Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 34
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    219
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    touring rain gear

    I'll be touring in Denmark in a few weeks, where there is the possibility of serious rain and wind (though I hope not). Last year, riding in France, I ended up doing 60km in a driving rain wearing shorts and a pretty big (non-cycling) goretex jacket. The goretex held up pretty well, but it was hot and it grabbed the wind. My shorts were soaked, which was okay. My shoes were too, which was not okay.

    To prepare better for rain-soaked days, I am thinking of getting a real cycling rain jacket and some kind of overshoe. I've read very good things about the Showers Pass Elite jacket. It sounds perfect, but it's pricey. Showers Pass has a much cheaper jacket, the Club. They also sell waterproof overshoes.

    We'll be riding about 50-60 miles a day.

    Has anyone had experience with the various Showers Pass jackets/overshoes, or have other recommendations?
    thanks

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    5,117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would look into various capes and chaps.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    219
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I found a pair of chaps (rainlegs) and ordered them, though they seem less crucial than the jacket and the overshoes.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Gotte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1,334
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd second cape/chaps (or gaters, as we call them here), the type that reach upto under your knees - plenty of air circlation, which is good. Youcan get both from Decathlon, cheap and effective.

  5. #5
    Macro Geek
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    My Bikes
    True North tourer (www.truenorthcycles.com), 2004; Miyata 1000, 1985
    Posts
    1,180
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A few years ago I bought a "water-resistant" shell. As it happened, it started to rain -- hard -- as I rode home from the store, so I put it on. Within minute, I was soaked to the skin.

    I have worn it since during drizzles, and it's been OK. But in anything more intense, it is worthless!

  6. #6
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
    Posts
    8,458
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I posted a little while back my experience commuting in a rain cape. As I said in that thread, that particular cape doesn't have optimal thumb hooks, and I assume all capes will not be aerodynamic. However, it certainly kept me dry (including shoes) and was a lot less sweaty than rain pants.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    219
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm a little shy about getting a cape. I know it will keep me pretty dry, and it's cheap, but Denmark is very windy, and we'll be riding the coast, and I don't really want to become a parasail. That's why a jacket appeals.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    463
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    One jacket I'm interested in comes from Rainshield http://www.rainshield.com/p_cycling.html I've tried on their cheapest model, which felt a little too frail, but their pricier jackets look nice.

    I'm surprised nobody's suggested wearing those Shimano sandals. That's gotta be the perfect footwear for warm and wet riding.

  9. #9
    __________ seeker333's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,684
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by niknak
    One jacket I'm interested in comes from Rainshield http://www.rainshield.com/p_cycling.html I've tried on their cheapest model, which felt a little too frail, but their pricier jackets look nice. I'm surprised nobody's suggested wearing those Shimano sandals. That's gotta be the perfect footwear for warm and wet riding.
    I had one of the rainshield hoodless jackets in size xl. It fit tight in shoulders/chest area, and leaked during the one rainstorm I tested it in. I got rid of it.

    Shimano sandals do work well in rain - very comfortable. They flex a lot for a cycling shoe - you lose >1.0 mph wearing them vs a rigid bike shoe. Also they're heavy compared to even mtb shoes.

    Quote Originally Posted by cuffydog
    I found a pair of chaps (rainlegs) and ordered them, though they seem less crucial than the jacket and the overshoes.
    I've thought about getting those (or making some) - the one area of my body I want to keep dry is the skin supporting my weight on the saddle. The fact that Rainlegs cover only leg tops means they'll breathe better than rain pants (which are universally terrible for breathability - pants don't have any ventilation zippers like most rain jackets). I consider a jacket less critical, unless its cold. I haven't found a jacket yet that doesn't leave you nearly as wet from perspiration as the rain itself.

    I'm adding a waist strap, thumb loops and scotchlite strip to a silnylon backpacking poncho I have - making my own rain cape that will do dual duty (on/off bike rain wear) and be light weight.

  10. #10
    Every day a winding road spinnaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    2005 Cannondale SR500, 2008 Trek 7.3 FX, Jamis Aurora
    Posts
    4,332
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    219
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Spinnaker--have you, or has anyone here, had any experience with this jacket? From what I've read, it really seems to work, but does it?

  12. #12
    Every day a winding road spinnaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    2005 Cannondale SR500, 2008 Trek 7.3 FX, Jamis Aurora
    Posts
    4,332
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would not have recommended it if I did not own one.

    It is an excellent jacket!

  13. #13
    A long distance Newbie wiles9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Spain/Ireland
    My Bikes
    Mountain Bike so far....
    Posts
    103
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My girl just recently bought a new jacket. Because we mountaineer as well, it needed to be a good enough mix for both. I prefer gortex XCR material by far over eVent ( although eVent is good ). Its stronger for mountaineering, and as its outer layer is DWR treated, doesnt absorb any water. Also pretty breathable, i dont like getting sweaty. For brands, it doesnt matter, any XCR jacket will be expensive and should do the job.

    For special cycling, well ya got me, i wasnt after specific at the time.

    XCR is also sometimes lighter or as light as Pac-Lites, dont be fooled by the name always!

    Jackets we got:
    North Face - universal stretch
    Arc´terix - Beta AR ( womans )


    Edit ... Another point about mountaineering style jackets, ang just pointed out. Some (ours) are big enough for climbing helmets, so should be good for bike helmets too.. They also are fitted well enough, with good draws against storm level winds, so that wouldnt be a problem.

    If you get one that is large enough, you can do what i used to do, pull the bottom of the waterproof below your seat, stops your ass gettin wet.
    Last edited by wiles9; 05-25-07 at 09:01 AM.

  14. #14
    Hooked on Touring
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2,113
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    At one time or another I've had GoreTex everything from my top of my head to my feet. I've also had a number of different water-resistent fabrics. The fact is - I've never found one that is perfect for complete dryness when cycling. The problem is that you are still pumping out a lot of moisture from your bodyif you are cycling - and if the air around you has a 100% humidity level, there ain't much place for it to go - despite claims of breathable fabric. That said - my jackets have been in the couple of hundred$ range - not a couple of thousand$. Maybe the super expensive ones can do that - but they still face that fundamental issues of physics - - how do you transport moisture into a medium that is already saturated?

    For me - long, steady rain is an excuse to stop. I get no fun outta having cold, wet feet, a cold, wet butt - and more dangerously - a cold, wet torso. Hypothermia is not to be laughed at. For me the rain gear is about staying as dry as possible when rain comes up a bit too quickly or unexpectedly. If anywhere near civilization - I look for a nice warm cafe or library. If in the boonies, I may hang out in a dense grove of trees - or pitch my tent for the night.

  15. #15
    A long distance Newbie wiles9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Spain/Ireland
    My Bikes
    Mountain Bike so far....
    Posts
    103
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +1 jama.. its not to be laughed at.

    About your opinions on it, id agree about the physics of it. The new XCR types do rock though, but 500 euros for a jacket is a lot.

    Though.. if its warm and wet, well.. id go without waterproofs a lot of the time. Reason being is: Ive seen a lot of ppl get caught in the rain, put on waterproofs already a bit wet, they tend to stay wet. It stops raining, they got to stop again , take of the gear, slightly wet, slightly sweaty. On the other hand, ive got soaked, dried in, and never needed to stop.

    Id only advice that if you know you will always stay warm. Again, hiking advice, may not be suitable for cyclists, i dont know how a wet ass rubbing for 3 hours may effect you...

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    219
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This is all good info. Given the way we've arranged our trip, we may not have much choice but to push on in the rain, which is why I want to be as well protected as possible. I did notice a cycling poncho that has a waist strap and thumb holds, so that's an option, too.

  17. #17
    Lentement mais sûrement Erick L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Montréal, Québec, Canada
    My Bikes
    Peugeot Alpin Pro, Surly LHT
    Posts
    1,985
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can never stay completely dry. What's really important is staying warm. I've gone a few times with just a wind breaker and a thin fleece and stayed warm. Good raingear keeps you from being soaked through. Don't wear too much under "breathable" raingear or you'll sweat even more and your sweat might cool off before getting to the membrane and it'll stay inside as water. Change when stopping because you'll get cold fast.

    As for specific product, I use a cheapo-deluxe local store house brand jacket. The vents are pretty good. For shoe covers, I use MEC's (here). I've had to cut a bit under for the cleats. I never wear rainpants so a little water makes its way from the top but it's a lot better than soaked through shoes.
    Erick - www.borealphoto.com/velo

  18. #18
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
    Posts
    8,458
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cuffydog
    I did notice a cycling poncho that has a waist strap and thumb holds, so that's an option, too.
    Sounds like a cape Which one is it?

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    477
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Cuffy, I have the Showers Pass Club and have ridden as long as eight hours in the rain with it. It works decently, but you can overheat and end up getting pretty sweaty. Someday, I will upgrade to the Elite, which is reportedly both more waterproof and more breathable. It won't keep you absolutely dry in prolonged rain either, but on the two long rainy brevets I rode this year, it seemed like every other person was wearing a Showers Pass Elite jacket.

  20. #20
    cyclotourist
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    calgary, canada
    Posts
    560
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Two years ago I cycled Norway and had some of the rainiest days I have ever encountered on a bicycle.
    I didn't stay perfectly dry, that would have been impossible, but I stayed dry enough.

    I have a Sierra Designs Gore Tex jacket, its actually a mountaineering type jacket, but it worked well. I had a MEC helmet cover, some old cycling chaps, that worked adequately but were rather baggy around the ankles and kept getting mixed up in the chain - I tied them up with accessory strpas but I was forced to throw them out after the trip.

    My long cycling pants were Schoeller hiking pants which repel enough water for showers and are wind resistant. When it really poured -and it did -I put the rain chaps on over them.

    Gore Tex socks, worn over my regular socks were a foot saver. They really worked for me, but I know some people don't like them.

    Neoprene cycling gloves from MEC complete the ensemble.

    I have used cycling capes in the past, and found them adequate, but they haven't worked for me in the case of really torrential rain. I have since bought some waterproof/breathable rainpants to replace my chaps, haven't needed hem cycling, but they worked well hiking in Chile.

  21. #21
    Senior Member Lolly Pop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Norn'Iron
    My Bikes
    Gardin
    Posts
    1,399
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The MEC shoe covers Erick linked are very good. I have their Serratus predecessor and recommend them highly. I am also a fan of the MEC helmet cover with the neoprene brim and drip tail.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    219
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This is all very good information. The cape I saw was by an Oregon bike clothing company called J+G: http://www.bicycleclothing.com/Rain-Capes.html

  23. #23
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
    Posts
    8,458
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cuffydog
    This is all very good information. The cape I saw was by an Oregon bike clothing company called J+G: http://www.bicycleclothing.com/Rain-Capes.html
    That's the very one I have: see post #6 and this thread for my review.

    Bottom line: it really kept me dry, even my shoes, and I hardly sweated, but the thumb loops have too much slack, and like any cape, it's not aerodynamic.

  24. #24
    Senior Member cyclezealot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Fallbrook,Calif./Palau del Vidre, France
    My Bikes
    Klein QP, Fuji touring, Surly Cross Check, BCH City bike
    Posts
    13,145
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I had a new experience in the last couple weeks. I have always said, rain would not be so bad, if only they were not cold, cold rains like one experiences in California. It only rains when it's cold.
    But, last week, i experienced briefly cycling in a warmer rain. It was not so bad . I still hate having to take take a tooth brush to my gears to get the gunk out. So, in a warm rain, you almost don't need anything. Just go as is.
    Cold rains. I have a set of thermal, rain proof tights and rain jacket. Tights seem more rain resistant than rain pants. Plus, they breath better.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    south jersey
    Posts
    1,205
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    get a 'gore-tex' (or equal) suit, including removable hood and air vents. gore-sweat is not perfect, not air-conditioned, but is a product i have used to ride in all temps, seasons, and rains (first suit 1982). i just found a non-insulated shoe cover from campmor to keep the shoes "dry" as well.
    good luck!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •