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Old 08-12-07, 09:34 AM   #1
George
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Fuji touring bike

I stopped by a Performance Bike store yesterday and I started to look at the Fuji's. They didn't have the touring bike there, but they said they could order it. They also said, if I ordered it, there was know changing of mind where I could bring it back. That doesn't sound right to me, but what I noticed about the bike is that it had a treaded headset. I thought that may help me, because at this time I'm looking to get the bars up too 42" from the floor. Anyhow doe's anybody know anything about the Fuji touring bike, thanks, George
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Old 08-12-07, 11:09 AM   #2
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I have'nt ridden the fuji touring bike but I have heard good things from people who used them on tours. Some have said, they would change a couple of stock parts, but I think most people do that on any bike. I had the same experience you did from the bike shops. Can't, change your mind once it is ordered, so I looked elsewhere. I agree the treaded headset gives you an easier way to raise the bars. I started looking at the surly long haul trucker, and was able to ride one of the bike shop employees bike. It was too big for me, but I could tell I would like the bike and the ride. Keep checking more shops to see if someone has a fuji to test ride, even if it's not your ideal size. Someone has to have one to try out, good luck.
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Old 08-12-07, 12:20 PM   #3
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Fuji makes a good touring bike....and has for a lot of years. It's higher geared than some other touring bikes, has shorter chainstays, rides much like a late 80's road bike unloaded. Fuji, like Trek, makes touring bikes that ride very well unloaded. That's what a lot of people who post here forget. The classic touring bike is really a all around commuter/touring/club rider. Fuji has been making that bike for longer than most posters here have been alive, so take all the negitive comments about Fuji with a grain of salt.

As far as the threaded headset, it's not really a proplem. The FSA unit Fuji uses is higher quality than many treadless units on other bikes. You can use a long stem and even spacers unter the headset locknut to get the bars higher. Short drop bars might help as well.

With Performance, you also can get points back to use on bike gear when you buy a bike (20% of whatever you spend, I think). I think for the MSRP of the bike you might be able to a set of JANDD racks and Axiom panniers for basicly free! (remember the rain covers)

That would pretty much get you on the road for a cheap as it gets...with a quality bike and gear.

PM if you have any questions.

Good luck,
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Old 08-12-07, 01:14 PM   #4
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George,
I have a threaded headset on my Trek 1200, and I have raised it to the max, and it is not a lot. I think that about the same hight.
As I recommended before: go with bigger frame, this will get your bar upper.
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Old 08-12-07, 01:37 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George View Post
I stopped by a Performance Bike store yesterday and I started to look at the Fuji's. They didn't have the touring bike there, but they said they could order it. They also said, if I ordered it, there was know changing of mind where I could bring it back. That doesn't sound right to me, but what I noticed about the bike is that it had a treaded headset. I thought that may help me, because at this time I'm looking to get the bars up too 42" from the floor. Anyhow doe's anybody know anything about the Fuji touring bike, thanks, George
Hi George --

FYI -- I have the Surly LHT (52cm size) and my bars are 42"(+) from the floor. My threadless steerer is uncut and I can still raise them even a little more if needed. I can send a picture of my set-up if you are interested.
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Old 08-12-07, 01:42 PM   #6
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Hi George --

FYI -- I have the Surly LHT (52cm size) and my bars are 42"(+) from the floor. My threadless steerer is uncut and I can still raise them even a little more if needed. I can send a picture of my set-up if you are interested.
He needs about 60cm frame. So I don't understand how it is that you with 52cm have your bars to 42''.
With 60cm frame it would probably be more then 42'' by default?!
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Old 08-12-07, 07:17 PM   #7
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Thanks guys, for all the replys. I really think I would like the LHT, but without riding it, I think that would worry me, because this will be my last bike. That's why I have to be very careful with my next choice. I tried the Randonee about 10 months ago and it was a very nice bike, but I couldn't use the drops, even the tops for that matter. Now that I've been riding a year and have about 4000 miles on my bike I think I can handle a good touring bike. All the research I've done, I really never thought about a Fuji, and I was down to the Cannondale and the Randonee. I really do keep thinking about the LHT, but that would be dicey. Anyhow I've got a little time yet before the new Randonee comes out, and they have a waiting list of about a month on the LHT, and REI said it would take about 4 to 6 weeks for the Cannondale. I'm glad I'm not in a hurry. They have a T800 at a store up in Bloomington Indiana for $1025 a 2006, but I have to go and pick it up. I think something will come up, but I don't have much of a choice, but to wait. Again I thank all of you, for your replys, and yes bwgride, I wouldn't mind seeing your set-up.
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Old 08-12-07, 08:06 PM   #8
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The fork is uncut. I have about a 1/2 inch spacer at top of fork which would allow me to raise bars a little more. Grips are about 43" from ground, top of bar at stem about 41" from ground. One could increase this height more, if needed, by using bars with greater rise and also by using stem extender. As it currently exists, the grips are about 2 to 3" higher than the seat; I like a more upright position since it takes weight off my hands. Since I use 26" wheels, a larger frame for LHT would use 700cm wheels which would increase bar height a little more also, but not by much.
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Old 08-12-07, 09:08 PM   #9
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Thanks a lot bwgride, that's exactly what I'm looking for, but with drop bars. I've read where the LHT are one of the best riding bikes out there. What kind of bike did you have besides this one and how doe's it compare? Thanks again.
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Old 08-12-07, 09:10 PM   #10
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Oh, I forgot, what kind of fixed stem is on your bike?
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Old 08-12-07, 10:14 PM   #11
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If this is your last bike!... don't let price get in the way! Other bikes you might consider... Trek 520, Jamis Aurora, and Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30. I own a Rocky Mountain Sherp 30 and I love the bike. I have the bars almost level with the saddle. The bike didn't come set up that way, but most of the touring bikes will come with a reverseable stem that will allow you to adjust the height of the bars through turning the stem to give you a more upright position.

I rarely use the drops on my bike either. Usually only when I tuck on a steep descent down a hill. The only touring bike mentioned above that I didn't get a chance to ride was the LHT. I'm convinced that it's a nice bike though. If you spend the time to get a professional fitting done you can get a print out of the geometry of a bike that will be most efficient and comfortable for you. I think that might be your wisest investment.

Another option is to get an adjustable stem to get your bars in the proper position. The one below is sold by performance bike. I believe that the Jamis
Aurora comes with an adjustable stem.

http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=5235

Good luck on the bike. I hope you're riding soon! It's a shame that bike shops don't stock many touring bikes.
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Old 08-13-07, 12:17 AM   #12
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Fixed stem is Nashbar threadless comfort stem 130mm and 40 degree angle (Item No. NS-ACTS about $14).

You also asked about bike fit/comfort. I'm going to possibly open a can of worms with my reply below.

I currently have six bikes, all based upon mtb type frames with two exceptions -- a 1982 Schwinn Voyageur road bike and Specialized Crossroads hybrid. I don't like drop bars so I don't buy road bikes (with the exception of the Schwinn).

The LHT pictured above is of a similar comfort level as two other bikes I ride often. The comfort, however, is not due to anything special about the LHT frame, rather it is due to my tweaking it until it fits well. I know from reading various bicycle forums that many riders hold a firm belief that frame size and fit is critical to a comfortable bike. I'm not fully in that camp. For myself, I have found if I buy a frame of a given size (seat tub of about 19" or 52cm for me or stand over height of about 30"), I can make it fit me and be comfortable by altering or adjusting these:

1. stem -- lengths and angles
2. handlebars -- width and rise
3. bar ends -- lengths and elevations
4. saddle -- forward and aft positioning and nose tilt
5. seatpost -- varying offsets and heights.

That's the reason I did not cut the fork; I want all the flexibility possible for later alterations.

My point is simply that whether you buy a Fuji, Jamis, Surly, Trek, or whatever, as long as the frame size is within the ballpark of what you need, you can alter other aspects to make it more comfortable. I think the most critical measurements for frame size are seat tube length and standover height. Others also argue that top tube length is critical, but for myself, I have found that top tube length is less important because differing top tube lengths can be addressed by stem length, handlebar angle and design, and by forward/aft placement of saddle.

Bike shops often make comfort difficult to achieve for many by cutting steerer tubes to very low heights (usually several inches below seat height). This, however, can also be addressed by using a stem extended (e.g., Nashbar has one that adds 3.5" to rise [Delta Ahead Stem Riser]).

Given my thoughts on bike fit, I've never hesitated to buy a frame online and without riding it. Two of the three bikes I ride most often were purchased online and I did not test ride them because I knew that as long as the stand over height was about right, I could adjust other aspects of fit. One point I should make is that I assemble all my bikes and this gives me confidence in trying different components and monkeying around with various stems, handlebars, etc. It is possible that many riders don't explore different components and aspects of fit because they lack confidence in working on their bikes and therefore they rely more heavily on the bike shop to determine final fit.
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Old 08-13-07, 03:13 AM   #13
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Hi George,

+1 on stem extender; several different brands. You can get them for threaded or threadless headsets.

High-rise stems are a little hard to find in 26.0mm road bar diameter but there are heaps in 25.4mm ISO diameter (like most non-oversize MTB bars use, and some road bars eg. Nitto bars). I know Salsa and BBB both make high-rise stems.
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Old 08-13-07, 08:07 AM   #14
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I'll see if this works or not, but this is the set-up I have now. The main thing I'm worried about at this point are the wheels. With me on the bike and the bags, it's about 250# and I have Ritchey Aero tour disk wheels on the bike, and I thought I would need something a little stronger.
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Old 08-13-07, 08:09 AM   #15
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<a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://i160.photobucket.com/albums/t184/Geo<a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://i160.photobucket.com/albums/t184/GeorgeM-photo/HPIM0259.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>rgeM-photo/HPIM0260.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Ph<a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://i160.photobucket.com/albums/t184/GeorgeM-photo/HPIM0258.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>otobucket"></a>
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Old 08-13-07, 08:09 AM   #16
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Old 08-13-07, 08:12 AM   #17
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Old 08-13-07, 08:13 AM   #18
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I'm going to try 1 more time and that's it.
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Old 08-13-07, 08:16 AM   #19
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Hi George --

Pictures are small (and difficult to access) so I could not see the wheels well. How many spokes on those? If you have 36 spokes, you should be fine with only 250lbs. I weight 230 and often have 280 to 300lbs total load when comumuting to work on a mountain bike with 32 spokes in the rear. That same bike was used by a friend during a recent tour he and I completed and he easily had 280lbs on it for the week's ride.

If you look in the clydesdale forum, you will find many 300+lbs riders using 36 spoke wheels successfully.
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Old 08-13-07, 06:40 PM   #20
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Now you should be able to see them. I have a riser as you can see and I don't know if I like it to much, but it works. I'm more concerned about the wheels being 32 spoke for my weight, but maybe I shouldn't, until they start cracking or something. I was just looking at wheelsets and for what they want I could buy a new bike. I guess Cannondale is going to change there touring bike, to let a person get the bars up higher. So now, I'll have to wait and see how that looks. I'm going to talk to them later in the week, maybe they would sent me a picture, but I doubt it. So I guess I'll have to cool my heels again.
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Old 08-13-07, 07:25 PM   #21
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Geo,

If you haven't figured it out by the time I visit [on a guerilla mission, of course] the Woodlands next, you can ride my LHT.

SoonerLater

P.S. -- Only 64 days to the Red River Shootout.
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Old 08-13-07, 07:40 PM   #22
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Geo,

If you haven't figured it out by the time I visit [on a guerilla mission, of course] the Woodlands next, you can ride my LHT.

SoonerLater

P.S. -- Only 64 days to the Red River Shootout.
That would be good if we could meet. I wouldn't mind trying that bike out. I just about ordered it last night and I thought I should do some more homework. Then Cannondale called and there new bike really sounds nice. I'm really going to take my time picking my next bike, because at 67 years old, I think it will be my last, thanks.
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Old 08-13-07, 08:19 PM   #23
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That would be good if we could meet. I wouldn't mind trying that bike out. I just about ordered it last night and I thought I should do some more homework. Then Cannondale called and there new bike really sounds nice. I'm really going to take my time picking my next bike, because at 67 years old, I think it will be my last, thanks.
I refuse to accept it, if you refuse to accept it.

Come to Hotter 'N Hell and I'll buy you a beer after the ride -- and that's a promise. PM me for contact info.
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Old 08-13-07, 09:12 PM   #24
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Now you should be able to see them. I have a riser as you can see and I don't know if I like it to much, but it works. I'm more concerned about the wheels being 32 spoke for my weight, but maybe I shouldn't, until they start cracking or something. I was just looking at wheelsets and for what they want I could buy a new bike. I guess Cannondale is going to change there touring bike, to let a person get the bars up higher. So now, I'll have to wait and see how that looks. I'm going to talk to them later in the week, maybe they would sent me a picture, but I doubt it. So I guess I'll have to cool my heels again.
George, it's possible to find strong wheels for prices that are not too high, especially if replacing your wheels will allow you to retain the rest of your bike. For example, http://www.universalcycles.com allows one to have custom built wheels. Using their online wheel building kit, I put together this combination for $263:

Rear Rims Mavic A719 Rim
- Silver 700c x 36 Hole
Front Rims Mavic A719 Rim
- Silver 700c x 36 Hole
Spokes DT Swiss Champion Spokes
- 2.0mm Silver
Rear Hubs Shimano FH-M756 XT Rear Disc Hub
- Black 36 - 135mm
Front Hubs Shimano HB-M756 XT Front Disc Hub
- Silver 36h - 100mm Spacing
Nipples Road Brass Nipples
- 12mm x 14g Silver

These would be strong touring wheels. Upgrade to butted spokes for a little more strength. Downgrade the hubs to Deore to save a little money with little to no loss in durability and performance. Similarly, other online retailers have good custom prices. I'd recommend also checking with aebike.com and possibly http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/wheels/622.html.
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Old 08-18-07, 01:53 PM   #25
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I'd like to know what's with the Fuji frame geometry - I thought touring bikes usually were more relaxed. Fuji seems to prefer a stretched-out top tube:

Frame Size 43CM 49CM
Actual top tube length 514.2 525.1
Effective top tube length 534.9 544.7
(sorry about the formatting, but you get the idea)

My normal road size (Trek OCLV) is 50cm with a 525 mm top tube. Fit is great. I checked out the Fuji Touring at a local Performance - both the 49 and 43cm sizes. I didn't bother with a test ride, I was felt much too stretched out on even the smaller bike and it would take a bit of work to change stem lengths, etc, just to see if I could get it to work. Their cross bikes have the same problem. (I'm looking to replace a hardtail MTB with a touring or cross bike for commuting, non-technical trails, and light touring. If my son's Jamis Coda had drop bars, it would work great - maybe I should buy it from him?.....).
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