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  1. #1
    Senior Member adrianlatrace's Avatar
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    ok, one more thread about Hennessy Hammocks

    Alright, I know you're all really sick of discussing this by now I'm sure as there are many threads in archive about these. I'm almost sure that I would like to get a HH but I just have a couple of questions. I'm planning on riding from Chicago to either San Fran, Portland or Seattle this summer (can't decide which) and as of now just thinking of going it solo. The HH I think would be perfect for this as its light weight and from what I have read a llooooott more comfortable to sleep in.

    A coworker of mine did used the Adventure Cycling transcontinental map last year when he rode from Chicago to Cali and he said that the route would suit a traditional 2 person tent much more. He said that the HH would not be useable in places like Kansas and the other great plains states.. I'm debating on how I'd like to plan the trip and I know the Adventure Cycling maps would be a good way to go but I almost would rather create my own route. So its kind of hard to tell when I would be in a spot where the HH would not be useful.

    Have any of you had much if any issues not being able to find enough trees while touring out west? I would think that there would be no issue especially going through some of the northern and pacific northwest states. However I just want to get some feedback on this as at this point I would much prefer the HH but am not entirely sure how much I would be able to apply it throughout the long trip. Thanks

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    If your body weight allows you to go to the lighter model hammock, then you can include a tarp tent, or micro tent and stay within reasonable overall weight limits. This makes sense if the reason for carrying a ham. is more related to finding ideal campgrounds stealth or otherwise. I have found myself in places where only a bivy would work and a ham. would have been great, I also have been in places where a tent is ideal.

    It might work out to use a tarp only when you can't ham., if the reason you need to sleep on the ground is that there isn't any vegitation, maybe the bugs wouldn't be so bad. Hams. have a tarp or the weight of a proper one for ground use is not too great.

    Right now I am carrying a hammock and a micro tent. Overall weight is about what a light 2 person tent weighs. Only downside is that neither is wonderful in extended bad weather.

    There is a lot of nonsense about sleeping in hammocks being more comfortable that sleeping on the ground. There are rough patches of ground, but in decades of camping I have only rarely actually slept on an uncomfortable surface. It takes very little room to build a comfortable bed. As long as the torso area is clear the rest can be worked out. I usually sleep better in a tent on the ground than at home, unless it is really hot. Stokel, who is comited to his ham., recently reported from Europe that he was surprised how comfortable he was sleeping on the ground one night. I didn't get the feeling he was more comfortable, but as long as one can sleep and don't wake up too stiff, the fresh air and often longer nights are very acceptable whether in a tree or on the ground.

    Based on what you describe, if I was limited to one shelter it would be a tent.

  3. #3
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    I have a hennessey hammock, and although i like it, it's not perfect. A lot of the reviews that I read before buying emphasized that there is not a noticeable curve in the sleeping area - that you are basically sleeping on a flat surface. This isn't true. There is enough of a curve that I'm not able to sleep on my back with my legs outstretched (I have the regular model, and I'm just under 6 feet). You could put something under your knees to make it more comfortable, but if you move in your sleep it probably won't stay there. I'm going to try using a light inflatable matress in the hope that it will solve this problem.

    I like the idea of using the hammock in combination with a tarp tent. in hot weather you could use either the hammock or the tarp (plus no-see-um mesh) alone, and in cold weather you could combine the two, with the hammock inside the tarp tent, either suspended or on the ground as a bivy.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrianlatrace
    Alright, I know you're all really sick of discussing this by now I'm sure as there are many threads in archive about these. I'm almost sure that I would like to get a HH but I just have a couple of questions. I'm planning on riding from Chicago to either San Fran, Portland or Seattle this summer (can't decide which) and as of now just thinking of going it solo. The HH I think would be perfect for this as its light weight and from what I have read a llooooott more comfortable to sleep in.

    A coworker of mine did used the Adventure Cycling transcontinental map last year when he rode from Chicago to Cali and he said that the route would suit a traditional 2 person tent much more. He said that the HH would not be useable in places like Kansas and the other great plains states.. I'm debating on how I'd like to plan the trip and I know the Adventure Cycling maps would be a good way to go but I almost would rather create my own route. So its kind of hard to tell when I would be in a spot where the HH would not be useful.

    Have any of you had much if any issues not being able to find enough trees while touring out west? I would think that there would be no issue especially going through some of the northern and pacific northwest states. However I just want to get some feedback on this as at this point I would much prefer the HH but am not entirely sure how much I would be able to apply it throughout the long trip. Thanks
    haveing grown up in montana even though i now live in kentucky i can assure you that there is not many trees other than along river fronts at least until you get to the mountains. and that basically includes ND, SD, WY, NE, and kansas. i haven't done a tour yet but i am planning one for next spring from kentucky trough out the west to end in montana after about 5 or 6 months and while i will be planning my own i think i will use AC maps when i can and state maps where that is appropriate..

  5. #5
    Senior Member adrianlatrace's Avatar
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    I'm well below the weight capacity of the HH, however I am 6'1 so there may be some issue with the length of the hammock. I'm just having a really hard time deciding what to do.. I really don't want to spend $300 on a tent but I want something that's going to make this trip managable. Thanks for the comments.

    What's a pretty good lightweight 2 person tent under $300 that you all could recommend? I'd like to compare the pros and cons with the hennessy

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    Quote Originally Posted by adrianlatrace
    I'm well below the weight capacity of the HH, however I am 6'1 so there may be some issue with the length of the hammock. I'm just having a really hard time deciding what to do.. I really don't want to spend $300 on a tent but I want something that's going to make this trip managable. Thanks for the comments.

    What's a pretty good lightweight 2 person tent under $300 that you all could recommend? I'd like to compare the pros and cons with the hennessy
    there are many of them out there check out www.campmor.com then click on backpacking tents they have 1 and 2 person tents really for under 150 and even then you can go to ebay and check on them there... or do a google search on backpacking tents or bike touring tents... there is even a single man tent out there that uses your bike as supports but i can't remember what it is called...

  7. #7
    Senior Member Lolly Pop's Avatar
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    What about a big agnes Seedhouse SL2? It's around your price range (RRP $319) but am sure it's available more cheaply somewhere.

    Btw the tent that uses your bike is a BikeKamper, I believe. I think it is a bit heavy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lolly Pop
    What about a big agnes Seedhouse SL2? It's around your price range (RRP $319) but am sure it's available more cheaply somewhere.

    Btw the tent that uses your bike is a BikeKamper, I believe. I think it is a bit heavy.
    not sure what you consider a bit heavy but the bikamper is about 3 pounds so i3 the seedhouse superlite 2 but there is currently one for sale on ebay for 222. as of right now... and that includes the foot print.. they have several sl1s and other items just use a search for big agnus.. or just go to tents and look at them all

  9. #9
    Senior Member Lolly Pop's Avatar
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    thanks, I thought the Bikamper was heavier. I remember it got slagged here for not being a great solution as shelter goes.

  10. #10
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    hennessey also has larger models you could look at. e.g. you could get the 'explorer' model with the larger 'hex fly' (same price), along with some bug netting. in the treeless areas you could use the hammock rain fly in combination with the bug netting, your bike, and a hiking pole (or bush, etc) to make a tarptent. this combination of things would be pretty versatile.

    you'll need a matress of some sort regardless, so the issue I mentioned above may not be a problem. even if the mat doesn't level things out enough to sleep on your back with legs outstretched, if you prefer sleeping this way you could attach something to the mat to elevate your knees a bit. e.g. a bag of laundry held in place with velcro straps.

    http://www.hennessyhammock.com/catalogue.html
    http://www.google.com/search?q=tarpt...x=&startPage=1

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