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  1. #1
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    Building up old Fuji tourer

    Today I was in my local bike collective and asked about an old steel tourer. One of the mechanics said he had an old Fuji touring bike that was my size (60cm) and he'd let me have it whenever he could get the stuck seatpost out of it. It's a nice bike, probably from the 1980s, has quad-butted tubing (he said it was Ishiwata, although I think the sticker said Fuji tubing, maybe Ishiwata made Fuji's tubing back then) and an 18-speed decal on the drive-side chainstay. I don't remember the model name. Anybody have any info on which touring models used the quad-butted tubing?

    Also, I'll be looking for parts for it, and I'm wondering where I can get one of the old touring triple cranks. Can anybody give me a recommendation on gearing? I've seen 52-42-28 on those old ones, but is 52 and 42 a little big? Would I be better off w/a mountain crank?

    Any other advice about building up one of these things would be appreciated. Is there a database of serial numbers I could check once I have the bike in my possession?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Go over to the classics forum-- they know a lot more about old frames than I do.

    Quad butted tubing on a touring bike? What the heck for? It would get dented way to easliy. I'm betting it's just Fuji Cromoloy. Not that that's a bad thing.

    It's possible to build it up, of course, scraping up used parts to keep the price low. I'd put a MTB crank on it and friction shifting (down tube or barcon) Touring bike wheels are not cheap and lesser quality wheels are a gamble

    Personally, I'd go down to your local Fuji dealer a price a new touring bike first. Then add up all the parts you need for your frame and try to get a total price. It's very tough to beat a new Jamis or Fuji touring bike costwise, over time.

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