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Thread: Brake Question

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    Which bike should I ride? bullwinkle's Avatar
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    Brake Question

    A newbie to touring here, building up a rig ...

    Do the Shimano Ultegra long-reach (57 mm) brake calipers have enough clearance to be used with mudguards and 700 x 32C tyres? I would prefer this setup over canti's if it will work.

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    George Krpan
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    I have Shimano Ultegra long reach brakes on a 2005 Specialized Sequoia Comp.
    I tried 32c tires and they fit, just barely. The front tire developed an irregularity and would rub on the fork crown. I took them off.
    The brakes weren't the problem. There's no way fenders would have fitted on my bike.

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    Yes, but only if your frame has enough clearance. I can run Continental Top Touring 32mm + SKS chromoplastick fenders with sufficient clearance for light trails but nothing too muddy.

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    Which bike should I ride? bullwinkle's Avatar
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    I'm having a Merican Vincitore Special frameset fabricated for moderately-loaded "credit card" touring, so it will have the necessary clearance for the tyres and mudguards. Most of the gruppo going on the bike will be Campy Centaur, but Campy doesn't make calipers that will work.

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    If you're not building a loaded touring bike---- why stick to 32mm tires? I'd run 28mm and 26mm.

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    Year-round cyclist
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    Depends where you live. A nice pothole is only 6-inches deep. A good pothole is one where we loose a car or a truck.
    Michel Gagnon
    Montréal (Québec, Canada)

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    Well, the first step is put wheels on the bike with 32mm tires on it-- before you build. See if you have the clearance with your frame. If you have good clearance with the frame, it's a possiblity long reach brakes will work with fenders and 32mm tires. I'm guessing, not having seen your frame, that it may be build for 28mm tires (most light touring bikes are)-- ask Merican.

    Good luck

  8. #8
    Which bike should I ride? bullwinkle's Avatar
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    Perhaps I wasn't very clear with my original post. Mercian will build pretty much anything I ask them to. The frame obviously can be fabricated to accept 32 mm tyres and mudguards - the question is whether the long-reach Shimano brakes will work with the mudguards and tyres.

    From what MichaelW said above, it sounds like the brakes will work. I'm presently trying to confirm that with Mercian before they send my frame/fork order to their shop for fabrication, as it will clearly affect the rear brake bridge position, and possibly the fork configuration as well. Obviously, when I'm spending this much money (approx $2 K) on a new frameset, I want to make sure everything is going to work ahead of time.

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    There's one more thing to think about. Some brakes have a longer reach than others. Trektro makes a couple of different options I think work very well (and cheaper than the Shimano)

    http://www.tektro.com/02products/08r730.php

    These are the old standard reach bikes that may or may not work with 32mm wide tires/fenders.

    But this is what you ought to think about.

    http://www.bikeman.com/content/view/1028/33/

    These are super long reach brakes (55-73mm) made you the project bike you're building. They will work better.

    Also Google Kogswell Bikes... they make cool light touring bikes and use the super long tektro reach brakes on many of their bikes. Except that that re-brand those brakes as Kogswell...and charge a bunch more money for them!

    I'd make a detailed parts list and send it to Merican and see whay they say. I'd look into 650B wheels even-- you can run fat, think rubber tires and end up with the same gearing as a 700c racing wheel with thin tires. It's a darn strong wheel as well. but a not the most easy tire to find (get a spare folding tire for your saddle bag?)


    There's a lot of choices on a custom bike like this-- I'd look at the Kogswell website closely because they really know how to build a light touring bike. Not that Mercian doesn't. Make a list of what you want the bike to do, trust them for the right frame and parts maybe? The bright side is that you're building a wonderful bike that you're going to enjoy for years.

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    i have tektros long reach, not the "super long reach". and they work fine on my soma smoothie es with paela 32's and sks 35mm fenders

  11. #11
    Matthew Grimm / Flunky Kogswell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tacomee

    Also Google Kogswell Bikes... they make cool light touring bikes and use the super long tektro reach brakes on many of their bikes. Except that that re-brand those brakes as Kogswell...and charge a bunch more money for them!
    What!? We do sell a brake that comes from Promax. It's a dual pivot that reaches down to 63mm. And we did design our early frames around them. Promax discontinued them, we have about 50 sets left and we sell them for $30/set, the going rate for good Taiwanese dual pivots.

    We also carry the Tektro R556 which reaches down to 72mm. Those are very nice for converting steel crit frames to 650A/B. And we sell them for $40, which is FAR below the $60-80 that others are charging.
    Our current frames are designed to use them, but they come with canti posts as well since most folks use cantis.


    .
    Quote Originally Posted by tacomee

    There's a lot of choices on a custom bike like this-- I'd look at the Kogswell website closely because they really know how to build a light touring bike. Not that Mercian doesn't. Make a list of what you want the bike to do, trust them for the right frame and parts maybe? The bright side is that you're building a wonderful bike that you're going to enjoy for years.
    Light touring? Yeah. But the P/R is also a very good choice for karrying heavy loads:



    There are certainly lots of great haulers out there. What Mercian doesn't know about building touring bikes you could fit into a bottle cap with room to spare.

    But what sets the Kogswell P/R apart from other bikes on the market is our front-end geometry. We're specing forks with more than the traditional 45mm of fork offset. We've found through testing that more offset (less trail) does wonders for a bike's ability to carry a load on the front. So if you use low riders, you owe it to yourself to have a look at what more fork offset can do for you.

    This does fly in the face of conventional wisdom. But every day, more and more people are discovering that heavy loads can be carried with ease and safety.


    This year we've gone ahead and designed P/R frames and forks for 26" (MTB/559) and 700C wheels as well as 650A/B.

    And we continue to run Kogswell as a consultancy, rather than as a vendor. So if you're interested in what we're doing, give us a call and let's talk about what you're trying to accomplish.

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