power grips too. I have tried clipins and didn't think they made much difference in my pedal stroke or power output. Certainly not when touring, where having shoes that you can walk or even run with is a nice thing. You never know when you may have two flat tires and you may have to walk a condsiderable distance in those "way too stiff and made for those tiny clip in pedal shoes"!!!
    Listen..plenty of cyclists for years and years used toeclips and many don't/didn't use any retention at all including a billion chinese and they don't seem to be bothered. IMHO, clip in shoes and pedals are highly overated for most cycling pursuits and in large part are a solution to a non-existant problem.
    Real racers might benefit from a few tenths or a second in a sprint or a few minutes in 100 miles but for the rest of us.........I'm sure my comments will incite a riot since it will make alot of people feel their intelligence is being threatened but if you really think about the subject, without marketing bias and racer worship mindset, you'll probably find a great freedom, riding your bicycle, without so much gagetry and you will be surprised how much slower you don't go!

  16. #16
    actin' the foo ragboy's Avatar
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    Interesting take Charles Vail -- I can't say I disagree with you, since I haven't gone clipless yet. There is something to be said about keeping it simple, though. Just wondered what the general touring rule was -- to clip or not to clip.

    I supposed what will happen eventually is I will get a new bike and go clipless on one and clips on the other and see which I prefer ultimately.

  17. #17
    Crankenstein bmclaughlin807's Avatar
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    I've used toe clips on one bike, clipless on my current bike, and platforms on everything else. The toe clips ended up being enough of a pain that I took them off. I LOVE my clipless. I use mountain bike shoes that look like normal tennis or running shoes, and I've walked 6 miles in them before. The only issue was the cleats tap on the concrete. When I walked the 6 miles I used my multi tool to remove the cleats before walking it. (I locked my bike up at the post office and realized I didn't have my keys to unlock it! )

    When I wear my clipless to work I generally wear my cycling shoes all day at work, despite the fact that I have a pair of walking shoes here that I could change into.
    "There is no greater wonder than the way the face and character of a woman fit so perfectly in a man's mind, and stay there, and he could never tell you why. It just seems it was the thing he most wanted." Robert Louis Stevenson

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    new to it

    Quote Originally Posted by ragboy
    Interesting take Charles Vail -- I can't say I disagree with you, since I haven't gone clipless yet. There is something to be said about keeping it simple, though. Just wondered what the general touring rule was -- to clip or not to clip.

    I supposed what will happen eventually is I will get a new bike and go clipless on one and clips on the other and see which I prefer ultimately.
    Well, since you havn't tried them yet......I suppose you havn't had your baptism in, "I'm falling over because I can't get unclipped fast enough", experience!!! Some of us have more trouble with this than other more naturally athletic folks. Suffice it to say, I had three such experiences, thankfully on a low seat height recumbent, so nothing was hurt other than my pride. On a upright bike I have seen one severe incident and two others without serious injury. Broken hips, elbows or gaffed up skin sometimes result. Now if you are crafty and have the balance of a ninja, like some on this board appear to have, you'll never fall over so you may be spared the indignity of it all.
    My only position regarding the whole matter is that, I don't like having to use special shoes and special pedals, especially on a tour where, I may want or have to walk, hike or even run and I don't like taking "extra" shoes, just in case. If I am loaded touring, its not so much of a problem but I like to travel light when possible. My pedaling might not be as efficient as some seem to be but I'll bet I am not far behind and after all, I am not in a race like many seem to think they are! In addition, I did a recent 55 mile ride with light baggage and did absolutely fine with my skater shoes and powergrips. Was I slower than others?...Yes but I'd be slower either way! Was I faster than some? Definately? Does it matter? Not if I am not being paid for it!!! The whole "efficiency thing" some talk about as an explanation for why they use clip-ins is completely overrated IMHO. Bicycles are plenty efficient already, with the use of correct gearing you should be able to spin all day without much worry at all and you can jump off your bike in a flash without the click! clack! ankle twist and corresponding clop! clop! into the local museum, antique store or wine tasting joint! This is what we are doing when we tour, right? Or.....are we pretending to be racing alongside Lance and busting a gut up a long climb as fast as we possibly can, ignoring all the great views, except that rotten scoundrel ahead of us that we just have to pass to the next city limit sign!!!! I guess I am making a point that there are two types of riders with different purposes in riding and you'll just have to figure where you fit in, or if its somewhere in between! There is no "general rule" or proper method only what works for you.

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    ragboy: I spent about $105+tax on double-sided "campus" pedals ($35) and Shimano shoes ($70, SH-M121G) from the Performance Bike shop in my city. They're probably cheaper online. They've been a good starter option, since I can flip over one or both pedals and use the platform side if I feel like it.

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