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  1. #1
    Senior Member Inthe10ring's Avatar
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    Isn't weight relative?

    Ok, so here it is... I'm planning a tour from Seattle to Northern Cali, and am researching a few more necessary items yet to be purchased. ( Tent, sleeping bag, sleeping mat, and some assorted camping gear) I am looking at my options for tents, and weight seems to be the ultimate decision maker about what is tour appropriate, or not... Or is it? I'm a large man (330 lbs) and I consequently do not have a particularly light bike. I'm looking at tents that may double the amount of space that I have inside the tent, but at a cost of 4-6 lbs...
    What I'm getting at, is that between my fully loaded bike, and fully figured body (workin' on that), I have a total package(Gross Vehicle Weight) in the neighborhood of 400 lbs ... Comparatively, a 180lbs man with a much more modestly loaded machine could be in the ballpark of 230-250 lbs...
    When calculating the differences in weight between the two bikers, a 4lbs gain on my machine is an overall increase of exactly 1%. However, on a bike with a Gross Weight of 230lbs, this is ~1.8% increase, almost double the respective "weight-impact" figure... (is this making sense?) Anyhow, I guess I'm just trying to justify the purchase of a larger tent, so as to accommodate all of my gear, including bike. This same logic can be applied to any modification of bike including parts, accessories, and upgrades. Next time you are thinking of upgrading to a lighter "mo-betta, mo-hotta" goodie, crunch some numbers to see if it "adds up".

  2. #2
    Senior Member NeezyDeezy's Avatar
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    4 pounds more isn't a big deal, even if you weighed 160 like me. Besides, having a spacious tent can be really nice.

    Do you have tandem hubs on your bike?

  3. #3
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    Are you sure you want your bike in your tent with you? Sounds greasy/wet/dirty.

    As a much-smaller-than-you person, I do notice a 4-6 pound difference - most noticable when climbing, but also makes a handling difference. Can't speak to the "relative" question.

    Why don't you try out your proposed touring load with and without the extra 6 pounds. Ride up Mt. Tam or something. Then decide.

    Have fun on your tour, it sounds sweet.
    ...

  4. #4
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    Rethink the bike in the tent idea, but you might appreciate a three person tent. Two person minimum.

    My GVW is 270, including two Thermorests, Thermorest lounger, tarp, two person tent, double kickstand etc. The engine weighs 170.

    I hope you bring a few spokes and have the tools to replace them.

  5. #5
    Happy Rider
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    For me, I have been able to lose weight on my body (and I need to lose some again) with less stress than trying to cut my gear too much. When I started losing weight, I lost a bicycle rather quickly.

  6. #6
    cyclopath vik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Inthe10ring
    Ok, so here it is... I'm planning a tour from Seattle to Northern Cali, and am researching a few more necessary items yet to be purchased. ( Tent, sleeping bag, sleeping mat, and some assorted camping gear) I am looking at my options for tents, and weight seems to be the ultimate decision maker about what is tour appropriate, or not... Or is it? I'm a large man (330 lbs) and I consequently do not have a particularly light bike. I'm looking at tents that may double the amount of space that I have inside the tent, but at a cost of 4-6 lbs...
    What I'm getting at, is that between my fully loaded bike, and fully figured body (workin' on that), I have a total package(Gross Vehicle Weight) in the neighborhood of 400 lbs ... Comparatively, a 180lbs man with a much more modestly loaded machine could be in the ballpark of 230-250 lbs...
    When calculating the differences in weight between the two bikers, a 4lbs gain on my machine is an overall increase of exactly 1%. However, on a bike with a Gross Weight of 230lbs, this is ~1.8% increase, almost double the respective "weight-impact" figure... (is this making sense?) Anyhow, I guess I'm just trying to justify the purchase of a larger tent, so as to accommodate all of my gear, including bike. This same logic can be applied to any modification of bike including parts, accessories, and upgrades. Next time you are thinking of upgrading to a lighter "mo-betta, mo-hotta" goodie, crunch some numbers to see if it "adds up".

    What really matters is strength to weight ratio. If the 180lbs guy has the same muscle power as you at 330lbs than not only are you carrying your extra body weight [150lbs], but now you are adding heavy gear to the mix.

    I'd say weight of gear should be more important for heavier riders since you are already dealing with a significant weight penalty.
    safe riding - Vik
    VikApproved

  7. #7
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    Consider a trailer, it won't help with the gross weight, but will with the stress on you wheels, etc.
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


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  8. #8
    nun
    nun is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Inthe10ring
    Ok, so here it is... I'm planning a tour from Seattle to Northern Cali, and am researching a few more necessary items yet to be purchased. ( Tent, sleeping bag, sleeping mat, and some assorted camping gear) I am looking at my options for tents, and weight seems to be the ultimate decision maker about what is tour appropriate, or not... Or is it? I'm a large man (330 lbs) and I consequently do not have a particularly light bike. I'm looking at tents that may double the amount of space that I have inside the tent, but at a cost of 4-6 lbs...
    What I'm getting at, is that between my fully loaded bike, and fully figured body (workin' on that), I have a total package(Gross Vehicle Weight) in the neighborhood of 400 lbs ... Comparatively, a 180lbs man with a much more modestly loaded machine could be in the ballpark of 230-250 lbs...
    When calculating the differences in weight between the two bikers, a 4lbs gain on my machine is an overall increase of exactly 1%. However, on a bike with a Gross Weight of 230lbs, this is ~1.8% increase, almost double the respective "weight-impact" figure... (is this making sense?) Anyhow, I guess I'm just trying to justify the purchase of a larger tent, so as to accommodate all of my gear, including bike. This same logic can be applied to any modification of bike including parts, accessories, and upgrades. Next time you are thinking of upgrading to a lighter "mo-betta, mo-hotta" goodie, crunch some numbers to see if it "adds up".

    I'd say every pound is an issue, I'd pack as light as you can and try to trim down a bit. I'm currently 220lbs my bike is about 20lbs and my gear is also 20 lbs, so now I've set myself the goal of loosing 20lbs myself, bodyweight is where the tourist can save the most weight

  9. #9
    Senior Member Inthe10ring's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nun
    I'd say every pound is an issue, I'd pack as light as you can and try to trim down a bit. I'm currently 220lbs my bike is about 20lbs and my gear is also 20 lbs, so now I've set myself the goal of loosing 20lbs myself, bodyweight is where the tourist can save the most weight
    I agree with you totally there as well... I have already lost 85 lbs, and am still on my way down... Not as worried about the wheelset, actually... I have been mountain biking for 13 years ( now 24yrs old) , and have totalled my fair share of rear wheels... I'm having the rear wheel hand built with some DT Swiss "super-butted" spokes. I have the same set-up on my Kona Coiler freeride bike, (which I beat to holy hell) and it hasn't given me a lick of trouble since. I know that despite the 6" of travel front and rear on the kona, that rear wheel is taking more abuse with me in the saddle after a 4' drop-off than my Safari will see.(hopefully?) Thanks again for the input! I am making it a practice of loading the bike up several times a week, and even just running around town doing errands with my panniers full of tools and laundry (whatever fits/is heavy). Keep the tips comming!
    Ryan

  10. #10
    I'm made of earth! becnal's Avatar
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    I like having the bike in the vestibule of my tent while I sleep. What the thieves can't see, they won't be tempted to steal. I have a Nordisk GT3, but I constantly lust after the MSR Velo.


    Ummm, Velo.......... http://www.yatego.com/sport-stephan/...-personen-zelt

  11. #11
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    What we are presumably talking about here is a tent that weight 8-12 pound. The average tent is probably around 4-6. That's a very heavy tent for cycling. at 10-12 pounds it's about what your camping gear, everything you need for you except food and water would weigh, in an ultralight situation.

    So if you want to keep the stress on you down, and cost wasn't a factor then I would use a lighter tent.

    I don't doubt tent storage reduces the risk of your bike being stolen under some circumstances, but the risk is so low while camping that I think it betrays more of a panicked state of mind than anything else. I don't doubt there are places where it would help and that doesn't apply. For much lessor weight you can have a lock, which is more generally useful. If you are sleeping right next to your locked bike, I think the worry over loss is pretty much zero. If you are leaving your bike unattended but sheltered in your tent, I think the risk of theft is probaly increased.

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