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  1. #1
    Senior Member diesel_dad's Avatar
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    Marinoni Tourismo / Tourismo Extreme

    Yesterday, I test rode 3 touring bikes:
    1). Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30
    - not overly comfortable for me, top tube too long
    - rode a little rough
    2). Surly Long Haul Trucker
    - nice comfortable ride
    - soaks up bumps
    - very stable
    - heavy
    3). Marinoni Turismo
    - smooth as Surly
    - very responsive
    - lighter than alternatives
    - will not fit 700 X 38C tires with fenders

    At this point, I am falling in love with the Marinoni but I have a few questions.

    1). Has anyone toured with a Marinoni Tourismo? How much load? Any feedback?
    2). What about the Tourismo Extreme?
    - different geometry
    - called Marinoni and they said it will accomodate 700 X 38C with fenders and confirmed that Tourismo won't
    - haven't seen one, haven't ridden one but it sure sounds promising

    I would be happy with the LHT but the Tourismo Extreme sounds like it may be a better fit

  2. #2
    Sasquatch Crossing mycoatl's Avatar
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    Machka has a Marinoni Ciclo, so she'll probably chime in on the ride. I say go with what you like riding. I'm partial to the Marinoni, myself, and don't think that the 38s are a deal breaker. I ride 700 x 32 and find them plenty wide for heavy touring.

  3. #3
    cyclist gruau's Avatar
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    I have a 90's version of Marinoni's touring bicycle, and it rides like a dream, smooth, tough and stable. The fact that they are made in Canada (although I think the Rocky Mtn is too) is a good thing. They can also fully customize your frame's geometry and paint job.

    I personally like using 28c tires for most trips and have never been over 32c, but I suppose if your thinking about touring in places where there are usually more dirt roads than asphalt, then you might want to consider the Extreme.

  4. #4
    GJD
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    Does anyone have any experience with the aluminum fork that comes with the Tourismo model?

  5. #5
    Riding towards eternity.. JimmyCactus's Avatar
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    Don't forget to check the geometry. When I was looking to purchase my bike last year, I had check the marinoni ( on paper only ) And the geometry wasn't the best. The wheelbase/chainstray was shorter that other touring models. I don't know if it's enought to make a difference but I decided to go with a bike with longer wheelbase.

    Mr Cactus

  6. #6
    Senior Member diesel_dad's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input. Today I went to an LBS that had two Turismo Extremes built up but sold to other customers. Sweet.

    They had carbon forks with avid disc brakes front and rear. According to the LBS and Marinoni, the Turismo can run 700 X 32C with fenders but the Turismo Extreme (more of a traditional touring geometry) can run 700 X 38C with fenders but the rear tire needs to be inflated on the bike.

    The carbon fork has lugs for low rider racks and seems very robust. The LBS said that they had not had a carbon fork come back on a Marinoni in the last 3 years. They sell a lot of Marinonis, so I am inclined to believe them.

    Likewise, they said that they had good luck with the Avid disc brakes for touring and randonneurs. They felt that in winter riding, the durability of the pads was a big advantage. But since it's custom, you can get cantilevers instead or get discs with cantilever braze-ons as well.

    All on all -- very nice. The cost is also not too bad. About $300 more than an LHT frame, so built up with the same components, the difference is not that significant.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    I have an alum fork on my Tourismo and it tracks very well when loaded. I tour with 260-270 lbs total.

  8. #8
    touring roadie islandboy's Avatar
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    Are you riding a Marinoni Tourismo? Did you get it from Gerry?

    I have had mine since November 05. They are awesome! Toured the South Island of New Zealand with it.

  9. #9
    tuz
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    I too have a 90s touring Marinoni. Haven't try it yet sadly. I'm very partial to Marinoni. I think they're an advantage since you can really customize them to your liking. Hell you can even get a CUSTOM frame for 100$ more I think.
    homebuilt commuter, mixte, road and track (+ Ryffranck road)
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  10. #10
    My tank takes chocolate. FlowerBlossom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by diesel_dad View Post
    The carbon fork has lugs for low rider racks and seems very robust. The LBS said that they had not had a carbon fork come back on a Marinoni in the last 3 years. They sell a lot of Marinonis, so I am inclined to believe them.
    I don't want to start a carbon flame war, but I feel the need to say be careful with the carbon. A friend had carbon forks on a bike on a top-of-car rack, drove into an underground parking garage, and those forks were sliced as if they were paper cut by sharp scissors. Very clean cut.

    3 years is not a long time for a touring bike. I'd like to see some statistics on "how far did you ride your first 3 years and over what kind of terrain and how heavy were the loads and on which part of the frame were the loads" before thinking that 3 years is a long enough test. 100's of bikes sold in the same 3 year period is still only 3 years. A couple hundred bikes lasting 20 years....I like those statistics much better.

    Someone else who considered the Sherpa ended up buying one, then test riding a Trek 520---ended up it was much more comfortable for him. The Trek isn't as sexy-sounding (to me) as the Marinoni, but, it's been a solid touring bike for many years.

    Good luck!
    Feminism is the profound notion that women are human beings.

  11. #11
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    The aluminum and carbon forks are what turns me off of the Marinoni touring models. Everything I've read so far has made me partial to steel. Anyone know why some steel bikes have aluminum or carbon forks, and why some aluminum bikes have steel or chromoly forks like the Cannondale touring models?
    Last edited by MatthewGT3; 09-05-07 at 06:59 PM.

  12. #12
    Pinchbar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimblairo View Post
    I have an alum fork on my Tourismo and it tracks very well when loaded. I tour with 260-270 lbs total.
    Same fork on mine, and nearly the same rolling weight on my last trip. I thought the aluminum would make for a harsh ride, but it seems as supple as my steel bikes, even unloaded.

    I've only put 1100 km on it since I picked it up last winter, so it's too early to tell about the durability of the frame/fork. I ride a bit heavy on the front end, around 35 to 40 lbs on the fork, but I didn't experience any problems with handling or steering.

    I'm running 700 x 32C for now, with maybe 5mm clearance to the fenders; snow got packed into the fenders pretty easily. If you do were to do much touring on muddy or slushy roads, the Extreme might be a more suitable rig.

  13. #13
    Zen Master Miles2go's Avatar
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    I've heard that touring bikes handle differently when they're loaded. Oddly enough, the 3 best handling loaded rigs I've ridden have all been described as not being so comfortable to ride unloaded. Function specific design. There's a concept you don't have to go far to replicate over and over and over...

    Good luck and have fun.


    Quote Originally Posted by diesel_dad View Post
    Yesterday, I test rode 3 touring bikes:
    1). Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30
    - not overly comfortable for me, top tube too long
    - rode a little rough
    2). Surly Long Haul Trucker
    - nice comfortable ride
    - soaks up bumps
    - very stable
    - heavy
    3). Marinoni Turismo
    - smooth as Surly
    - very responsive
    - lighter than alternatives
    - will not fit 700 X 38C tires with fenders

    At this point, I am falling in love with the Marinoni but I have a few questions.

    1). Has anyone toured with a Marinoni Tourismo? How much load? Any feedback?
    2). What about the Tourismo Extreme?
    - different geometry
    - called Marinoni and they said it will accomodate 700 X 38C with fenders and confirmed that Tourismo won't
    - haven't seen one, haven't ridden one but it sure sounds promising

    I would be happy with the LHT but the Tourismo Extreme sounds like it may be a better fit
    Ron - Colorado
    The Loaded Touring Bike - Photo Gallery
    Touring bikes: Novara Safari, Cannondale T800, Rocky Mountain Sherpa, Pivot Mach 429 and BOB trailer. Past: Waterford Adventure Cycle, Co-Motion Cappuccino, Thorn Nomad, Trek 520, Bike Friday New World Tourist, Klein Attitude & BOB trailer.

  14. #14
    touring roadie islandboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miles2go View Post
    I've heard that touring bikes handle differently when they're loaded. Oddly enough, the 3 best handling loaded rigs I've ridden have all been described as not being so comfortable to ride unloaded. Function specific design. There's a concept you don't have to go far to replicate over and over and over...
    I ride my tourismo, originally with 32's, with 28's, loaded and unloaded, and it is a joy to ride either way. With front panniers the bike hugged the road a tad better than with rear panniers alone, but I think that is a function of load balance not bicycle performance.

  15. #15
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    My touring bike is comfortable both loaded and unloaded, but I would buy the idea that some are only comfortable with a load since any bike really designed around a load would be too stiff unloaded.

    Carbon is one of those things where you can't generalize. It is such a radical addition to a structure that you really have to study exactly how it is made up. The obvious thing in the case of the Marinoni is that it is on their disc bike. Discs create loads that can require unpleasant stiffness and weight to counter. But lets say you start with an aluminum fork that is strong enough generally, but you add enough carbon to help share the kind of loads that might lead to aluminum fatigue, and enough stucture to stand up to the uneven loading the disc imposes. That would be a totaly different thing that an "all" carbon fork for the lightest possible race bike. In brief, is the carbon shoring up the metal in the fork, replacing it, or something in between.

    Steel forks are wonderful on touring bikes, but the love afair is a little more limited with discs. If the steel fork is active enough to be compliant it will probably suck with a disc.

    I met a guy with an M. with a carbon fork and he had an old man front rack on it, and he had taken it loaded on tours where he had 80 pounds of gear on the bike. He looked in the 150 range. Apparently no problems.

  16. #16
    Senior Member diesel_dad's Avatar
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    Alas, I finally decided on a Surly LHT. The carbon fork and disc brakes did not strike me as a safe long-term bet with heavy loads. I have been happy with the LHT and I satisfied my need for carbon with a Specialized Roubaix road bike.

    I'd still like a Marinoni some day tho...

  17. #17
    Senior Member tourbiker's Avatar
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    I just got my Marinoni Turismo Extreme this week. It was custom built and I was able to spec out nearly the components that I wanted. It took 4-5 weeks to build then 1 week to ship to Vancouver from Quebec. I'd been looking for a couple years and reviewed 20 different models of touring bikes. Luc, Marinoni's bike builder, was very accomodating of my requests. Consequently, my Turismo Extreme is very different from the one in their brochure and website.

    If you haven't ordered the LHT, you might want to re-consider the Marinoni.

    -The Extreme has a longer wheelbase and chainstay than the regular Turismo.
    -I chose Mini V brakes instead of disc brakes. These brakes stop really well! I didn't want disc brakes for a variety of reasons.
    -I didn't want the Campagnolo gearing because they don't go low enough. I chose an 11-34 rear cassette and 22-32-44 chainrings. Great hill-climbing gears for touring the Gulf Islands fully loaded!
    -I didn't want the Extreme's oversize top tube (I don't need it) so it was built with regular tubes.
    -I chose the Carbon touring fork which should be great for my needs. It has mounts for low-riders. I could have chosen a different fork.
    -I also chose the saddle, handlebars, levers, and a variety of other specs. The most difficult decision was the colour.
    -I use 700x32c tires. I could have chosen wider fenders to fit wider tires but, I've happily toured for over 20 years on 32c tires.

    Cost: $2050 Cdn. Great price for a fully custom-built bike.

    The LHT was my 2nd choice.

    BTW, I have 4 friends with the Turismo and each has done long distance full-loaded touring and love their bikes. But, I wanted the longer wheelbase and lower gearing than the Turismo. Fortunately, the new Extreme combined with my custom specs met my criteria for traditional touring geometry.
    '07 Marinoni Turismo Touring, '83 Trek 620 Touring, Trek 1500wsd road bike
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  18. #18
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Machak is my Marinoni Ciclo (as mentioned above). I have logged probably about 45,000 kms on him since I got him 4.5 years ago in commuting, recreational riding, randonneuring, long distance racing, and loaded touring.

    Machak weighs about 27 lbs, and I generally carry 40 lbs or less of gear when I'm touring. And I'm not very heavy.

    He came with the carbon fork, and I left it on for the first year, but decided to change it out for steel before my Australian tour in 2004. That was no problem ... in fact, if I'd known, I could have probably asked for a steel fork when I ordered him. He came with a carbon seatpost, but it cracked just before that Australian tour - we noticed it when we were packing him up. And he came with carbon crankarms which I had changed out this Christmas. He is now carbon-free!

    He is a custom-built frame, but I've also customized just about everything else too.

    And I run 700x25 tires. Now that I've removed my rear fender I could go to 700x28s if I wanted, but I don't see the need.

  19. #19
    tuz
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    Quote Originally Posted by tourbiker View Post
    Cost: $2050 Cdn. Great price for a fully custom-built bike.
    Wow. Indeed. When my 10 and 15 year old Marinonis are retired I'll go for it!

    About carbon. I've never used it but I wouldn't mind using some on a touring bike fork. The weight savings are quite minimal I know, especially if it's reinforced for canti posts and low-rider mounts, but I'm convinced it is plenty strong. Steel and Al crack too and most flex/stress occurs around the BB. But damn I hate that carbon marketing crap: "absorbs high frequency vibration". What's that supposed to mean?
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  20. #20
    Cornucopia of Awesomeness baxtefer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlowerBlossom View Post
    I don't want to start a carbon flame war, but I feel the need to say be careful with the carbon. A friend had carbon forks on a bike on a top-of-car rack, drove into an underground parking garage, and those forks were sliced as if they were paper cut by sharp scissors. Very clean cut.
    So you base your fear of carbon on the stupidity of your friend?
    you should have him repeat his experiment with your steel fork and report back on the results.
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  21. #21
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuz View Post
    About carbon. I've never used it but I wouldn't mind using some on a touring bike fork. The weight savings are quite minimal I know, especially if it's reinforced for canti posts and low-rider mounts, but I'm convinced it is plenty strong. Steel and Al crack too and most flex/stress occurs around the BB. But damn I hate that carbon marketing crap: "absorbs high frequency vibration". What's that supposed to mean?
    Just before I changed my carbon forks to steel, I rode a century over a rather rough road.

    Just after I changed my carbon forks to steel, I rode a century over the same rather rough road.

    No difference.

    And as for strength ... apparently, I was stronger than my seatpost. I'm guessing overtightening it is what cracked it.

  22. #22
    Senior Member George's Avatar
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    I think the way things are going, that's all your going to see is carbon forks on bikes. I have them on my steel Jamis and I don't think you could get a smoother ride. They put stronger carbon forks on the bikes that come with disk brakes as well. I've got about 5K on the bike now and no problems at all. My weight + bike and bags 250#, I'm not worried about them.
    George

  23. #23
    Senior Member George's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    I think the way things are going, that's all your going to see is carbon forks on bikes. I have them on my steel Jamis and I don't think you could get a smoother ride. They put stronger carbon forks on the bikes that come with disk brakes as well. I've got about 5K on the bike now and no problems at all. My weight + bike and bags 250#, I'm not worried about them.
    Sorry, correction, that's 3K, but it still works.
    George

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