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  1. #1
    WATERFORD22
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    Water Bottles or Camelback?

    We begin the Southern Route mid April - I can't make up my mind on 3 water bottles or a camelback. It's seems like a along way to to carry weight on your bike, but it definitely makes keeping hydrated easier. I was also wondering about potassium suppliments due to the amount of sweating I anticipate we will be doing. Thank for everyone's opinions. Mike

  2. #2
    Senior Member Shemp's Avatar
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    I love my Camelback for mountain biking, but have no desire to carry that weight on my back if I don't have to. We carry a bit of powdered Gatorade with us and make diluted Gatorade to keep replenished with the things water lacks.

  3. #3
    eccentric tourer WestOz's Avatar
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    Here in OZ, I have to carry a lot of water and I carry water bottles and a hydro pack (Camelbak). I find it easier to remember to drink regularly with the Hydro pack, and I transfer water out of the bottles into the pack through out the day.

    I also take the suppliments because of excess sweating in the heat.

    I find that your back can get hot with a Camelbak on until you get used to it.

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    Water is heavy. Have the bike carry it, rather than your back.

  5. #5
    Third World Layabout crtreedude's Avatar
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    I personally like the camelback so that I can keep hydradate - okay, perhaps I don't like reaching down and grabbing a water bottle - but it works for me.

  6. #6
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crtreedude
    I personally like the camelback so that I can keep hydradate - okay, perhaps I don't like reaching down and grabbing a water bottle - but it works for me.
    Another advantage of Camelbaks is that they are well insulated. Pack a bag of ice in them (you can get most of a 7 lb bag of ice in one), fill with water and you'll have cold water for most of the day...even in over 100 F temperatures. Water bottles can't even come close to that. They last less than an hour even at 90 F.
    Stuart Black
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  7. #7
    Mistadobalina AGGRO's Avatar
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    If you ride a lot you may find the backpack style water bags are a pain in the neck. Literally. I switched to extra bottles.

  8. #8
    Scott n4zou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGGRO
    If you ride a lot you may find the backpack style water bags are a pain in the neck. Literally. I switched to extra bottles.
    +1

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by WestOz
    I find it easier to remember to drink regularly with the Hydro pack, and I transfer water out of the bottles into the pack through out the day.
    Just sticking the mouthpiece into my mouth is much easier than remembering to reach down and drink from the bottle. Can also do it more steadily during the ride without worrying about whether the water stream squirting down my throat is going to cause me to choke as I inhale while drinking.

    Quote Originally Posted by WestOz
    I find that your back can get hot with a Camelbak on until you get used to it.
    I agree but as cycocommute suggests, dropping ice into the Camelback can make for a pleasant sip of cool H2O in hot weather. But the Camelback is kind of annoying at times. When I first started riding, I wore the Camelback all the time and kept cellphone, keys, etc. in it. Felt funny when I went to the bottles instead because of heat on my back. But then I realized that I wasn't drinking regularly enough with the bottles...
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  10. #10
    Charles cpb406's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute
    Another advantage of Camelbaks is that they are well insulated. Pack a bag of ice in them (you can get most of a 7 lb bag of ice in one), fill with water and you'll have cold water for most of the day...even in over 100 F temperatures. Water bottles can't even come close to that. They last less than an hour even at 90 F.
    +1

  11. #11
    Senior Member Lolly Pop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WestOz
    Here in OZ, I have to carry a lot of water and I carry water bottles and a hydro pack (Camelbak). I find it easier to remember to drink regularly with the Hydro pack, and I transfer water out of the bottles into the pack through out the day.
    Me too.

    That, and I am not that coordinated. I have trouble reaching down, drinking, and steering the bike at the same time.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Shemp's Avatar
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    What I've found is yes, the water in a Camelbak stays very cold for a longer time, but the problem is the majority of your sip is of water that's been in the exposed tube. So you get a warm sip followed by a quick cold blast. Anyone tried the tube insulators?

  13. #13
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shemp
    What I've found is yes, the water in a Camelbak stays very cold for a longer time, but the problem is the majority of your sip is of water that's been in the exposed tube. So you get a warm sip followed by a quick cold blast. Anyone tried the tube insulators?
    I've used them in the winter time and they work very well there...even after an hour at 20F or lower, the water is still liquid. For summer riding I don't find it that much of an issue but I expect that they would work well there too.
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  14. #14
    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
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    Supplements
    I am not a big fan of supplements, as I believe your system will pass most of the vitamins and minerals. It's much better to get what you need in your food or in liquid form.

    So for potassium, energy drinks are your best bet, and Gatorade is easy to find.

    You should also watch your calcium intake, as you will also sweat out calcium. Cycling is also not a load-bearing exercise, so between the two, several months of sweaty touring might cause some loss in bone density. You can only digest about 500mg of calcium per sitting iirc, so again you won't gain much by some massive 2000mg morning calcium supplement....


    Camelbaks
    I'm not a fan of Camelbacks for cycling. I agree the insulation is a plus, but you pay for it with the discomfort of major back sweat. They're also much harder to clean than bottles, and I hate feeling the weight sway all over the place when I ride.

    The Polar water bottles are insulated and work ok. Not as well as a Camelback but much, much better than a regular bottle.

    Another good thing about a bottle is I can tell roughly how much I've consumed, which reduces the chance of dehydration. I can never tell when using a CB.

    However, CB's are great for hiking. So if you do day hikes, I suggest you pick one up anyway, and even if it doesn't work out for cycling you can use it for hikes.

    You can also get one of these, to make it easy to drink...

    Last edited by Bacciagalupe; 03-01-07 at 03:05 PM.

  15. #15
    Calamari to go cc_rider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul2
    Water is heavy. Have the bike carry it, rather than your back.
    Wether you carry it on your bike or your back, you still have to move the weight.
    I find the Camelback easier to use, and easier to remember to drink from. I put only water in my camelback, which keeps cleaning easy. The bottles get the sports drink.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute
    Another advantage of Camelbaks is that they are well insulated. Pack a bag of ice in them (you can get most of a 7 lb bag of ice in one), fill with water and you'll have cold water for most of the day...even in over 100 F temperatures. Water bottles can't even come close to that. They last less than an hour even at 90 F.

    Please be careful doing this. drinking ice cold water in over 100F, really shocks your system. I have a uncle who almost died doing this

  17. #17
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    Too cold to guzzle, I just stick with bottles, sit up & stretch while drinking. For extra potassium I buy ACT energy drink powder packets manufacturer direct. www.drinkact.com/olivegreen
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  18. #18
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ppereira007
    Please be careful doing this. drinking ice cold water in over 100F, really shocks your system. I have a uncle who almost died doing this
    Some people disagree

    From Tufts University:

    Can drinking ice water during exercise “shock” the system too much? Is it better to go with slightly cool water?

    There’s no harm in drinking ice-cold water when you exercise. In fact, cold fluids empty from the stomach faster than warm ones, so they’re faster at replacing water lost through sweating. That “can have an immediate effect of cooling off the body’s core” during exercise, says William Evans, PhD, director of the Nutrition, Metabolism, and Exercise Laboratory at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.
    Stuart Black
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  19. #19
    More Energy than Sense aroundoz's Avatar
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    I like and have both but the last thing I want when I tour is something on my back especially if it's warm. Camelbacks are really great for sports where you can't afford to muck around looking for a water bottle. The great thing about touring is you are not in a hurry so pull over, take in the view and grab your bottle and have a drink.

    BTW, here is my cage of choice. Blackburn stopped making them but I found a place that still had some and bought three. They hold a liter and a half and when the bottle gets yucky, recycle it and buy a new one.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  20. #20
    VWVagabonds.com Losligato's Avatar
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    I use an oversized 44oz stainless steel bottle and with a Cannondale cage that allows for easy access while riding.



    Also, a water bladder can be useful as it shrinks to fit wherever you chose to carry it.
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  21. #21
    Perineal Pressurized dobber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shemp
    What I've found is yes, the water in a Camelbak stays very cold for a longer time, but the problem is the majority of your sip is of water that's been in the exposed tube. So you get a warm sip followed by a quick cold blast. Anyone tried the tube insulators?

    Try blowing into the tube prior to taking your drink. You'll force the existing water back into the bladder.
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    Senior Member permanentjaun's Avatar
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    I don't want all the weight on my back. For my tour I will have three 28 oz bottles on the frame and then two dromedary bags. I haven't decided what size I will get. Most likely I'll buy two 4 L bags. They're indestructible and collapse down great when not filled with water. I chose to use bottles because I don't want all the weight on my body while riding. I sweat a lot so having the amount of water I need on my back makes no sense to me.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Shemp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by permanentjaun
    I don't want all the weight on my back. For my tour I will have three 28 oz bottles on the frame and then two dromedary bags. I haven't decided what size I will get. Most likely I'll buy two 4 L bags. They're indestructible and collapse down great when not filled with water. I chose to use bottles because I don't want all the weight on my body while riding. I sweat a lot so having the amount of water I need on my back makes no sense to me.
    23 pounds of water?!?!

  24. #24
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ppereira007
    Please be careful doing this. drinking ice cold water in over 100F, really shocks your system. I have a uncle who almost died doing this
    8000 riders at Hotter 'N Hell every August will disagree with you. Plenty of ice cold water and Powerade at every rest stop and no shortage of heat. I can't recall any of the medical personnel at the rest stops telling us to go easy on the cold liquids.

    Maybe your uncle drank an excessive amount of water resulting in hyponatremia, which is independent of water temperature.

  25. #25
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    A CamelBak also makes a nice pillow at night by inflating the bladder and closing the shutoff.

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