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Old 09-06-07, 02:23 PM   #1
finnen
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Trailer on 28 spoke wheel

I have a Specialized Sequoia with mavic 28/24 cosmos wheels. Do you think this rear wheel would hold up for trailer touring? I would definitely try to keep the weight down, and not fill the trailer completely, but it will need to have enough things for self sustained 2-3 weeks of touring, with tent etc (we are two people, so some of the things can be split up between us).
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Old 09-06-07, 05:50 PM   #2
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Probably. Trailers aren't really designed to make it possible to do loaded touring with race bikes, but people do it, just like guys weaghing 300 ride them. For what it is worth, the bob uses a 28 spoke wheel on 16" rim which is a much stouter wheel than the one you have.
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Old 09-07-07, 08:58 AM   #3
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Trailers with a wheel at the very back (bob and the like) will put more weight on the hitch than trailers with wheels in the middle, such as the burly or that single-wheel+panniers contraption.

You might want to look into one of the latter.

Another thing to consider is if you have low enough gears on your bike to pull a trailer. If you're running a road double in front, then you might consider switching to a 12-34 MTB cassette and dérailleur on the back.
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Old 09-07-07, 10:22 AM   #4
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Thanks for the tips

I'm running a triple in front (30-42-52). My plan was to buy a 11-32 cassette + deore der. and a 26 chain ring to replace the 30. I might not be able to use the 52 ring in that case, but I wouldn't want to go that fast with a trailer anyway.
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Old 09-07-07, 08:32 PM   #5
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A BoB with 40 lbs of gear adds about 12-15 lbs to the rear axel of a bicycle. Of course, this depends somewhat on how the BoB is loaded, but that should be a pretty good estimation. I've heard of several people who have used BoBs on carbon frames without any problems. Depending upon how strong you are, and how difficult the hills or mountains you intend to climb might be, will determine if your gearing is okay. Gear as low as you can. Keep your speed below about 35 M/H with the BoB and you should be okay. Faster than that and things could get rather interesting!
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